flagrant


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to flagrant: Flagrant foul

fla·grant

 (flā′grənt)
adj.
1. Conspicuously bad, offensive, or reprehensible: a flagrant miscarriage of justice. See Usage Note at blatant.
2. Obsolete Flaming; blazing.

[Latin flagrāns, flagrant-, present participle of flagrāre, to burn; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

fla′gran·cy, fla′grance n.
fla′grant·ly adv.
Synonyms: flagrant, glaring, gross, egregious, rank2
These adjectives refer to what is conspicuously bad or offensive. Flagrant applies to what is offensive to a serious or appalling degree: flagrant disregard for the law; a flagrant example of racial prejudice.
What is glaring is disturbingly or painfully obvious: a glaring error; glaring contradictions.
Gross suggests a magnitude of offense or failing that cannot be condoned or forgiven: gross ineptitude; gross injustice.
Something egregious is so offensive as to provoke outrage or condemnation: an egregious lie.
What is rank is highly offensive or repugnant: rank stupidity; rank treachery.

flagrant

(ˈfleɪɡrənt)
adj
1. openly outrageous
2. obsolete burning or blazing
[C15: from Latin flagrāre to blaze, burn]
ˈflagrancy, ˈflagrance, ˈflagrantness n
ˈflagrantly adv

fla•grant

(ˈfleɪ grənt)

adj.
1. shockingly noticeable or evident; obvious; glaring: a flagrant error.
2. notorious; scandalous: a flagrant offender.
3. Archaic. blazing, burning, or glowing.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin flagrant-, s. of flagrāns, orig. present participle of flagrāre to burn]
fla′gran•cy, fla′grance, n.
fla′grant•ly, adv.
syn: flagrant, glaring, gross suggest something offensive that cannot be overlooked. flagrant implies a conspicuous offense so far beyond the limits of decency as to be insupportable: a flagrant violation of the law. glaring emphasizes conspicuousness but lacks the imputation of evil or immorality: a glaring error by a bank teller. gross suggests a mistake or impropriety of major proportions: a gross miscarriage of justice.

flagrant

, blatant - Flagrant implies shocking and reprehensible, while blatant is obvious, contrived, and usually obnoxious; flagrant is a stronger term than blatant.
See also related terms for shocking.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.flagrant - conspicuously and outrageously bad or reprehensible; "a crying shame"; "an egregious lie"; "flagrant violation of human rights"; "a glaring error"; "gross ineptitude"; "gross injustice"; "rank treachery"
conspicuous - obvious to the eye or mind; "a tower conspicuous at a great distance"; "wore conspicuous neckties"; "made herself conspicuous by her exhibitionistic preening"

flagrant

flagrant

adjective
Conspicuously bad or offensive:
Translations
صارِخ، فاضِح، واضِح
křiklavýzjevný
åbenlys
kirívó
augljós og hneykslanlegur
baisingumassiaubingumas
brēcošsdrausmīgskliedzošs
flagrant
apaçıkgün gibi ortada

flagrant

[ˈfleɪgrənt] ADJ [violation, breach, injustice] → flagrante
in flagrant defiance of the rulesen un acto de flagrante rebeldía contra las normas
with flagrant disregard for safety/the lawcon total desacato a las normas de seguridad/a la ley

flagrant

[ˈfleɪgrənt] adjflagrant(e)

flagrant

adjeklatant, krass; injustice, crime alsohimmelschreiend; breach, violationeklatant, flagrant (geh); disregard, defiance, affairunverhohlen, offenkundig

flagrant

[ˈfleɪgrnt] adjflagrante

flagrant

(ˈfleigrənt) adjective
(usually of something bad) very obvious; easily seen. flagrant injustice.
ˈflagrantly adverb
ˈflagrancy noun
References in classic literature ?
Edward Rose, the interpreter, whose sinister looks we have already mentioned, was denounced by this secret informer as a designing, treacherous scoundrel, who was tampering with the fidelity of certain of the men, and instigating them to a flagrant piece of treason.
For a trader to refuse one of these free and flourishing blades a credit, whatever unpaid scores might stare him in the face, would be a flagrant affront scarcely to be forgiven.
And the case must be very flagrant in which its fallacy could be detected with sufficient certainty to justify the harsh expedient of compulsion.
The usurpations of the legislature might be so flagrant and so sudden, as to admit of no specious coloring.
Manson Mingott's flesh had long since made it impossible for her to go up and down stairs, and with characteristic independence she had made her reception rooms upstairs and established herself (in flagrant violation of all the New York proprieties) on the ground floor of her house; so that, as you sat in her sitting-room window with her, you caught
Boythorn found himself under the necessity of committing a flagrant trespass to restore his neighbour to himself.
As silent rivers into silent lakes, Through hush of reeds that not a murmur breaks, Wind, mindful of the poppies whence they came, So may my life, and calmly burn away, As ceases in a lamp at break of day The flagrant remnant of memorial flame.
It would be a flagrant waste on Nature's part to keep her a permanent old maid.
Scarlett Trent," she said, "it is I who should apologise, for I am a flagrant trespasser.
Remember (if indeed there be any need to remind you) that it is a flagrant landsman who is telling you this tale.
The first day he held himself aloof from her, as far as he could without any flagrant breach of hospitality: since that he has been friendly and civil, but nothing more - in my presence, at least, nor, I think, at any other time; for she seems haughty and displeased, and Lord Lowborough is manifestly more cheerful, and more cordial towards his host than before.
But the Prince of Saxe Leinitzer forgets that he has shown me no authority, or given me no valid reason why I should tolerate such flagrant interference with my personal affairs.