fling


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fling

 (flĭng)
v. flung (flŭng), fling·ing, flings
v.tr.
1. To throw with violence: flung the dish against the wall. See Synonyms at throw.
2. To put or send suddenly or unexpectedly: troops that were flung into battle.
3. To engage (oneself) in an activity with abandon and energy.
4. To cast aside; discard: fling propriety away.
v.intr.
To move quickly, violently, or impulsively: He flung out of the room.
n.
1. The act of flinging.
2. A brief period of indulging one's impulses.
3. Informal A usually brief attempt or effort: You take a fling at it.
4. A brief, casual sexual or romantic relationship.

[Middle English flingen, of Scandinavian origin; see plāk- in Indo-European roots.]

fling

(flɪŋ)
vb (mainly tr) , flings, flinging or flung (flʌŋ)
1. to throw, esp with force or abandon; hurl or toss
2. to put or send without warning or preparation: to fling someone into jail.
3. (also intr) to move (oneself or a part of the body) with abandon or speed: he flung himself into a chair.
4. (usually foll by into) to apply (oneself) diligently and with vigour (to)
5. to cast aside; disregard: she flung away her scruples.
6. to utter violently or offensively
7. poetic to give out; emit
n
8. the act or an instance of flinging; toss; throw
9. a period or occasion of unrestrained, impulsive, or extravagant behaviour: to have a fling.
10. (Dancing) any of various vigorous Scottish reels full of leaps and turns, such as the Highland fling
11. a trial; try: to have a fling at something different.
[C13: of Scandinavian origin; related to Old Norse flengja to flog, Swedish flänga, Danish flænge]
ˈflinger n

fling

(flɪŋ)

v. flung, fling•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to throw or cast with force, violence, or abandon.
2. to move (oneself) violently or abruptly: She flung herself angrily from the room.
3. to put or send suddenly or without preparation: to fling someone into jail.
4. to project or speak sharply or aggressively.
5. to involve (oneself) vigorously in an undertaking.
6. to move, do, or say quickly.
7. to throw aside or off.
v.i.
8. to move with haste or violence.
9. to fly into violent and irregular motions, as a horse.
10. to speak harshly or abusively (usu. fol. by out).
n.
11. an act or instance of flinging.
12. a short period of unrestrained pursuit of one's desires.
13. an attempt at something: to have a fling at playwriting.
14. a lively Scottish dance.
[1250–1300; Middle English]
fling′er, n.

Fling

 a number of oxbirds flying in company; a flock of dunlin or other sandpipers.
Examples: fling of dunbirds; of oxbirds, 1859.

fling


Past participle: flung
Gerund: flinging

Imperative
fling
fling
Present
I fling
you fling
he/she/it flings
we fling
you fling
they fling
Preterite
I flung
you flung
he/she/it flung
we flung
you flung
they flung
Present Continuous
I am flinging
you are flinging
he/she/it is flinging
we are flinging
you are flinging
they are flinging
Present Perfect
I have flung
you have flung
he/she/it has flung
we have flung
you have flung
they have flung
Past Continuous
I was flinging
you were flinging
he/she/it was flinging
we were flinging
you were flinging
they were flinging
Past Perfect
I had flung
you had flung
he/she/it had flung
we had flung
you had flung
they had flung
Future
I will fling
you will fling
he/she/it will fling
we will fling
you will fling
they will fling
Future Perfect
I will have flung
you will have flung
he/she/it will have flung
we will have flung
you will have flung
they will have flung
Future Continuous
I will be flinging
you will be flinging
he/she/it will be flinging
we will be flinging
you will be flinging
they will be flinging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been flinging
you have been flinging
he/she/it has been flinging
we have been flinging
you have been flinging
they have been flinging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been flinging
you will have been flinging
he/she/it will have been flinging
we will have been flinging
you will have been flinging
they will have been flinging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been flinging
you had been flinging
he/she/it had been flinging
we had been flinging
you had been flinging
they had been flinging
Conditional
I would fling
you would fling
he/she/it would fling
we would fling
you would fling
they would fling
Past Conditional
I would have flung
you would have flung
he/she/it would have flung
we would have flung
you would have flung
they would have flung
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fling - a usually brief attempt; "he took a crack at it"; "I gave it a whirl"
attempt, effort, try, endeavor, endeavour - earnest and conscientious activity intended to do or accomplish something; "made an effort to cover all the reading material"; "wished him luck in his endeavor"; "she gave it a good try"
2.fling - a brief indulgence of your impulsesfling - a brief indulgence of your impulses
spending spree - a brief period of extravagant spending
intemperateness, self-indulgence, intemperance - excess in action and immoderate indulgence of bodily appetites, especially in passion or indulgence; "the intemperance of their language"
3.fling - the act of flinging
throw - the act of throwing (propelling something with a rapid movement of the arm and wrist); "the catcher made a good throw to second base"
Verb1.fling - throw with force or recklessness; "fling the frisbee"
throw - propel through the air; "throw a frisbee"
pitch, sky, toss, flip - throw or toss with a light motion; "flip me the beachball"; "toss me newspaper"
2.fling - move in an abrupt or headlong manner; "He flung himself onto the sofa"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
3.fling - indulge oneself; "I splurged on a new TV"
ware, squander, consume, waste - spend extravagantly; "waste not, want not"
4.fling - throw or cast awayfling - throw or cast away; "Put away your worries"
unlearn - discard something previously learnt, like an old habit
deep-six, give it the deep six - toss out; get rid of; "deep-six these old souvenirs!"
jettison - throw away, of something encumbering
junk, scrap, trash - dispose of (something useless or old); "trash these old chairs"; "junk an old car"; "scrap your old computer"
waste - get rid of; "We waste the dirty water by channeling it into the sewer"
get rid of, remove - dispose of; "Get rid of these old shoes!"; "The company got rid of all the dead wood"
dump - throw away as refuse; "No dumping in these woods!"
retire - dispose of (something no longer useful or needed); "She finally retired that old coat"
abandon - forsake, leave behind; "We abandoned the old car in the empty parking lot"
liquidize, sell out, sell up - get rid of all one's merchandise
de-access - dispose of by selling; "the museum sold off its collection of French impressionists to raise money"; "the publishing house sold off one of its popular magazines"
close out - terminate by selling off or disposing of; "He closed out his line of sports cars"

fling

verb
1. throw, toss, hurl, chuck (informal), launch, cast, pitch, send, shy, jerk, propel, sling, precipitate, lob (informal), catapult, heave, let fly The woman flung the cup at him.
noun
1. affair, relationship, involvement, liaison, flirtation, amour, dalliance She had a fling with him 30 years ago.
2. binge, good time, bash, bit of fun, party, rave (Brit. slang), spree, indulgence (informal), beano (Brit. slang), night on the town, rave-up (Brit. slang), night on the razzle (informal), hooley or hoolie (chiefly Irish & N.Z.) the last fling before you take up a job
3. try, go (informal), attempt, shot (informal), trial, crack (informal), venture, gamble, stab (informal), bash (informal), whirl (informal) the England bowler's chance of a fling at South Africa in the second Test today

fling

verb
To send through the air with a motion of the hand or arm:
Informal: fire.
noun
1. An act of throwing:
2. A period of uncontrolled self-indulgence:
Slang: jag.
3. Informal. A brief trial:
Informal: shot, whack, whirl.
Translations
رَقْص شَعْبي أسكُتْلَنْدييَرْمي، يَقْذِفيَطْرَحُيَنْدَفِع
mrštitskotský tanecvyřítit se
kastekylelivlig skotsk dansskynde sigslynge
heittää
baciti
kirohan
henda, kastahendast, flengjastskoskur dans
投げ飛ばす
던지다
drāztiesmestmestiesstrauja skotu dejasviest
škótsky tanecvyrútiť sa
vreči
kasta
ขว้าง
quăng

fling

[flɪŋ] (flung (vb: pt, pp))
A. N
1. to have one's last flingechar la última cana al aire
to have one's fling; go on a flingechar una canita al aire
to have a fling at doing sthintentar algo
2.aventura f amorosa
3. (also highland fling)
see highland
B. VT [+ stone] → arrojar, lanzar
to fling one's arms round sbechar los brazos al cuello a algn
the door was flung openla puerta se abrió de golpe
she was flung to the ground by her horseel caballo la lanzó or tiró or arrojó al suelo
to fling sb into jailmeter a algn en la cárcel
to fling o.s. over a cliffdespeñarse por un precipicio
she flung herself at himse arrojó or lanzó or tiró sobre él
to fling o.s into a chairdejarse caer de golpe en una silla
to fling o.s. into a joblanzarse a hacer un trabajo
to fling off/on one's clothesquitarse/ponerse la ropa de prisa
fling away VT + ADV (fig) (= waste) [+ money, chance] → desperdiciar
fling out VT + ADV [+ rubbish] → tirar, botar (LAm); [+ remark] → lanzar; [+ person] → echar

fling

[ˈflɪŋ]
vt [flung] (pt, pp) → jeter, lancer
He flung the dictionary onto the floor → Il a jeté le dictionnaire par terre.
to fling o.s. to the floor → se jeter à terre
to fling one's arms round sb → se jeter au cou de qn
n
(= love affair) → brève liaison f, passade f
a last fling, a final fling (= last bit of fun) → une dernière folie

fling

vb: pret, ptp <flung>
n
(= act of flinging)Wurf m, → Schleudern nt no pl
(fig inf)Anlauf m; to give something a flingsich an etw (dat)versuchen, etw (aus)probieren; youth must have its flingdie Jugend muss sich austoben; to have a fling (= enjoy oneself)sich austoben; to have a last or final flingsich noch einmal richtig austoben
(inf: = relationship) to have a fling (with somebody)eine Affäre (mit jdm) haben, etwas mit jdm haben (inf)
vt (lit, fig)schleudern; to fling the window opendas Fenster aufstoßen; the door was flung opendie Tür flog auf; to fling one’s arms round somebody’s neckjdm die Arme um den Hals werfen; she flung herself into his armssie warf sich in seine Arme; to fling a coat round one’s shoulderssich (dat)einen Mantel über die Schulter(n) werfen; to fling oneself into a tasksich in eine Aufgabe stürzen; to fling oneself out of the window/off a bridgesich aus dem Fenster/von einer Brücke stürzen; to fling oneself into a chair/to the groundsich in einen Sessel/auf den Boden werfen; you shouldn’t just fling yourself at him (fig inf)du solltest dich ihm nicht so an den Hals werfen

fling

[flɪŋ] (flung (vb: pt, pp))
1. n (love affair) → avventura
to have a last fling → fare un'ultima follia
to have one's fling → godersela
to have a fling at doing sth → cercare or tentare di fare qc
2. vt (stone) → lanciare, gettare, scagliare
to fling one's arms round sb → gettare le braccia al collo di qn
the door was flung open → la porta fu spalancata
to fling o.s. into a chair → buttarsi su una poltrona
to fling o.s. into a job → gettarsi a capofitto in un lavoro
to fling on one's clothes → vestirsi in fretta e furia
fling away vt + adv (waste) → gettare via, sperperare
fling off vt + advtogliersi in fretta e furia
fling on vt + adv (clothes) → mettersi in fretta e furia
fling out vt + adv (unwanted object) → buttare via; (person) → buttar fuori
fling up vt + advlanciare in aria
to fling up one's arms → alzare le braccia al cielo
she flung up her head → ha buttato la testa all'indietro

fling

(fliŋ) past tense, past participle flung (flaŋ) verb
1. to throw with great force. He flung a brick through the window.
2. to rush. He flung out of the house.
noun
a lively Scottish dance. They danced a Highland fling.

fling

يَطْرَحُ mrštit kaste schleudern εκσφενδονίζω lanzar heittää jeter baciti lanciare 投げ飛ばす 던지다 smijten slynge rzucić arremessar швырнуть kasta ขว้าง savurmak quăng 猛冲
References in classic literature ?
And Jo looked quite ready to fling cold water on the slightest provocation.
I guess I want to have my fling, like the other girls.
And then it is a wretched thought that you should fling away your young days in a place like this.
The truth seems to be, however, that when he casts his leaves forth upon the wind, the author addresses, not the many who will fling aside his volume, or never take it up, but the few who will understand him better than most of his schoolmates or lifemates.
Whereupon planting his feet firmly against two opposite planks of the boat, the gigantic negro, stooping a little, presented his flat palm to Flask's foot, and then putting Flask's hand on his hearse-plumed head and bidding him spring as he himself should toss, with one dexterous fling landed the little man high and dry on his shoulders.
I rejoice in my spine, as in the firm audacious staff of that flag which I fling half out to the world.
I only mean to say that for a young horse full of strength and spirits, who has been used to some large field or plain where he can fling up his head and toss up his tail and gallop away at full speed, then round and back again with a snort to his companions -- I say it is hard never to have a bit more liberty to do as you like.
She was so sensitive--she was not fitted for such a life as this; and a hundred times a day, when he thought of her, he would clench his hands and fling himself again at the task before him.
Well, it was touching to see the queen blush and smile, and look embarrassed and happy, and fling fur- tive glances at Sir Launcelot that would have got him shot in Arkansas, to a dead certainty.
Many people say that for a male person, bric-a-brac hunting is about as robust a business as making doll-clothes, or decorating Japanese pots with decalcomanie butterflies would be, and these people fling mud at the elegant Englishman, Byng, who wrote a book called THE BRIC-A-BRAC HUNTER, and make fun of him for chasing around after what they choose to call "his despicable trifles"; and for "gushing" over these trifles; and for exhibiting his "deep infantile delight" in what they call his "tuppenny collection of beggarly trivialities"; and for beginning his book with a picture of himself seated, in a "sappy, self-complacent attitude, in the midst of his poor little ridiculous bric-a-brac junk shop.
He says, every now and then in his sermons, that the first thing he does when he gets to heaven, will be to fling his arms around Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and kiss them and weep on them.
I will fling a hint at it from the stump on the polling day.

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