fire coral


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

fire coral

n.
Any of various brownish-yellow reef-building colonial hydrozoans of the genus Millepora having an encrusting or branching calcareous skeleton and nematocysts that release stinging barbs. Also called millepore.

[From the painful stings.]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Marine biologists have listed the hell's fire sea anemone as among the world's toxic and stinging sea creatures, along with the sea wasp box jellyfish, Irukandji jellyfish, Portuguese man o'war, cannonball jellyfish, moon jellyfish, lion's mane jellyfish, crown-of-thorns sea star, textile cone, reef stonefish, banded sea krait, short-tail stingray, soft sea slugs or nudibranchs, lionfish, puffer fish, scorpionfish, Caribbean fire coral, blue-ringed octopus, stargazer fish, striped eel catfish and sea nettle.
Additionally, these "long sleeve" sting suit tops will totally protect you from fire coral and stinging hydroids that are prevalent on ledges and wrecks throughout the Florida Keys.
Fire Coral Lifelike silk and velvet coral floats across this pillow ($235) from Michael Ragan's new tropical collection for Rags, a California brand with celebrity following.
We visited an impressive jungle of fire coral, a mangrove-covered caye inhabited solely by birds, and a caye devoted to a luxury resort closed for the season.
120 This apparently inoffensive hydrozoa is a fire coral (Millepora platyphylla) which in some areas of the Red Sea forms Millepora distinct zones of coral reefs.
Concern about the potentially damaging effects of coral harvest on the survival of reef ecosystems prompted member nations to list 17 genera of the most popular corals in trade in Appendix II of CITES in 1985 and the remaining stony coral species in 1989; currently all scleractinian coral, black coral, blue coral, fire coral, organ-pipe coral, giant clams, and queen conch are listed on the controlled list in Appendix II.