florid


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to florid: innocuous, fluoride, appropriate, subsequent

flor·id

 (flôr′ĭd, flŏr′-)
adj.
1. Flushed with rosy color; ruddy.
2. Very ornate; flowery: a florid prose style.
3. Archaic Healthy.
4. Obsolete Abounding in or covered with flowers.

[French floride, from Latin flōridus, from flōs, flōr-, flower; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

flo·rid′i·ty (flə-rĭd′ĭ-tē, flô-), flor′id·ness n.
flor′id·ly adv.

florid

(ˈflɒrɪd)
adj
1. having a red or flushed complexion
2. excessively ornate; flowery: florid architecture.
3. an archaic word for flowery
[C17: from Latin flōridus blooming]
floˈridity, ˈfloridness n
ˈfloridly adv

flor•id

(ˈflɔr ɪd, ˈflɒr-)

adj.
1. reddish; ruddy.
2. flowery; excessively ornate: florid writing.
3. Obs. abounding in or consisting of flowers.
[1635–45; < Latin flōridus, derivative of flōr(ēre) to bloom]
flo•rid•i•ty (flɔˈrɪd ɪ ti, flə-) flor′id•ness, n.
flor′id•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.florid - elaborately or excessively ornamented; "flamboyant handwriting"; "the senator's florid speech"
fancy - not plain; decorative or ornamented; "fancy handwriting"; "fancy clothes"
2.florid - inclined to a healthy reddish color often associated with outdoor life; "a ruddy complexion"; "Santa's rubicund cheeks"; "a fresh and sanguine complexion"
healthy - having or indicating good health in body or mind; free from infirmity or disease; "a rosy healthy baby"; "staying fit and healthy"

florid

adjective
1. flowery, high-flown, figurative, grandiloquent, euphuistic a greed for adjectives and florid writing
2. ornate, busy, flamboyant, baroque, fussy, embellished, flowery, overelaborate the cast-iron fireplace and the florid ceiling
ornate plain, bare, dull, unadorned
3. flushed, ruddy, rubicund, high-coloured, high-complexioned, blowsy He was a stout, florid man.
flushed pale, washed out, wan, pasty, bloodless, pallid, anaemic

florid

adjective
1. Of a healthy reddish color:
2. Elaborately and heavily ornamented:
Translations

florid

[ˈflɒrɪd] ADJ [complexion] → colorado, rubicundo; [style] → florido

florid

[ˈflɒrɪd] adj
[complexion] → rubicond(e)
[style] → très chargé(e)

florid

adj
(usu pej: = ornate) languageblumig, schwülstig (pej); wallpaper, tieüberladen; music, architecturereich verziert
(= ruddy) personrotgesichtig; face, complexiongerötet

florid

[ˈflɔːrɪd] adj (complexion) → florido/a; (style) → fiorito/a

flor·id

a. florido-a; encarnado-a; de color rojo vivo.
References in classic literature ?
The outside pattern is a florid arabesque, reminding one of a fungus.
With his florid cheek, his compact figure smartly arrayed in a bright-buttoned blue coat, his brisk and vigorous step, and his hale and hearty aspect, altogether he seemed -- not young, indeed -- but a kind of new contrivance of Mother Nature in the shape of man, whom age and infirmity had no business to touch.
He was a smooth and florid personage, elegantly dressed, and he spoke their language freely, which gave him a great advantage in dealing with them.
Tall, stout, and upright -- with bright blue eyes, and healthy, florid complexion -- his brown plush shooting-jacket carelessly buttoned awry; his vixenish little Scotch terrier barking unrebuked at his heels; one hand thrust into his waistcoat pocket, and the other smacking the banisters cheerfully as he came downstairs humming a tune -- Mr.
Sessions and Old Bailey had now to summon their favourite, specially, to their longing arms; and shouldering itself towards the visage of the Lord Chief Justice in the Court of King's Bench, the florid countenance of Mr.
The unbroken stillness of the parlour window leading me to infer, after a while, that she was not there, I lifted up my eyes to the window above it, where I saw a florid, pleasant-looking gentleman, with a grey head, who shut up one eye in a grotesque manner, nodded his head at me several times, shook it at me as often, laughed, and went away.
Well, I have never set up for a man of the world, though sometimes when I have heard the Lovelaces of the day hinting mysteriously at their secret sins or boasting of their florid gallantries, I have remembered the last verse of Suckling's "Ballad of a Wedding," which, no doubt, the reader knows as well as I, and if not, it will increase his acquaintance with our brave old poetry to look it up.
Hence she, thinking him still in earnest when he had swerved into florid romance, had been dangerously misled.
The screen was an old one, of gilt Spanish leather, stamped and wrought with a rather florid Louis-Quatorze pattern.
Even on Sunday, when it veiled its more florid charms and lay comparatively empty of passage, the street shone out in contrast to its dingy neighbourhood, like a fire in a forest; and with its freshly painted shutters, well-polished brasses, and general cleanliness and gaiety of note, instantly caught and pleased the eye of the passenger.
Florid, with white hair, the face of an old Jupiter, and the figure of an old fox-hunter, he enlivened the vale of Thyme from end to end on his big, cantering chestnut.
They were not simple, vulgar, unmeaning ornaments, such as the uncultivated seize upon with avidity on account of their florid appearance, but well devised drawings, that were replete with taste and thought, and afforded some apology for the otherwise senseless luxury contemplated, by aiding in refining the imagination, and cultivating the intellect.