fledgling

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Related to fledglings: fledge

fledg·ling

also fledge·ling  (flĕj′lĭng)
n.
1. A young bird that has left the nest and has usually acquired flight feathers, but is often not yet able to fly.
2. A young or inexperienced person.
adj.
New and untried or inexperienced: a fledgling enterprise.

fledgling

(ˈflɛdʒlɪŋ) or

fledgeling

n
1. (Animals) a young bird that has just fledged
a young and inexperienced or untried person, organization or system

fledg•ling

(ˈflɛdʒ lɪŋ)

n.
1. a young bird that has recently fledged.
2. an inexperienced person.
adj.
3. young or inexperienced.
[1820–30]

fledg·ling

(flĕj′lĭng)
A young bird that has just grown the feathers needed to fly and is capable of surviving outside the nest.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fledgling - any new participant in some activity
beginner, initiate, tiro, tyro, novice - someone new to a field or activity
enlistee, recruit - any new member or supporter (as in the armed forces)
2.fledgling - young bird that has just fledged or become capable of flying
young bird - a bird that is still young
Adj.1.fledgling - (of a young bird) having acquired its flight feathers; "a fledgling robin"
fledged, mature - (of birds) having developed feathers or plumage; often used in combination
2.fledgling - young and inexperiencedfledgling - young and inexperienced; "a fledgling enterprise"; "a fledgling skier"; "an unfledged lawyer"
inexperienced, inexperient - lacking practical experience or training

fledgling

noun
1. chick, nestling, young bird The fathers of these fledglings are all dead.
2. new, beginning, developing, emerging, amateur, embryonic, probationary advice he gave to fledgling writers

fledgling

also fledgeling
noun
One who is just starting to learn or do something:
Slang: rookie.
Translations
طائِر صَغير
nezkušenýptáčátkoptáče
fiatal madármadár: fiatal madár

fledgling

fledgeling [ˈfledʒlɪŋ]
A. N (= young bird) → pajarito m (fig) → novato/a m/f
B. CPD [democracy, writer] → en ciernes; [company, industry] → joven

fledgling

fledgeling [ˈflɛdʒlɪŋ]
noisillon m
modif
(= inexperienced) [person] → novice
(= new) [system, organization] → jeune

fledgling

n (Orn: = young bird) → Jungvogel m
adj democracy, organization, businessjung; personfrischgebacken (inf); fledgling artistNachwuchskünstler(in) m(f); fledgling teacher/writerJunglehrer(in) m(f)/-autor(in) m(f); their feminist movement is fledgling at bestihre Feministenbewegung steckt noch in den Kinderschuhen; they began their fledgling career on a shoestringsie haben ganz klein mit sehr wenig Geld angefangen

fledgling

fledgeling [ˈflɛdʒlɪŋ] nuccellino

fledg(e)ling

(ˈfledʒliŋ) noun
a young bird ready to fly.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fledglings then spend a couple of days on the ground developing their final flight feathers.
The incidence of T gallinae was higher in nestlings (16%) than in either fledglings or breeding hawks (0%).
Keep your cats indoors around sunset and sunrise and after bad weather - this is when fledglings are most likely to come out to feed.
Although number of young fledged is a common measure of number of young recruited into the population, survival of fledglings until dispersal may be a better measure of reproductive success for population models (Keedwell, 2003).
So CDs of birdsong are now being played twice a day to the hundreds of fledglings cared for in RSPCA wildlife centres.
Protection by wardens, volunteers and an electric fence helped Wales' last remaining colony of little terns produce a record number of fledglings this summer.
Magpies will eat the eggs and fledglings in the nests.
Between April and July each year, the RSPCA is called to rescue or care for about 20,000 fledglings because people wrongly think they are abandoned.
British Waterways and the RSPCA are urging canal users not to pick up baby animals or fledglings from the tow path unless they are injured or in danger.
The shearwaters nest on land, and fledglings depart on an autumn evening to make their first, critical flight to the sea.
Babies should be returned to nexts when they fall, and fledglings like the kestrel that Origer found should be left to learn to fly, she said.