flights


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flight 1

 (flīt)
n.
1.
a. The motion of an object in or through a medium, especially through the earth's atmosphere or through space.
b. An instance of such motion.
c. The distance covered in such motion: the long flight from Seattle to Little Rock.
2.
a. The act or process of flying through the air by means of wings.
b. The ability to fly: Flight is characteristic of nearly all birds.
3. A swift passage or movement: barely noticed the flight of time.
4. A scheduled airline run or trip into space: the 7:00 flight to New York; the next flight of the space shuttle.
5. A group, especially of birds or aircraft, flying together.
6. A number of aircraft in the US Air Force forming a subdivision of a squadron.
7. A round of competition, as in a sports tournament.
8. An exuberant or transcendent effort or display: a flight of the imagination; flights of oratory.
9. A series of stairs rising from one landing to another.
10. A curved plate or flange that winds in a spiral around the center shaft of an auger, designed to transport loose material upward or backward along the shaft as the auger rotates. Also called flighting.
11. A set of small samples, as of different kinds of wine or beer, that are served at the same time for comparative tasting.
intr.v. flight·ed, flight·ing, flights
To migrate or fly in flocks.

[Middle English, from Old English flyht; see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]

flight 2

 (flīt)
n.
The act or an instance of running away; an escape.

[Middle English, from Old English *flyht; see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]

flights

Three pieces of plastic or polyester that balance the dart in flight.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He had fallen into air-holes before, in previous flights, but this was a far larger one than he had ever encountered.
Many a time have I won a gallon of ale by covering a mile in three flights down Wilverley Chase.
I can but say in excuse of it that I am more accustomed to handle a rifle than a pen, and cannot make any pretence to the grand literary flights and flourishes which I see in novels--for sometimes I like to read a novel.
She doesn't even mind the five flights of stone steps.
Nor can I see any insuperable difficulty in further believing it possible that the membrane-connected fingers and fore-arm of the Galeopithecus might be greatly lengthened by natural selection; and this, as far as the organs of flight are concerned, would convert it into a bat.
After the twenty-eighth of October when the frosts began, the flight of the French assumed a still more tragic character, with men freezing, or roasting themselves to death at the campfires, while carriages with people dressed in furs continued to drive past, carrying away the property that had been stolen by the Emperor, kings, and dukes; but the process of the flight and disintegration of the French army went on essentially as before.
Towards noon whales were raised; but so soon as the ship sailed down to them, they turned and fled with swift precipitancy; a disordered flight, as of Cleopatra's barges from Actium.
A robber doesn't quite like to leave traces of his flight behind him; and, besides, he is not obliged to have his passport countersigned.
To one man, lonesomeness is the flight of the sick one; to another, it is the flight FROM the sick ones.
For my own part, I remember nothing of my flight except the stress of blundering against trees and stumbling through the heather.
A second arrow and a third soared up, missing Broken-Tooth, rustling the leaves as they passed through, arching in their flight and returning to earth.
The houses and the signs of life apparent in the village drove the alarmed birds from the direct line of their flight, toward the mountains, along the sides and near the bases of which they were glancing in dense masses, equally wonderful by the rapidity of their motion and their incredible numbers.