flock


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flock 1

 (flŏk)
n.
1. A group of animals that live, travel, or feed together.
2. A group of people under the leadership of one person, especially the members of a church.
3. A large crowd or number: a flock of visitors; a flock of questions. See Synonyms at crowd1.
intr.v. flocked, flock·ing, flocks
To gather or travel in a flock or crowd.

[Middle English flok, from Old English floc.]

flock 2

 (flŏk)
n.
1. A tuft, as of fiber or hair.
2. Waste wool or cotton used for stuffing furniture and mattresses.
3. Pulverized wool or felt that is applied to paper, cloth, or metal to produce a texture or pattern.
4. See floccule.
tr.v. flocked, flock·ing, flocks
1. To stuff with waste wool or cotton.
2. To texture or pattern with pulverized wool or felt.

[Middle English flok, from Old French floc, from Latin floccus, tuft of wool.]

flock

(flɒk)
n (sometimes functioning as plural)
1. a group of animals of one kind, esp sheep or birds
2. a large number of people; crowd
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a body of Christians regarded as the pastoral charge of a priest, a bishop, the pope, etc
4. rare a band of people; group
vb (intr)
5. to gather together or move in a flock
6. to go in large numbers: people flocked to the church.
[Old English flocc; related to Old Norse flokkr crowd, Middle Low German vlocke]

flock

(flɒk)
n
1. a tuft, as of wool, hair, cotton, etc
2. (Furniture)
a. waste from fabrics such as cotton, wool, or other cloth used for stuffing mattresses, upholstered chairs, etc
b. (as modifier): flock mattress.
3. (Textiles) very small tufts of wool applied to fabrics, wallpaper, etc, to give a raised pattern
4. (Chemistry) another word for floccule
vb
(tr) to fill, cover, or ornament with flock
[C13: from Old French floc, from Latin floccus; probably related to Old High German floccho down, Norwegian flugsa snowflake]
ˈflocky adj

flock1

(flɒk)

n.
1. an assemblage of animals, esp. sheep, goats, or birds, that live, travel, or feed together.
2. a large group of people or things: flocks of sightseers.
3. a single congregation in relation to its pastor.
v.i.
4. to gather or go in a flock: They flocked around the football hero.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English floc; c. Old Norse flokkr]
flock′less, adj.
usage: See collective noun.

flock2

(flɒk)

n.
1. a tuft of wool, hair, cotton, etc.
2. (sometimes used with a pl. v.) wool refuse, shearings of cloth, or old cloth torn to pieces.
3. Also called flocking. (sometimes used with a pl. v.) finely powdered wool or cloth used for producing a velvetlike pattern on wallpaper.
v.t.
4. to stuff with flock.
5. to decorate or coat with flock.
[1250–1300; Middle English flok < Old French floc < Latin floccus tuft of wool]
flock′y, adj. flock•i•er, flock•i•est.

Flock

 a company of people, birds, or animals; a group of Christians who worship together. See also bevy, drove.
Examples: flock of acquaintances; of affections, 1601; of auks [at sea]; of bats; of birds; of bitterns; of bustards; of camels, 1839; of Christians; of coots; of cotton, 1756; of cranes; of ducks [flying in a line]; of elephants, 1614; of fish, 1480; of friends; of geese [on the ground], 1596; of goats; of hens, 1690; of interpreters, 1581; of lice; of pamphlets, 1642; of parrots; of prophets; of seals; of sheep, 1340; of ships [book title by B. Callison]; of swifts; of wool, 1440.

flock


Past participle: flocked
Gerund: flocking

Imperative
flock
flock
Present
I flock
you flock
he/she/it flocks
we flock
you flock
they flock
Preterite
I flocked
you flocked
he/she/it flocked
we flocked
you flocked
they flocked
Present Continuous
I am flocking
you are flocking
he/she/it is flocking
we are flocking
you are flocking
they are flocking
Present Perfect
I have flocked
you have flocked
he/she/it has flocked
we have flocked
you have flocked
they have flocked
Past Continuous
I was flocking
you were flocking
he/she/it was flocking
we were flocking
you were flocking
they were flocking
Past Perfect
I had flocked
you had flocked
he/she/it had flocked
we had flocked
you had flocked
they had flocked
Future
I will flock
you will flock
he/she/it will flock
we will flock
you will flock
they will flock
Future Perfect
I will have flocked
you will have flocked
he/she/it will have flocked
we will have flocked
you will have flocked
they will have flocked
Future Continuous
I will be flocking
you will be flocking
he/she/it will be flocking
we will be flocking
you will be flocking
they will be flocking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been flocking
you have been flocking
he/she/it has been flocking
we have been flocking
you have been flocking
they have been flocking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been flocking
you will have been flocking
he/she/it will have been flocking
we will have been flocking
you will have been flocking
they will have been flocking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been flocking
you had been flocking
he/she/it had been flocking
we had been flocking
you had been flocking
they had been flocking
Conditional
I would flock
you would flock
he/she/it would flock
we would flock
you would flock
they would flock
Past Conditional
I would have flocked
you would have flocked
he/she/it would have flocked
we would have flocked
you would have flocked
they would have flocked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flock - a church congregation guided by a pastor
congregation, faithful, fold - a group of people who adhere to a common faith and habitually attend a given church
2.flock - a group of birds
bird - warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings
bevy - a flock of birds (especially when gathered close together on the ground); "we were visited at breakfast by a bevy of excited ducks"
covert - a flock of coots
covey - a small flock of grouse or partridge
exaltation - a flock of larks (especially a flock of larks in flight overhead)
gaggle - a flock of geese
wisp - a flock of snipe
animal group - a group of animals
flight - a flock of flying birds
3.flock - (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extentflock - (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent; "a batch of letters"; "a deal of trouble"; "a lot of money"; "he made a mint on the stock market"; "see the rest of the winners in our huge passel of photos"; "it must have cost plenty"; "a slew of journalists"; "a wad of money"
large indefinite amount, large indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is above the average in size or magnitude
deluge, flood, inundation, torrent - an overwhelming number or amount; "a flood of requests"; "a torrent of abuse"
haymow - a mass of hay piled up in a barn for preservation
4.flock - an orderly crowdflock - an orderly crowd; "a troop of children"
crowd - a large number of things or people considered together; "a crowd of insects assembled around the flowers"
5.flock - a group of sheep or goats
sheep - woolly usually horned ruminant mammal related to the goat
animal group - a group of animals
Verb1.flock - move as a crowd or in a group; "Tourists flocked to the shrine where the statue was said to have shed tears"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
2.flock - come together as in a cluster or flock; "The poets constellate in this town every summer"
huddle, huddle together - crowd or draw together; "let's huddle together--it's cold!"
bunch, bunch together, bunch up - form into a bunch; "The frightened children bunched together in the corner of the classroom"
foregather, forgather, gather, assemble, meet - collect in one place; "We assembled in the church basement"; "Let's gather in the dining room"

flock

noun
1. herd, group, flight, drove, colony, gaggle, skein They kept a small flock of sheep.
verb
1. stream, crowd, mass, swarm, throng The public have flocked to the show.
2. gather, group, crowd, mass, collect, assemble, herd, huddle, converge, throng, congregate, troop The crowds flocked around her.

flock

noun
1. An enormous number of persons gathered together:
2. A very large number of things grouped together:
verb
To congregate, as around a person:
Translations
سِرْبيَتَوافَد، يَذْهَبون معا في جماعات
ято
stádohejnoshromáždit se
flokgå i flokmyldresværm
ŝafaro
laumapäällystääparvivanukatras
jatostado
nyájösszesereglikpamatpiheraj
flokkurflykkjast, hópasthjörî, flokkurhópur
群れ
무리
bandabūriais eitibūriais rinktispulkas
barsdrūzmētiesganāmpulkspulcēties
jatačreda
јато
flockfolkmassahop
เฮฝูงฝูงสัตว์หมู่
sürüakın akın gitmekakın etmek
đàn

flock

1 [flɒk]
A. N [of sheep, goats] → rebaño m; [of birds] → bandada f; [of people] → tropel m, multitud f (Rel) → grey f, rebaño m
they came in flocksacudieron en tropel
B. VI (= move in numbers) → ir en tropel
they flocked to the stationfueron en tropel hacia la estación
to flock around sbapiñarse en torno a algn
to flock togethercongregarse, reunirse

flock

2 [flɒk] N (= wool) → borra f

flock

[ˈflɒk]
n
[sheep] → troupeau m
a flock of sheep → un troupeau de moutons
[birds] → vol m
a flock of birds → un vol d'oiseaux
[people] → foule f
a flock of → une foule de
flocks of journalists → une foule de journalistes
vi
to flock to sth → venir en masse à qch
to flock to see sth → affluer pour voir qch

flock

1
n
(of sheep, geese, also Eccl) → Herde f; (of birds)Schwarm m, → Schar f
(of people)Schar f, → Haufen m (inf)
viin Scharen kommen; to flock inhineinströmen or -drängen; to flock outhinausströmen or -drängen; to flock around somebodysich um jdn scharen or drängen

flock

2
n (Tex) → Flocke f

flock

[flɒk]
1. n (of sheep) (also Rel) → gregge m; (of birds) → stormo; (of people) → stuolo, folla
2. vi (crowd) → affollarsi, ammassarsi
to flock around sb → affollarsi intorno a qn

flock

(flok) noun
a number of certain animals or birds together. a flock of sheep.
verb
(with to, ~into etc) to gather or go somewhere together in a group or crowd. People flocked to the cinema.

flock

سِرْب stádo flok Herde κοπάδι rebaño lauma troupeau stado gregge 群れ 무리 kudde flokk stado rebanho стая flock ฝูงสัตว์ sürü đàn
References in classic literature ?
caused a momentary flurry, which was hardly over when a flock of cousins arrived, and `the party came in', as Beth used to say when a child.
When they had gone along in silence for a long way they stopped at the edge of a field where a flock of sheep were grazing.
Dimmesdale's flock, were alike importunate that he should make trial of the physician's frankly offered skill.
Had these leviathans been but a flock of simple sheep, pursued over the pasture by three fierce wolves, they could not possibly have evinced such excessive dismay.
And then finally, when election day came, the packing houses posted a notice that men who desired to vote might remain away until nine that morning, and the same night watchman took Jurgis and the rest of his flock into the back room of a saloon, and showed each of them where and how to mark a ballot, and then gave each two dollars, and took them to the polling place, where there was a policeman on duty especially to see that they got through all right.
This personage had been exerting himself, with great alacrity, in driving all the flock of domestics to the other end of the verandah.
Not a flock of wild geese cackles over our town, but it to some extent unsettles the value of real estate here, and, if I were a broker, I should probably take that disturbance into account.
Pretty soon, various kinds of bugs and ants and worms and things began to flock in out of the wet and crawl down in- side my armor to get warm; and while some of them behaved well enough, and snuggled up amongst my clothes and got quiet, the majority were of a restless, uncomfortable sort, and never stayed still, but went on prowling and hunting for they did not know what; especially the ants, which went tickling along in wearisome procession from one end of me to the other by the hour, and are a kind of creatures which I never wish to sleep with again.
All summer long the tourists flock to that church about six o'clock in the evening, and pay their franc, and listen to the noise.
Then the people begun to flock in, and the beats and the girls took seats in the front row at the head of the coffin, and for a half an hour the people filed around slow, in single rank, and looked down at the dead man's face a minute, and some dropped in a tear, and it was all very still and solemn, only the girls and the beats holding handkerchiefs to their eyes and keep- ing their heads bent, and sobbing a little.
Why, Captain, just think of this: if Abraham was to set his foot down here by this door, there would be a railing set up around that foot-track right away, and a shelter put over it, and people would flock here from all over heaven, for hundreds and hundreds of years, to look at it.
We had on board the sloop a large flock of sheep; and after aiding in driving them to the slaughterhouse of Mr.