flagellum


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fla·gel·lum

 (flə-jĕl′əm)
n. pl. fla·gel·la (-jĕl′ə)
1. A long, whiplike appendage that functions as a cellular organ of locomotion, found in certain bacteria, protozoans, and specialized eukaryotic cells such as motile sperm.
2. A small whip; a scourge.

[Latin, diminutive of flagrum, whip.]

flagellum

(fləˈdʒɛləm)
n, pl -la (-lə) or -lums
1. (Biology) biology a long whiplike outgrowth from a cell that acts as an organ of locomotion: occurs in some protozoans, gametes, spores, etc
2. (Botany) botany a long thin supple shoot or runner
3. (Zoology) zoology the terminal whiplike part of an arthropod's appendage, esp of the antenna of many insects
[C19: from Latin: a little whip, from flagrum a whip, lash]
flaˈgellar adj

fla•gel•lum

(fləˈdʒɛl əm)

n., pl. -gel•la (-ˈdʒɛl ə)
-gel•lums.
1. Biol. a long lashlike appendage serving as an organ of locomotion in protozoa, sperm cells, etc.
2. Bot. a runner.
3. the upper portion of the antenna of an insect.
4. a whip or lash.
[1800–10; < Latin: whip]

fla·gel·lum

(flə-jĕl′əm)
Plural flagella
A slender tail or part extending from some single-celled organisms, such as the dinoflagellates, that whips back and forth to produce movement.

flagellum

A whiplike organelle of locomotion in sperm cells and some unicellular organisms.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flagellum - a whip used to inflict punishment (often used for pedantic humor)flagellum - a whip used to inflict punishment (often used for pedantic humor)
whip - an instrument with a handle and a flexible lash that is used for whipping
2.flagellum - a lash-like appendage used for locomotion (e.g., in sperm cells and some bacteria and protozoa)
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
sperm, sperm cell, spermatozoan, spermatozoon - the male reproductive cell; the male gamete; "a sperm is mostly a nucleus surrounded by little other cellular material"
appendage, outgrowth, process - a natural prolongation or projection from a part of an organism either animal or plant; "a bony process"
Translations
siima

fla·gel·lum

n. flagelo, prolongación o cola en la célula de algunos protozoos.
References in periodicals archive ?
FLAGELLUM A A plant's runner or shoot B A small flag C A loose fitting garment who am I?
All 4 mole cricket species had typical antennae: a scape, a pedicel (true segments, capable of active movement), and a multisegmental filiform flagellum that tapered distally.
It feeds on other plankton, living or dead, flushing food into its gullet with a flick of its flagellum.
However, the archaellum is rotating and thereby functionally resembles the bacterial flagellum.
Plumose setae and aesthetascs are present on the peduncle, and simple setae on the antennular flagellum were noted, from stage I larvae to adults.
When the robot is subjected to an oscillating field of less than five millitesla - about the strength of a decorative refrigerator magnet - it experiences a magnetic torque on its head, which causes its flagellum to oscillate and propel it forward.
When the robot is subjected to an oscillating field of less than 5 milli-Tesla - about the strength of a decorative refrigerator magnet - it experiences a magnetic torque on its head, which causes its flagellum to oscillate and propel it forward.
The second part discusses the relationship with the host in detail, including such topics as mucosal influence, siderophores, biofilms, oxidative stress, the role of the flagellum, and the difference between infection in humans and colonization in other host species.
Masticophis flagellum Often six feet or longer and very fast.
The initial infection-spreading cells of the fungus, called zoospores, swim by lashing a hair-like flagellum and don't have a cell wall.
This isoenzyme plays an important role in the process of glycolysis and ATP production in sperm flagellum and, sperm motility.