five Ks


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Related to five Ks: Kachera, Kangha

five Ks

pl n
(Other Non-Christian Religions) the five Ks items traditionally worn or carried by Sikhs, each possessing a symbolic importance. See Kachera, Kangha, Kara, Kesh, Kirpan
[translation of Punjabi panch kakke]

five Ks

The five items that Sikh males are supposed to wear or carry as symbols of their faith. These are: the kangha, a comb, the kara, a steel bangle, the kesh, beard and uncut hair (covered by a turban), the kirpan, a short sword, and the kuccha, short trousers.
References in periodicals archive ?
A key part of the Sikh faith is The Five Ks, which are five items and practices that believers follow.
Embracing all these five Ks are obligatory in their religion and is practiced since centuries.
Like, the five Ks there are five vices -- Kaam (Lust), Krodth (anger), Loha (greed), Moh (emotional attachment) and Ahankaar (Ego) -- which a Sikh is supposed to get rid of.
Then injury put the star n on the side lines for five ks.
The five Ks include assess (ask about or assess behavioral health risk[s] and factors affecting choice of behavior change goals); advise (give clear, specific, and personalized behavior change advice, including information about harms and benefits); agree (collaboratively select treatment goals and methods based on interest and willingness to change); assist (using behavior change techniques, help patient to acquire the skills, confidence, and social or environmental supports for behavior change, supplemented with medical treatments when needed); and arrange (schedule follow-up to provide assistance or support and adjust the treatment plan as needed).
In real life, Gurpreet cannot, from now on, drink or smoke and must wear the five Ks of Sikh identity -- kesh ( hair), kadda ( metal bracelet), kacha ( half pant), kangha ( comb) and kirpan ( dagger).
Not everyone keeps the five Ks but most Sikhs do, and the moderates that don't, such as young lads who shave, can still be Sikhs as long as they observe some of them.
Although the keeping of unshorn hair was mandated by Guru Gobind Singh as one of the Five Ks or five articles of faith, it has long been closely associated with Sikhism since the very beginning of Sikhi in 1469.
Perhaps it should be borne in mind, too, that the Kara is only one of the five Ks, the symbols of Sikh identity.
The Kara is one of the five Ks of Sikhism, the others being the Kesh (uncut hair), the Kanga (wooden comb), the Kaccha (specially designed shorts) and the Kirpan (sword).
Ms Mountfield said the Kara was one of the five Ks of Sikhism.
Sarika's counsel, Helen Mountfield, said the Kara was one of the five Ks of Sikhism.