flier


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Related to flier: Flir, Take a flier, Flickr

fli·er

also fly·er  (flī′ər)
n.
1. One, such as an insect or bird, that flies with wings.
2. The pilot of an aircraft.
3. A passenger in an aircraft: special fares for business fliers.
4. A pamphlet or circular for mass distribution.
5. A step in a straight stairway.
6. Informal A daring venture.
7. often flyer
a. Australian A female kangaroo.
b. Australian An exceptionally swift kangaroo.

flier

(ˈflaɪə)
n
a variant spelling of flyer

fli•er

or fly•er

(ˈflaɪ ər)

n.
1. one that flies.
2. an aviator or pilot.
3. a small handbill; circular.
4. a risky or speculative venture.
5. one of the steps in a straight flight of stairs.
[1400–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flier - someone who travels by air
traveler, traveller - a person who changes location
2.flier - someone who operates an aircraftflier - someone who operates an aircraft  
airwoman, aviatress, aviatrix - a woman aviator
airplane pilot, pilot - someone who is licensed to operate an aircraft in flight
skilled worker, skilled workman, trained worker - a worker who has acquired special skills
3.flier - an advertisement (usually printed on a page or in a leaflet) intended for wide distributionflier - an advertisement (usually printed on a page or in a leaflet) intended for wide distribution; "he mailed the circular to all subscribers"
ad, advert, advertisement, advertising, advertizement, advertizing - a public promotion of some product or service
stuffer - an advertising circular that is enclosed with other material and (usually) sent by mail

flier

see flyer
Translations
طَيّاروَرَقة دعايَه
flugmaîur
letec

flier

[ˈflaɪəʳ] N
1.aviador(a) m/f
2. (US) → folleto m, volante m (LAm)

flier

flyer [ˈflaɪər] n
(= pilot) → aviateur/trice m/f
(= passenger) → passager/ère m/f (d'un avion)
(= handbill) → prospectus m

flier

n
(Aviat: = pilot) → Flieger(in) m(f); to be a good/bad flier (person)das Fliegen gut/nicht vertragen; (bird)ein guter/schlechter Flieger sein
(dated US) (= train)Schnellzug m; (= fast coach)Expressbus m
to take a flier (Brit, = leap) → einen Riesensprung or -satz machen; (= fall)der Länge nach hinfallen
(Brit: = flying start) → fliegender Start; he got a flierer hat einen fliegenden Start gemacht
(= leaflet)Flugblatt nt

flier

[ˈflaɪəʳ] naviatore/trice

fly2

(flai) past tense flew (fluː) : past participle flown (floun) verb
1. to (make something) go through the air on wings etc or in an aeroplane. The pilot flew (the plane) across the sea.
2. to run away (from). He flew (the country).
3. (of time) to pass quickly. The days flew past.
ˈflyer, ˈflier noun
1. a person who flies an aeroplane etc or is in one.
2. a sheet of paper advertising a product, event etc. handing out flyers to passers-by.
flying saucer
a strange flying object thought possibly to come from another planet.
flying visit
a very short, often unexpected, visit. She paid her mother a flying visit.
frequent flyer/flier noun
a passenger who flies frequently in the same airline and receives bonuses accordingly.
ˈflyleaf noun
a blank page at the beginning or end of a book.
ˈflyover noun
a road etc which is built up so as to cross above another. a flyover across the motorway.
fly in the face of
to oppose or defy; to treat with contempt. He flew in the face of danger.
fly into
suddenly to get into (a rage, a temper etc).
fly off the handle
to lose one's temper.
get off to a flying start
to have a very successful beginning. Our new shop has got off to a flying start.
let fly (often with at)
to throw, shoot or send out violently. He let fly (an arrow) at the target.
send (someone/something) flying
to hit or knock someone or something so that he or it falls down or falls backwards. She hit him and sent him flying.
References in classic literature ?
There were some passengers to get off, which caused the flier to stop, I suppose.
The boys all took a flier at the Holy Grail now and then.
The fastest flier of the Heliumetic Navy could not quickly enough have carried me far from this hideous creature.
As I drew my eyes above the level of the tower's top I saw a flier all but ready to rise.
Pompey is the pride of the local draghounds--no very great flier, as his build will show, but a staunch hound on a scent.
He had come alone in a small flier, sure of the same welcome that always awaited him at Ptarth.
Smith-Oldwick, in recalling the long months of arduous training he had undergone himself before he had been considered sufficiently adept to be considered a finished flier, smiled at the conceit of the ignorant African who was already demanding that he be permitted to make a flight alone.
Far out across the ochre sea-bottoms beyond the twin cities of Helium raced the swift flier of Tara of Helium.
It has been my wont to choose a saddle-backed feather for a dead shaft, and a swine-backed for a smooth flier.
I chose his launch because I heard that she was a flier.
Although a high flier, yet it very frequently alights on the trunks of trees.
And there, tied to the Doctor's ship, were a thousand strings; and two thousand swallows were pulling on each string--all terribly swift fliers.