fitly


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fit 1

 (fĭt)
v. fit·ted or fit, fit·ted, fit·ting, fits
v.tr.
1.
a. To be the proper size and shape for: These shoes fit me.
b. To cause to be the proper size and shape: The tailor fitted the trousers by shortening them.
c. To measure for proper size: She fitted me for a new jacket.
2. To be appropriate to; suit: music that fits your mood.
3. To be in conformity or agreement with: observations that fit the theory nicely.
4. To make suitable; adapt: fitted the shelves for large books. See Synonyms at adapt.
5. To make ready; prepare: Specialized training fitted her for the job.
6. To equip; outfit: fit out a ship.
7. To provide a place or time for: You can't fit any more toys in the box. The doctor can fit you in today.
8. To insert or adjust so as to be properly in place: fit a handle on a door.
v.intr.
1. To be the proper size and shape.
2. To be suited; belong: doesn't fit in with these people.
3. To be in harmony; agree: His good mood fit in with the joyful occasion.
adj. fit·ter, fit·test
1. Suited, adapted, or acceptable for a given circumstance or purpose: not a fit time for flippancy.
2. Appropriate; proper: Do as you see fit.
3. Physically sound; healthy: keeps fit with diet and exercise.
4. Biology Able to survive and produce viable offspring in a particular environment
n.
1. The state, quality, or way of being fitted: the proper fit of means to ends.
2. The manner in which clothing fits: a jacket with a tight fit.
3. The degree of precision with which surfaces are adjusted or adapted to each other in a machine or collection of parts.
Idioms:
fit to be tied
Roused to great anger or indignation; outraged.
fit to kill Slang
To an extreme or elaborate degree: dressed up fit to kill.

[Middle English fitten, to be suitable, marshal troops.]

fit′ly adv.
fit′ter n.

fit 2

(fĭt)
n.
1. Medicine
a. A seizure or convulsion, especially one caused by epilepsy.
b. A sudden physical outburst: a fit of coughing; a fit of laughter.
c. A sudden, involuntary physical reaction: a fit of shivering; a fit of cramps.
d. A sudden, involuntary mental experience: a fit of amnesia; a fit of déjà vu.
2. A sudden outburst of emotion: a fit of jealousy.
3. A sudden period of vigorous activity.
Idiom:
by (or in) fits and starts
With irregular intervals of action and inaction; intermittently.

[Middle English, hardship, probably from Old English fitt, struggle.]

fit 3

 (fĭt)
n. Archaic
A section of a poem or ballad.

[Middle English, from Old English.]

fitly

(ˈfɪtlɪ)
adv
in a proper manner or place or at a proper time
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.fitly - in an appropriate manner; "he was appropriately dressed"
References in classic literature ?
You may perhaps ask how under these disadvantageous circumstances we are able to distinguish our friends from one another: but the answer to this very natural question will be more fitly and easily given when I come to describe the inhabitants of Flatland.
Inasmuch, then, as this Leviathan comes floundering down upon us from the head-waters of the Eternities, it may be fitly inquired, whether, in the long course of his generations, he has not degenerated from the original bulk of his sires.
So sweet a child as little Alice may fitly talk with angels, such as the Lady Arbella had long since become.
The mountains looked surpassingly lovely, clad as they were in living, green; ribbed with lava ridges; flecked with white cottages; riven by deep chasms purple with shade; the great slopes dashed with sunshine and mottled with shadows flung from the drifting squadrons of the sky, and the superb picture fitly crowned by towering peaks whose fronts were swept by the trailing fringes of the clouds.
But no longer snuffing in the trail of the wild beasts of the woodland, Tashtego now hunted in the wake of the great whales of the sea; the unerring harpoon of the son fitly replacing the infallible arrow of the sires.
Several days of unusually mild weather fitly ushered in a splendid Christmas Day.
But to enumerate these things were endless; I have given the rule, where a man cannot fitly play his own part; if he have not a friend, he may quit the stage.
If indeed they were fitly trained to the practice of every human virtue, every one would readily admit that they would be useful to the government; but still it might be debated whether they should be continued judges for life, to determine points of the greatest moment, since the mind has its old age as well as the body; but as they are so brought up, [1271a] that even the legislator could not depend upon them as good men, their power must be inconsistent with the safety of the state: for it is known that the members of that body have been guilty both of bribery and partiality in many public affairs; for which reason it had been much better if they had been made answerable for their conduct, which they are not.
This evil had been felt and lamented, at least three times a day, by Isabella since her residence in Bath; and she was now fated to feel and lament it once more, for at the very moment of coming opposite to Union Passage, and within view of the two gentlemen who were proceeding through the crowds, and threading the gutters of that interesting alley, they were prevented crossing by the approach of a gig, driven along on bad pavement by a most knowing-looking coachman with all the vehemence that could most fitly endanger the lives of himself, his companion, and his horse.
She had even some natural antipathy to that process of self-examination, that perpetual effort to understand one's own feeling, and express it beautifully, fitly, or energetically in language, which constituted so great a part of her mother's existence.
Their modest old brown cloth binding had long been a quiet warrant of quality in the literature it covered, and now this splendid blossom of the bookmaking art, as it seemed, was fitly employed to convey the sweetness and richness of the loveliest poetry that I thought the world had yet known.
The narrative will now be most fitly continued in the language of the doctor's own report, herewith subjoined.