fixing


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Related to fixing: spot fixing, Nitrogen fixing

fix

 (fĭks)
v. fixed, fix·ing, fix·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To correct or set right; adjust: fix a misspelling; fix the out-of-date accounts.
b. To restore to proper condition or working order; repair: fix a broken machine.
2.
a. To make ready for a specific purpose, as by altering or combining elements; prepare: fixed the room for the guests; fix lunch for the kids.
b. To spay or castrate (an animal).
c. To influence the outcome or actions of (something) by improper or unlawful means: fix a prizefight; fix a jury.
d. Informal To take revenge upon (someone); get even with.
3.
a. To place securely; make stable or firm: fixed the tent poles in the ground. See Synonyms at fasten.
b. To secure to another; attach: fixing the notice to the board with tacks.
4.
a. To put into a stable or unalterable form: tried to fix the conversation in her memory.
b. To make (a chemical substance) nonvolatile or solid.
c. Biology To convert (nitrogen or carbon) into stable, biologically assimilable compounds.
d. To kill and preserve (a specimen) intact for microscopic study.
e. To prevent discoloration of (a photographic image) by washing or coating with a chemical preservative.
5. To direct steadily: fixed her eyes on the road ahead.
6. To capture or hold: The man with the long beard fixed our attention.
7.
a. To set or place definitely; establish: fixed her residence in a coastal village.
b. To determine with accuracy; ascertain: fixed the date of the ancient artifacts.
c. To agree on; arrange: fix a time to meet.
8. To assign; attribute: fixing the blame.
9. Computers To convert (data) from floating-point notation to fixed-point notation.
v.intr.
1. To direct one's efforts or attention; concentrate: We fixed on the immediate goal.
2. To become stable or firm; harden: Fresh plaster will fix in a few hours.
3. Chiefly Southern US To be on the verge of; to be making preparations for. Used in progressive tenses with the infinitive: We were fixing to leave without you.
n.
1.
a. The act of adjusting, correcting, or repairing.
b. Informal Something that repairs or restores; a solution: no easy fix for an intractable problem.
2. The position, as of a ship or aircraft, determined by visual observations with the aid of equipment.
3. A clear determination or understanding: a briefing that gave us a fix on the current situation.
4. An instance of arranging a special consideration, such as an exemption from a requirement, or an improper or illegal outcome, especially by means of bribery.
5. A difficult or embarrassing situation; a predicament: "If we get left on this wreck we are in a fix" (Mark Twain). See Synonyms at predicament.
6. Slang An amount or dose of something craved, especially an intravenous injection of a narcotic.
Phrasal Verb:
fix up
1. To improve the appearance or condition of; refurbish.
2. To provide; equip.
3. Informal To provide a companion on a date for: fixed me up with an escort at the last minute.
Idiom:
fix (someone's) wagon
To get revenge on another.

[Middle English fixen, from fix, fixed in position, from Latin fīxus, past participle of fīgere, to fasten; see dhīgw- in Indo-European roots.]

fix′a·ble adj.
Our Living Language Fixin' to ranks with y'all as one of the best known markers of dialects of the Southern United States, although it occasionally appears in the informal speech and writing of non-Southerners as well. Fixin' to means "on the verge of or in preparation for (doing a given thing)." It often follows a form of the verb to be, and it consists of the present participle of the verb fix followed by the infinitive marker to: They were fixin' to leave without me. Although locutions like is fixin' to can be used somewhat like the auxiliary verb will in sentences that describe future events, fixin' to can refer only to events that immediately follow the speaker's point of reference. One cannot say, We're fixin' to have a baby in a couple of years. The use of fixin' to as an immediate or proximate future is very common in African American Vernacular English, and is one of many features that this variety of English shares with Southern dialects. Although this expression sometimes appears in writing as fixing to, in speech it is usually pronounced fixin' to.

fixing

(ˈfɪksɪŋ)
n
(Building) a means of attaching one thing to another, as a pipe to a wall, slate to a roof, etc

fix•ing

(ˈfɪk sɪŋ)

n.
1. the act of a person or thing that fixes.
2. fixings. Also, fix•in's (ˈfɪk sɪnz) Informal.
a. the necessary ingredients.
b. the appropriate accompaniments; trimmings.
[1425–75]

fixing

The process of washing a photographic image with a preservative solution to prevent it from becoming discolored.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fixing - the act of putting something in working order againfixing - the act of putting something in working order again
improvement - the act of improving something; "their improvements increased the value of the property"
darning - the act of mending a hole in a garment with crossing threads
patching - the act of mending a hole in a garment by sewing a patch over it
maintenance, upkeep, care - activity involved in maintaining something in good working order; "he wrote the manual on car care"
quick fix, quickie, quicky, band aid - hurried repair
restoration - the act of restoring something or someone to a satisfactory state
reconstruction - the activity of constructing something again
restitution - the act of restoring something to its original state
2.fixing - restraint that attaches to something or holds something in placefixing - restraint that attaches to something or holds something in place
bellyband - a strap around the belly of a draft animal holding the shafts of a wagon
buckle - fastener that fastens together two ends of a belt or strap; often has loose prong
button - a round fastener sewn to shirts and coats etc to fit through buttonholes
carabiner, karabiner, snap ring - an oblong metal ring with a spring clip; used in mountaineering to attach a rope to a piton or to connect two ropes
catch - a fastener that fastens or locks a door or window
clasp - a fastener (as a buckle or hook) that is used to hold two things together
cleat - a fastener (usually with two projecting horns) around which a rope can be secured
clinch - the flattened part of a nail or bolt or rivet
clip - any of various small fasteners used to hold loose articles together
clothes peg, clothes pin, clothespin - wood or plastic fastener; for holding clothes on a clothesline
corrugated fastener, wiggle nail - a small strip of corrugated steel with sharp points on one side; hammered across wood joints in rough carpentry
cottar, cotter - fastener consisting of a wedge or pin inserted through a slot to hold two other pieces together
cringle, grommet, grummet, loop, eyelet - fastener consisting of a metal ring for lining a small hole to permit the attachment of cords or lines
dowel, dowel pin, joggle - a fastener that is inserted into holes in two adjacent pieces and holds them together
stopping, fillet - fastener consisting of a narrow strip of welded metal used to join steel members
hook and eye - a kind of fastener used on clothing
knot - any of various fastenings formed by looping and tying a rope (or cord) upon itself or to another rope or to another object
lashing - rope that is used for fastening something to something else; "the boats were held together by lashings"
linkup, tie-in, link, tie - a fastener that serves to join or connect; "the walls are held together with metal links placed in the wet mortar during construction"
lock - a fastener fitted to a door or drawer to keep it firmly closed
locker - a fastener that locks or closes
nail - a thin pointed piece of metal that is hammered into materials as a fastener
nut and bolt - a fastener made by screwing a nut onto a threaded bolt
paper fastener - a fastener for holding a sheet of paper in place
pin - a small slender (often pointed) piece of wood or metal used to support or fasten or attach things
constraint, restraint - a device that retards something's motion; "the car did not have proper restraints fitted"
screw - a fastener with a tapered threaded shank and a slotted head
seal - fastener that provides a tight and perfect closure
seal, sealing wax - fastener consisting of a resinous composition that is plastic when warm; used for sealing documents and parcels and letters
slide fastener, zip fastener, zipper, zip - a fastener for locking together two toothed edges by means of a sliding tab
press stud, snap fastener, snap - a fastener used on clothing; fastens with a snapping sound; "children can manage snaps better than buttons"
toggle - a fastener consisting of a peg or pin or crosspiece that is inserted into an eye at the end of a rope or a chain or a cable in order to fasten it to something (as another rope or chain or cable)
toggle bolt - a fastener consisting of a threaded bolt and a hinged spring-loaded toggle; used to fasten objects to hollow walls
3.fixing - the sterilization of an animalfixing - the sterilization of an animal; "they took him to the vet for neutering"
sterilisation, sterilization - the act of making an organism barren or infertile (unable to reproduce)
castration, emasculation - neutering a male animal by removing the testicles
spaying - neutering a female by removing the ovaries
4.fixing - (histology) the preservation and hardening of a tissue sample to retain as nearly as possible the same relations they had in the living body
histology - the branch of biology that studies the microscopic structure of animal or plant tissues
plastination - a process involving fixation and dehydration and forced impregnation and hardening of biological tissues; water and lipids are replaced by curable polymers (silicone or epoxy or polyester) that are subsequently hardened; "the plastination of specimens is valuable for research and teaching"
preservation - a process that saves organic substances from decay
References in classic literature ?
In health, yes; but otherwise he has lost everything," said Christie, fixing her eyes on the embarrassed Dick.
If I read your character rightly, Phoebe," he continued, fixing his eyes on hers with stern anxiety, intermixed with tenderness, "gentle as you are, and seeming to have your sphere among common things, you yet possess remarkable strength.
Hester Prynne," said he, fixing his naturally stern regard on the wearer of the scarlet letter, "there hath been much question concerning thee of late.