flag of convenience

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flag of convenience

n. pl. flags of convenience
A foreign flag under which a merchant vessel is registered for purposes of reducing operating costs or avoiding government regulations.

flag of convenience

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a national flag flown by a ship registered in that country to gain financial or legal advantage
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Gabriel Mocho Rodriguez , ITF Civil Aviation Secretary added: "The practice of establishing subsidiaries and registering vessels under flags of convenience in order to avoid oversight and slash costs has long been a feature of the maritime industry.
Commercial trawlers that operate under flags of convenience, and unload in ports that do not record their catch, are unethical," Annan said, adding that these criminal activities compounded the problem of tax evasion and shell companies.
In 1997, many of our ships sailed under Flags of Convenience - registered abroad because the UK wasn't competitive enough.
The practice of flying flags of convenience, typically from countries such as Panama, Liberia or the Bahamas, makes ships subject to the legislation, environmental and labour laws of that foreign nation.
Generally, flags of convenience may be defined as "the flags
Whether this effort to avoid being tracked at sea will be more effective than changing the registration of NITC vessels to flags of convenience is doubtful.
Those working under flags of convenience of course have as much protection as the ill-fated Titanic crew.
The Games are devalued enough by athletes who seem to see GB - and other countries to be fair - as flags of convenience.
This has caused DTOs to sharply reduce the use of flags of convenience in favor of stateless go-fast and similar style vessels, as well as investing in more technologically advanced self-propelled semi (SPSS) and fully submersible (SPFS) vessels.
The Environmental Justice Foundation this week called on retailers to back its attempts to end the use of flags of convenience, which enable illegal fishing operations to hide their activities.
Cardus would not recognise the summer game today, with the overkill of Twenty20 and the astonishing instant riches available in the Indian Premier League (one batsman, Hampshire's Michael Lumb, was paid pounds 49,000 for a two-ball duck for Deccan Chargers) He would be baffled by the neverending treadmill of international cricket, the sellout by the English Cricket Board to satellite television, the mercenary activities of South Africans like Kevin Pietersen flying under flags of convenience to play for England, and so much more.