flit


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flit

 (flĭt)
intr.v. flit·ted, flit·ting, flits
1. To move about rapidly and nimbly.
2. To move quickly from one condition or location to another.
n.
1. A fluttering or darting movement.
2. Informal An empty-headed, silly, often erratic person.

[Middle English flitten, from Old Norse flytja, to carry about, convey; see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]

flit′ter n.

flit

(flɪt)
vb (intr) , flits, flitting or flitted
1. to move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart
2. to fly rapidly and lightly; flutter
3. to pass quickly; fleet: a memory flitted into his mind.
4. dialect Scot and Northern English to move house
5. informal Brit to depart hurriedly and stealthily in order to avoid obligations
6. an informal word for elope
n
7. the act or an instance of flitting
8. slang chiefly US a male homosexual
9. informal Brit a hurried and stealthy departure in order to avoid obligations (esp in the phrase do a flit)
[C12: from Old Norse flytja to carry]
ˈflitter n

flit

(flɪt)

v. flit•ted, flit•ting,
n. v.i.
1. to fly or move swiftly, lightly, or irregularly from one place or thing to another.
2. to flutter, as a bird.
3. to pass quickly: A smile flitted across his face.
n.
4. a light, swift movement; flutter.
5. Slang: Disparaging and Offensive. (a contemptuous term used to refer to a male homosexual.)
6. Brit. Informal. a hasty and stealthy departure.
[1150–1200; Middle English < Old Norse flytja to carry, convey. See fleet2]
flit′ting•ly, adv.
usage: Definition 8 is a slur and must be avoided. It is used with disparaging intent and is perceived as insulting.

Flit

 of dancers: a company of male dancers—Lipton, 1970.

flit


Past participle: flitted
Gerund: flitting

Imperative
flit
flit
Present
I flit
you flit
he/she/it flits
we flit
you flit
they flit
Preterite
I flitted
you flitted
he/she/it flitted
we flitted
you flitted
they flitted
Present Continuous
I am flitting
you are flitting
he/she/it is flitting
we are flitting
you are flitting
they are flitting
Present Perfect
I have flitted
you have flitted
he/she/it has flitted
we have flitted
you have flitted
they have flitted
Past Continuous
I was flitting
you were flitting
he/she/it was flitting
we were flitting
you were flitting
they were flitting
Past Perfect
I had flitted
you had flitted
he/she/it had flitted
we had flitted
you had flitted
they had flitted
Future
I will flit
you will flit
he/she/it will flit
we will flit
you will flit
they will flit
Future Perfect
I will have flitted
you will have flitted
he/she/it will have flitted
we will have flitted
you will have flitted
they will have flitted
Future Continuous
I will be flitting
you will be flitting
he/she/it will be flitting
we will be flitting
you will be flitting
they will be flitting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been flitting
you have been flitting
he/she/it has been flitting
we have been flitting
you have been flitting
they have been flitting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been flitting
you will have been flitting
he/she/it will have been flitting
we will have been flitting
you will have been flitting
they will have been flitting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been flitting
you had been flitting
he/she/it had been flitting
we had been flitting
you had been flitting
they had been flitting
Conditional
I would flit
you would flit
he/she/it would flit
we would flit
you would flit
they would flit
Past Conditional
I would have flitted
you would have flitted
he/she/it would have flitted
we would have flitted
you would have flitted
they would have flitted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flit - a sudden quick movementflit - a sudden quick movement    
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
2.flit - a secret move (to avoid paying debts); "they did a moonlight flit"
move, relocation - the act of changing your residence or place of business; "they say that three moves equal one fire"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Verb1.flit - move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart; "The hummingbird flitted among the branches"
butterfly - flutter like a butterfly
hurry, travel rapidly, zip, speed - move very fast; "The runner zipped past us at breakneck speed"

flit

verb fly, dash, dart, skim, pass, speed, wing, flash, fleet, whisk, flutter the bird that flits from tree to tree

flit

verb
2. To move quickly, lightly, and irregularly like a bird in flight:
3. To move through the air with or as if with wings:
Translations
يَنْتَقِل، يَمُر بِسُرْعَه
poletovat
flagreflyvesuse
röpköd
flögra, flökta
skrajojimasskrajoti
laidelētieslidināties
poletovať
uç mak

flit

[flɪt]
A. VI [bat, butterfly] → revolotear
to flit in/out [person] → entrar/salir precipitadamente
she flits from one job to anothersalta de un trabajo a otro
B. N to do a (moonlight) flit (Brit) → marcharse de una casa a la francesa

flit

[ˈflɪt] vi
(restlessly) to flit from place to place → passer d'un endroit à un autre
to flit between subjects → virevolter d'un sujet à un autre
(= pass) to flit from branch to branch [bird] → voleter de branche en branche
to flit across sb's face [expression, smile] → traverser le visage de qn
to flit through sb's mind [idea, memory] → traverser l'esprit de qn

flit

vi
(bats, butterflies etc)flattern, huschen; (ghost, person, image)huschen; to flit in and out (person)rein- und rausflitzen; an idea flitted through my mindein Gedanke schoss mir or huschte mir durch den Kopf
(Brit, = move house secretly) → bei Nacht und Nebel ausziehen, sich bei Nacht und Nebel davonmachen
(Scot, N Engl: = move house) → umziehen
n (Brit) to do a (moonlight) flitbei Nacht und Nebel umziehen

flit

[flɪt]
1. vi (bats, butterflies) → svolazzare
to flit in/out (person) → entrare/uscire svolazzando
2. n (Brit) to do a (moonlight) flitsquagliarsela (per non pagare l'affitto, il conto in albergo)

flit

(flit) past tense, past participle ˈflitted verb
to move quickly and lightly from place to place. Butterflies flitted around in the garden.
ˈflitting noun
References in classic literature ?
She seemed rather an airy sprite, which, after playing its fantastic sports for a little while upon the cottage floor, would flit away with a mocking smile.
I flit from court to court at my own free will and pleasure, and am always welcome.
The boys gazed awhile, half expecting to see a blue light flit past a window; then talking in a low tone, as befitted the time and the circumstances, they struck far off to the right, to give the haunted house a wide berth, and took their way homeward through the woods that adorned the rearward side of Cardiff Hill.
Yes, yes, he's rich enough to live in a finer house than this: but he's very near - close-handed; and, if he had meant to flit to Thrushcross Grange, as soon as he heard of a good tenant he could not have borne to miss the chance of getting a few hundreds more.
As he went out into the rigorous night, I saw the lonely figure flit away before us.
Truly it was impossible to dissociate her presence from all those wretched hankerings after money and gentility that had disturbed my boyhood - from all those ill-regulated aspirations that had first made me ashamed of home and Joe - from all those visions that had raised her face in the glowing fire, struck it out of the iron on the anvil, extracted it from the darkness of night to look in at the wooden window of the forge and flit away.
No longer shall her little silken figure flit up and down your quiet staircases, no more deck out your silent rooms with flowers, humming the while some happy little song.
O Tybalt, love, Tybalt, awake me not yet, Around my soft pillow while softer dreams flit, For what are the joys that in waking we prove, Compared with these visions, O, Tybalt, my love?
But soon the anchor was short up; soon it was hanging dripping at the bows; soon the sails began to draw, and the land and shipping to flit by on either side; and before I could lie down to snatch an hour of slumber the HISPANIOLA had begun her voyage to the Isle of Treasure.
The sky seems more transparent there, and the sun shines with a strange brilliancy, and a delightful grove of green leafy trees presents itself to the eyes and charms the sight with its verdure, while the ear is soothed by the sweet untutored melody of the countless birds of gay plumage that flit to and fro among the interlacing branches.
The airy phantoms that flit before the distempered imaginations of some of its adversaries would quickly give place to the more substantial forms of dangers, real, certain, and formidable.
It is part of the martyrdom which I endure for the cause of the Truth that there are seasons of mental weakness, when Cubes and Spheres flit away into the background of scarce-possible existences; when the Land of Three Dimensions seems almost as visionary as the Land of One or None; nay, when even this hard wall that bars me from my freedom, these very tablets on which I am writing, and all the substantial realities of Flatland itself, appear no better than the offspring of a diseased imagination, or the baseless fabric of a dream.