flagrant


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Related to flagrant: Flagrant foul

fla·grant

 (flā′grənt)
adj.
1. Conspicuously bad, offensive, or reprehensible: a flagrant miscarriage of justice. See Usage Note at blatant.
2. Obsolete Flaming; blazing.

[Latin flagrāns, flagrant-, present participle of flagrāre, to burn; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

fla′gran·cy, fla′grance n.
fla′grant·ly adv.
Synonyms: flagrant, glaring, gross, egregious, rank2
These adjectives refer to what is conspicuously bad or offensive. Flagrant applies to what is offensive to a serious or appalling degree: flagrant disregard for the law; a flagrant example of racial prejudice.
What is glaring is disturbingly or painfully obvious: a glaring error; glaring contradictions.
Gross suggests a magnitude of offense or failing that cannot be condoned or forgiven: gross ineptitude; gross injustice.
Something egregious is so offensive as to provoke outrage or condemnation: an egregious lie.
What is rank is highly offensive or repugnant: rank stupidity; rank treachery.

flagrant

(ˈfleɪɡrənt)
adj
1. openly outrageous
2. obsolete burning or blazing
[C15: from Latin flagrāre to blaze, burn]
ˈflagrancy, ˈflagrance, ˈflagrantness n
ˈflagrantly adv

fla•grant

(ˈfleɪ grənt)

adj.
1. shockingly noticeable or evident; obvious; glaring: a flagrant error.
2. notorious; scandalous: a flagrant offender.
3. Archaic. blazing, burning, or glowing.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin flagrant-, s. of flagrāns, orig. present participle of flagrāre to burn]
fla′gran•cy, fla′grance, n.
fla′grant•ly, adv.
syn: flagrant, glaring, gross suggest something offensive that cannot be overlooked. flagrant implies a conspicuous offense so far beyond the limits of decency as to be insupportable: a flagrant violation of the law. glaring emphasizes conspicuousness but lacks the imputation of evil or immorality: a glaring error by a bank teller. gross suggests a mistake or impropriety of major proportions: a gross miscarriage of justice.

flagrant

, blatant - Flagrant implies shocking and reprehensible, while blatant is obvious, contrived, and usually obnoxious; flagrant is a stronger term than blatant.
See also related terms for shocking.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.flagrant - conspicuously and outrageously bad or reprehensible; "a crying shame"; "an egregious lie"; "flagrant violation of human rights"; "a glaring error"; "gross ineptitude"; "gross injustice"; "rank treachery"
conspicuous - obvious to the eye or mind; "a tower conspicuous at a great distance"; "wore conspicuous neckties"; "made herself conspicuous by her exhibitionistic preening"

flagrant

flagrant

adjective
Conspicuously bad or offensive:
Translations
صارِخ، فاضِح، واضِح
křiklavýzjevný
åbenlys
kirívó
augljós og hneykslanlegur
baisingumassiaubingumas
brēcošsdrausmīgskliedzošs
flagrant
apaçıkgün gibi ortada

flagrant

[ˈfleɪgrənt] ADJ [violation, breach, injustice] → flagrante
in flagrant defiance of the rulesen un acto de flagrante rebeldía contra las normas
with flagrant disregard for safety/the lawcon total desacato a las normas de seguridad/a la ley

flagrant

[ˈfleɪgrənt] adjflagrant(e)

flagrant

adjeklatant, krass; injustice, crime alsohimmelschreiend; breach, violationeklatant, flagrant (geh); disregard, defiance, affairunverhohlen, offenkundig

flagrant

[ˈfleɪgrnt] adjflagrante

flagrant

(ˈfleigrənt) adjective
(usually of something bad) very obvious; easily seen. flagrant injustice.
ˈflagrantly adverb
ˈflagrancy noun
References in classic literature ?
There can be no outrage, methinks, against our common nature -- whatever be the delinquencies of the individual -- no outrage more flagrant than to forbid the culprit to hide his face for shame; as it was the essence of this punishment to do.
A Christmas frost had come at midsummer; a white December storm had whirled over June; ice glazed the ripe apples, drifts crushed the blowing roses; on hayfield and cornfield lay a frozen shroud: lanes which last night blushed full of flowers, to- day were pathless with untrodden snow; and the woods, which twelve hours since waved leafy and flagrant as groves between the tropics, now spread, waste, wild, and white as pine-forests in wintry Norway.
Say to him, then, to his beard,'' continued Malvoisin, coolly, ``that you love this captive Jewess to distraction; and the more thou dost enlarge on thy passion, the greater will be his haste to end it by the death of the fair enchantress; while thou, taken in flagrant delict by the avowal of a crime contrary to thine oath, canst hope no aid of thy brethren, and must exchange all thy brilliant visions of ambition and power, to lift perhaps a mercenary spear in some of the petty quarrels between Flanders and Burgundy.
The words of Anselmo struck Lothario with astonishment, unable as he was to conjecture the purport of such a lengthy preamble; and though be strove to imagine what desire it could be that so troubled his friend, his conjectures were all far from the truth, and to relieve the anxiety which this perplexity was causing him, he told him he was doing a flagrant injustice to their great friendship in seeking circuitous methods of confiding to him his most hidden thoughts, for be well knew he might reckon upon his counsel in diverting them, or his help in carrying them into effect.
And the case must be very flagrant in which its fallacy could be detected with sufficient certainty to justify the harsh expedient of compulsion.
The usurpations of the legislature might be so flagrant and so sudden, as to admit of no specious coloring.
He had eaten pretty nearly all the dinner, to the huge delight of his little daughter; the child was smiling at her father's flagrant infraction of the Countess' rules.
His egotism was never flagrant or tiresome--he was never crude in it, for crudeness was a plebeianism that the Hon.
I longed all at once to insult them all in a most flagrant manner and then go away.
For a trader to refuse one of these free and flourishing blades a credit, whatever unpaid scores might stare him in the face, would be a flagrant affront scarcely to be forgiven.
Harding feared there had been at least very flagrant indiscretion.
Edward Rose, the interpreter, whose sinister looks we have already mentioned, was denounced by this secret informer as a designing, treacherous scoundrel, who was tampering with the fidelity of certain of the men, and instigating them to a flagrant piece of treason.