florid


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flor·id

 (flôr′ĭd, flŏr′-)
adj.
1. Flushed with rosy color; ruddy.
2. Very ornate; flowery: a florid prose style.
3. Archaic Healthy.
4. Obsolete Abounding in or covered with flowers.

[French floride, from Latin flōridus, from flōs, flōr-, flower; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

flo·rid′i·ty (flə-rĭd′ĭ-tē, flô-), flor′id·ness n.
flor′id·ly adv.

florid

(ˈflɒrɪd)
adj
1. having a red or flushed complexion
2. excessively ornate; flowery: florid architecture.
3. an archaic word for flowery
[C17: from Latin flōridus blooming]
floˈridity, ˈfloridness n
ˈfloridly adv

flor•id

(ˈflɔr ɪd, ˈflɒr-)

adj.
1. reddish; ruddy.
2. flowery; excessively ornate: florid writing.
3. Obs. abounding in or consisting of flowers.
[1635–45; < Latin flōridus, derivative of flōr(ēre) to bloom]
flo•rid•i•ty (flɔˈrɪd ɪ ti, flə-) flor′id•ness, n.
flor′id•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.florid - elaborately or excessively ornamented; "flamboyant handwriting"; "the senator's florid speech"
fancy - not plain; decorative or ornamented; "fancy handwriting"; "fancy clothes"
2.florid - inclined to a healthy reddish color often associated with outdoor life; "a ruddy complexion"; "Santa's rubicund cheeks"; "a fresh and sanguine complexion"
healthy - having or indicating good health in body or mind; free from infirmity or disease; "a rosy healthy baby"; "staying fit and healthy"

florid

adjective
1. flowery, high-flown, figurative, grandiloquent, euphuistic a greed for adjectives and florid writing
2. ornate, busy, flamboyant, baroque, fussy, embellished, flowery, overelaborate the cast-iron fireplace and the florid ceiling
ornate plain, bare, dull, unadorned
3. flushed, ruddy, rubicund, high-coloured, high-complexioned, blowsy He was a stout, florid man.
flushed pale, washed out, wan, pasty, bloodless, pallid, anaemic

florid

adjective
1. Of a healthy reddish color:
2. Elaborately and heavily ornamented:
Translations

florid

[ˈflɒrɪd] ADJ [complexion] → colorado, rubicundo; [style] → florido

florid

[ˈflɒrɪd] adj
[complexion] → rubicond(e)
[style] → très chargé(e)

florid

adj
(usu pej: = ornate) languageblumig, schwülstig (pej); wallpaper, tieüberladen; music, architecturereich verziert
(= ruddy) personrotgesichtig; face, complexiongerötet

florid

[ˈflɔːrɪd] adj (complexion) → florido/a; (style) → fiorito/a

flor·id

a. florido-a; encarnado-a; de color rojo vivo.
References in classic literature ?
The next passenger who got up and placed himself by my side was a florid, excitable, confused-looking gentleman, excessively talkative and familiar.
Sessions and Old Bailey had now to summon their favourite, specially, to their longing arms; and shouldering itself towards the visage of the Lord Chief Justice in the Court of King's Bench, the florid countenance of Mr.
Barrington was a large, florid man, well built and well set up.
He was a florid man, with sandy hair and a large sandy moustache; from the middle of his watch-chain hung a bunch of football medals.
Florid, with white hair, the face of an old Jupiter, and the figure of an old fox-hunter, he enlivened the vale of Thyme from end to end on his big, cantering chestnut.
He was a man obviously on the way towards sixty, very florid and hairy, with much gray in his bushy whiskers and thick curly hair, a stoutish body which showed to disadvantage the somewhat worn joinings of his clothes, and the air of a swaggerer, who would aim at being noticeable even at a show of fireworks, regarding his own remarks on any other person's performance as likely to be more interesting than the performance itself.
Out at the window a florid moon was peering over dark roofs, and in the distance the waters of a river glimmered pallidly.
It had, indeed, very little of feminine in it, and would have become a man at least as well as a woman; for, to say the truth, youth and florid health had a very considerable share in the composition.
Well, I have never set up for a man of the world, though sometimes when I have heard the Lovelaces of the day hinting mysteriously at their secret sins or boasting of their florid gallantries, I have remembered the last verse of Suckling's "Ballad of a Wedding," which, no doubt, the reader knows as well as I, and if not, it will increase his acquaintance with our brave old poetry to look it up.
Even on Sunday, when it veiled its more florid charms and lay comparatively empty of passage, the street shone out in contrast to its dingy neighbourhood, like a fire in a forest; and with its freshly painted shutters, well-polished brasses, and general cleanliness and gaiety of note, instantly caught and pleased the eye of the passenger.
The solitary exception was the New Church; a stuccoed edifice with a square steeple over the door, terminating in four short pinnacles like florid wooden legs.
Tall, stout, and upright -- with bright blue eyes, and healthy, florid complexion -- his brown plush shooting-jacket carelessly buttoned awry; his vixenish little Scotch terrier barking unrebuked at his heels; one hand thrust into his waistcoat pocket, and the other smacking the banisters cheerfully as he came downstairs humming a tune -- Mr.