flagon


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flag·on

 (flăg′ən)
n.
1. A large vessel, usually of metal or pottery, with a handle and spout and often a lid, used for holding wine or other liquors.
2. The quantity of liquid that such a vessel can hold.

[Middle English, from Old French flacon, from Late Latin flascō, flascōn-, bottle; see flask.]

flagon

(ˈflæɡən)
n
1. (Brewing) a large bottle of wine, cider, etc
2. (Brewing) a vessel having a handle, spout, and narrow neck
[C15: from Old French flascon, from Late Latin flascō, probably of Germanic origin; see flask]

flag•on

(ˈflæg ən)

n.
1. a large bottle for wine, liquors, etc.
2. a container for holding liquids with a handle, a spout, and usu. a cover.
[1425–75; late Middle English, variant of flakon < Middle French fla(s)con < Late Latin flascōnem, acc. of flascō]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flagon - a large metal or pottery vessel with a handle and spoutflagon - a large metal or pottery vessel with a handle and spout; used to hold alcoholic beverages (usually wine)
vessel - an object used as a container (especially for liquids)
Translations

flagon

[ˈflægən] N (approx) → jarro m; (as measure) botella de unos dos litros

flagon

[ˈflægən] nbonbonne f

flagon

n (= bottle)Flasche f; (= jug)Krug m

flagon

[ˈflægən] nbottiglione m
References in classic literature ?
The Crane, in his turn, asked the Fox to sup with him, and set before her a flagon with a long narrow mouth, so that he could easily insert his neck and enjoy its contents at his leisure.
Or I watch, as from a window, while she sets off through the long parks to the distant place where he is at work, in her hand a flagon which contains his dinner.
I say to him, How can you give me this pot of oil or this flagon of wine when all your oil and wine is mine, which belief of mine this gift seems to deny?
The peasant in the sheepskins, who had sat glum and silent all evening, had been so heated by his flagon of ale that he was talking loudly and angrily with clenched hands and flashing eyes.
It was evident that the wounded man was in no danger, so Norman of Torn ordered the others to assist him into the hut, where they found Red Shandy sitting propped against the wall while the good father poured the contents of a flagon down his eager throat.
he cried, handing the heavy charged flagon to the nearest seaman.
The women on the corn-rick--Marian, who was one of them, in particular--could stop to drink ale or cold tea from the flagon now and then, or to exchange a few gossiping remarks while they wiped their faces or cleared the fragments of straw and husk from their clothing; but for Tess there was no respite; for, as the drum never stopped, the man who fed it could not stop, and she, who had to supply the man with untied sheaves, could not stop either, unless Marian changed places with her, which she sometimes did for half an hour in spite of Groby's objections that she was too slow-handed for a feeder.
The Story Girl lifted her golden-hued flagon to her red lips.
She refused the cloak as she had refused the flagon and the cake, and replied, "A sack.
Conclamatum est, poculatum est,'' said Prior Aymer; ``we have drunk and we have shouted, it were time we left our wine flagons.
Yet all were merry, for the Sheriff had promised them flagons of wine, and moreover they were to hang speedily the boldest outlaw in England, next to Robin Hood himself.
Slowly the pangs became less keen, as suffering deadened the activity of certain nerves; and then the light flashed on once again, and before me stood an array of new and tempting dishes, with great bottles of clear water and flagons of refreshing wine, upon the outside of which the cold sweat of condensation stood.