flash tube


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Related to flash tube: Flashlamp, Xenon flash lamp

flash tube

n.
A discharge tube, typically filled with xenon, that produces a brief, intense flash of light when triggered with a high voltage pulse of electricity.
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For example a red laser, such as the type used to produce a red dot on a screen during a powerpoint presentation, may contain a ruby as its gain medium with a flash tube wrapped around it.
3 Inch Height 4 Resolution 1 Rpm 5 Accuracy Plus/Minus 10 Rpm 6 Flash Tube Hand Glass X-Enon Long Life 7 Approx.
This is the reason why we decided to change the xenon flash tube light source to different technology with LED light source.
Nokia threw a curveball when they packed an uber powerful Xenon flash tube into the Lumia 1020, which came bundled with promises of better and more powerful flash.
Constructed with UV-resistant and flame-retardant polycarbonate/ABS housing and xenon strobe flash tube, 105 dB(A) the series features IP66-rated seal against dust and liquids.
The expert opined that it was a substantial factor in causing the flash tube to break causing the noise Vanloan described as "like a gun going off.
Future versions will include an Xenon flash tube for improving the still pictures taken with the Elphel camera.
The Xenon flash tube has a life of 100 million flashes, each generating 154 mJ light power lasting for 9-15[micro] second.
While cap and fuse, and detonating cord have a long history, more recent developments in non-electric initiation systems are flash tube, low-energy cord, and gas-mixture systems.
If a disc shaped sample is irradiated on one surface for a short time using a flash tube or a pulsed laser, then the temperature time curve for the back face depends on the thermal diffusivity of the sample and the heat losses.
It's built into the top left corner of the camera, but instead of mounting the flash tube on a plastic rod that sticks out in low light, Sony has placed the light bearer on a spring action arm.
Ardon Bar-Hama, a photographer of antiquities, reportedly used ultraviolet-protected flash tubes to light the scrolls for 1/4000th of a second in order to protect them from damage.