flavanol


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Related to flavanol: Flavonoids

fla·va·nol

 (flā′və-nôl′, -nōl′)
n.
Any of various flavonoids, such as catechin, that have a hydroxyl group attached to the carbon at position three on the heterocyclic ring and are found especially in tea, grapes, apples, and cocoa.

flavanol

(ˈfleɪvəˌnɒl)
n
a type of flavonoid found in cocoa
References in periodicals archive ?
FACT: While a percentage of cacao as high as seventy percent is likely to contain more cocoa flavanols than a traditional dark chocolate bar, the percentage of cacao is not a reliable indicator of a product's cocoa flavanol content.
A second piece of research into healthy men and women aged 35-60 found their risk of cardiovascular disease cut by 22% after consuming a flavanol drink twice a day for four weeks.
Challenging Messerli's suggestion than the Nobel-chocolate link may be the effect of flavanols in the chocolate which are known to enhance memory and other cognitive skills, they point out that figures for other flavanol-rich foodstuffs, such as tea and wine, show no correlation with Nobel Prizes.
In March 2015, the court ruled that the plaintiff did not present sufficient evidence to show that the statement "natural source of flavanol antioxidants" was "likely to mislead reasonable consumers.
CocoaVia supplements will feature a new look, a heart health focus and a product reformulation that applies the latest research in cocoa flavanol science.
Data analysis revealed that while total flavonoids were not statistically significantly associated with ovarian cancer risk, subjects in the highest quintiles of flavanol and flavanone intakes were at modestly lower risk of ovarian cancer.
As for the flavanol doses, Small says that the beverage used to deliver the high dose contained a number of other components, such as potassium, caffeine and calcium.
The results were so compelling that flavanol supplements could be considered as a new option for the treatment and prevention of memory loss.
A cocoa flavanol-containing test drink prepared specifically for research purposes was produced by the food company Mars, Incorporated, which also partly supported the research, using a proprietary process to extract flavanols from cocoa beans.
In a small study in the journal Nature Neuroscience, healthy people, ages 50 to 69, who drank a mixture high in antioxidants called cocoa flavanols for three months performed better on a memory test than people who drank a low-flavanol mixture.
The bad news is that this study uses a specially produced flavanol rich chocolate, so normal dark chocolate won't give you the same effect.