flatfoot


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flat·foot

 (flăt′fo͝ot′)
n.
1. pl. flat·feet (-fēt′) A condition in which the arch of the foot is abnormally flattened down so that the entire sole makes contact with the ground.
2. pl. flat·foots
a. Informal A person with flat feet.
b. Slang A police officer.
intr.v. flat·foot·ed, flat·foot·ing, flat·foots
To walk in a flat-footed manner: "He flatfooted along, twirling his club" (James T. Farrell).

flatfoot

(ˈflætˌfʊt)
npl -foots or -feet
1. (Pathology) Also called: splayfoot a condition in which the entire sole of the foot is able to touch the ground because of flattening of the instep arch
2. (Law) a slang word (usually derogatory) for a policeman

flat•foot

(ˈflætˌfʊt or, for 1, -ˈfʊt)

n., pl. -feet for 1, -foots for 2,3.
1.
a. a condition in which the arch of the foot is flattened so that the entire sole rests upon the ground.
b. Also, flat′ foot′. a foot with such an arch.
2. Slang. a police officer; cop.
[1865–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flatfoot - a policeman who patrols a given regionflatfoot - a policeman who patrols a given region
law officer, lawman, peace officer - an officer of the law
2.flatfoot - a foot afflicted with a fallen archflatfoot - a foot afflicted with a fallen arch; abnormally flattened and spread out
foot, human foot, pes - the part of the leg of a human being below the ankle joint; "his bare feet projected from his trousers"; "armored from head to foot"

flatfoot

noun
Slang. A member of a law-enforcement agency:
Informal: cop, law.
Slang: bull, copper, fuzz, gendarme, heat, man (often uppercase).
Chiefly British: bobby, constable, peeler.
Translations

flat·foot

, flat-foot
n. pie plano.
References in periodicals archive ?
A common misconception I see in patients who previously visited a physician or pediatrician is that children will 'grow out of' foot conditions like pediatric flatfoot, which is simply not true," Dr.
He has undergone advanced training in ankle joint replacement, as well as in reconstructive procedures, including bunion, hammertoe, and flatfoot deformity correction.
Once again, the geographical spread covers several provinces, including FlatFoot Dance Company (sponsored by NCP Alcohols) in KwaZulu-Natal, Mahikeng Jazz Festival (MJF) in North West Province (sponsored by Mosegedi & Associates) and the Open House Architectural Tour Eo Adele de Santos Monograph Exhibition (sponsored by the Cement and Concrete Institute) in the Western Cape.
The progressive orthesis family refers to a range of orthesis, same type, having progressive dimensions, which can be adapted on the flatfoot persons' shoes, due to the fact that the flatfoot disease can lead to different locomotion or stability problems.
As a young green flatfoot, she had her share of missteps and accidents.
A flatfoot, in contrast, creates a poor releve, which is less of an issue in modern dance than ballet.
If anything, with your flatfoot structure and need for an arch brace, you would be safer to use a more supportive, straight-lasted, anti-pronation shoe.
While most cases of adult-onset flatfoot require surgery, Hutchinson says congenital flatfoot is an entirely different condition that is best treated with orthotics in children.
Addition of BIO-ARCH[TM] Subtalar Implant Creates Industry-leading Portfolio for Surgical Flatfoot Deformity Correction
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The final of the Martinstown Series produced a spectacular finish, with the Christy Roche-trained Master Oscar prevailing by a half-length under an inspired ride by Jody McGarvey over gallant top-weight Flatfoot Boogie.