first-degree burn


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first-de·gree burn

(fûrst′dĭ-grē′)
n.
A mild burn that produces redness of the skin but no blistering.

first-degree burn

n
(Pathology) pathol See burn123

burn1

(bɜrn)

v. burned burnt, burn•ing, v.i.
1. to consume fuel and give off heat, gases, and usu. light; be on fire.
2.
a. to undergo combustion; oxidize.
b. to undergo fission or fusion.
3. (of a fireplace, furnace, etc.) to contain a fire.
4. to give off light; glow brightly: The lights burned all night.
5. to be hot: The pavement burned in the noon sun.
6. to produce or feel sharp pain or a stinging sensation: The whiskey burned in his throat.
7. to be injured, damaged, scorched, or destroyed by fire, heat, or acid.
8. to feel extreme anger.
9. to feel strong emotion: to burn with desire.
10. to sunburn.
11. Slang. to die in an electric chair.
12. to be engraved by or as if by burning: His words burned into her heart.
v.t.
13. to cause to undergo combustion or be consumed partly or wholly by fire.
14. to use as fuel or as a source of light: to burn coal.
15. to sunburn.
16. to injure, damage, scorch, or destroy with or as if with fire.
17. to execute by burning at the stake.
18. to produce with or as if with fire: to burn a hole.
19. to cause sharp pain or a stinging sensation in: The iodine burned his cut.
20. Slang. to cheat, deceive, or swindle: burned by a phony stock deal.
21. to record data on (a compact disc).
22. burn down, to burn to the ground.
23. burn in,
a. (in printing from a photographic negative) to expose (parts of an image) to more light for increased density.
b. to run (a new computer or other electronic system) continuously for several hours or days, as a test of quality before delivery to the purchaser.
24. burn off, (of morning mist) to be dissipated by the warmth of the rising sun.
25. burn out,
a. to cease operating or functioning because of heat, friction, or lack of fuel.
b. to deprive of a place to live, work, etc., by reason of fire.
c. to exhaust (oneself) or become exhausted or apathetic through overwork, stress, or intense activity.
26. burn up,
a. to burn completely.
b. Informal. to make or become angry.
n.
27. a burned place or area.
28. an injury caused by heat, abnormal cold, chemicals, poison gas, or electricity, and characterized by a painful reddening and swelling of the epidermis (first-degree burn), damage extending into the dermis, usu. with blistering (second-degree burn), or destruction of the epidermis and dermis extending into the deeper tissue (third-degree burn).
29. the process or an instance of burning or baking, as in brickmaking.
30. the firing of a rocket engine.
31. Slang. a swindle.
Idioms:
1. burn one's fingers, to suffer injury or loss by meddling or by acting rashly.
2. burn the candle at both ends, to use up one's strength or energy by immoderation.
3. burn the midnight oil, to work, study, etc., until late at night.
[before 900; Middle English bernen, brennen, Old English beornan (intrans.)]
burn′a•ble, adj.

burn2

(bɜrn)

n. Scot.
a brook or rivulet.
[before 900; Middle English b(o)urne, Old English burna, brunna brook]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.first-degree burn - burn causing redness of the skin surface
burn - an injury caused by exposure to heat or chemicals or radiation
erythema solare, sunburn - redness of the skin caused by exposure to the rays of the sun
References in periodicals archive ?
The new camouflage makeup protects the face and hands for up to 15 seconds before its own temperature rises to the point where a first-degree burn, which is a mild burn, might occur.
A first-degree burn is when the first or top layer of skin has been damaged.
At a water temperature of 130[degrees]F, only 20 seconds of exposure can produce a first-degree burn.
At 140 degrees F, it takes only 3 seconds to sustain a first-degree burn.
Sunburn is a common example of a first-degree burn.
First-degree burn occurs when the first layer of skin, the epidermis, has been burned but not burned through.
Surgical dressings are not covered for a Stage I pressure ulcer, a first-degree burn, a wound caused by trauma not requiring surgical closure or debridement, venipuncture or arterial puncture, or drainage from a cutaneous fistula not surgically created.
The driver has first-degree burns on his hands, legs and partly on the face.
n On March 25 Filipina Marita Saira suffered first-degree burns when a gas cylinder exploded as she was cooking on the first floor of Dr Jamal Al Zeera Clinic, in Isa Town, where she worked as a receptionist.
from Comoros Island, is believed to have suffered first-degree burns and was taken to hospital by her family and then transferred to Al Qasimi Hospital as her condition was reported to be critical over the past days.
In another incident in Sharjah the same day, two workers received first-degree burns.
The brothers suffered first-degree burns on different parts of their bodies, including thighs, back and abdomen.