fisc


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fisc

 (fĭsk)
n.
The treasury of a kingdom or state.

[French, from Latin fiscus, money basket, treasury.]

fisc

(fɪsk)
n
(Banking & Finance) rare a state or royal treasury
[C16: from Latin fiscus treasury, originally money-bag]

fisc

(fɪsk)

n.
a royal or state treasury; exchequer.
[1590–1600; < Middle French < Latin fiscus treasury, moneybag, literally, basket, bag]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fisc - a state treasury or exchequer or a royal treasury; originally the public treasury of Rome or the emperor's private purse
exchequer, treasury - the funds of a government or institution or individual
References in periodicals archive ?
Il faudra aussi eviter les impositions arbitraires, souvent decidees par l'agent du fisc pour pousser le contribuable a deposer plainte afin de beneficier de reductions.
The FISC is tasked to align various financial inclusion related policies and programs; ensure effective monitoring of the progress of these initiatives; and collaborate with public and private sector stakeholders on various agenda that fall under the NSFI areas of policy and regulation, financial education, consumer protection, data and measurement, and financial inclusion advocacy.
Fortier joined FISC in October of 2003 and has held multiple positions in the company, including Client Relations Representative and Client Relations Manager/Trainer.
Its decisions were not to serve as precedent, and FISC was not to offer lengthy legal analyses, crafting in the process, for instance, exceptions to the Fourth Amendment warrant requirement or defenses of wholesale surveillance programs.
Meanwhile, the government argued that only the government and the recipient of the FISC order had standing to appeal the ruling.
A: I'm not surprised by the FISC's decision, because the government's argument was crazy, and I think the FISC was right to reject it and to reject it quickly.
This problem was predicted when Jimmy Carter created the FISC process during the last political panic over intelligence, in the 1970s.
However, Robertson said that this careful work is no longer sufficient because the scope of what FISC judges do has changed since his tenure.
Principal of these initiatives was the designation of FISC San Diego as the "lead" FISC.
Under the House bill, if the FISC finds that the certification satisfies statutory requirements and targeting and minimization procedures are consistent with statutory standards and constitutional requirements under the Fourth Amendment, the FISC is to approve the certification and use of the procedures for the acquisition.
Because the legal authority to do so was always suspect (and because President Nixon abused this privilege by allowing the FBI to monitor thousands of Americans, including members of the White House staff), the FISC was created to check executive power by imposing standards and judicial review on this process.
The FISC would establish the standards and procedures to be followed by independent accountants in complying with the bill's audit requirements.