flounder


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floun·der 1

 (floun′dər)
intr.v. floun·dered, floun·der·ing, floun·ders
1. To move clumsily or with little progress, as through water or mud. See Synonyms at blunder.
2. To act or function in a confused or directionless manner; struggle: "Some ... floundered professionally, never quite deciding what they wanted to do" (Steve Olson). See Usage Note at founder1.
n.
The act of floundering.

[Probably alteration of founder.]

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flounder2
peacock flounder
Bothus mancus

floun·der 2

 (floun′dər)
n. pl. flounder or floun·ders
Any of various marine flatfishes chiefly of the families Bothidae and Pleuronectidae, including several important food fishes.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman floundre, of Scandinavian origin; see plat- in Indo-European roots.]

flounder

(ˈflaʊndə)
vb (intr)
1. to struggle; to move with difficulty, as in mud
2. to behave awkwardly; make mistakes
n
the act of floundering
[C16: probably a blend of founder2 + blunder; perhaps influenced by flounder2]
Usage: Flounder is sometimes wrongly used where founder is meant: the project foundered (not floundered) because of a lack of funds

flounder

(ˈflaʊndə)
n, pl -der or -ders
1. (Animals) Also called: fluke a European flatfish, Platichthys flesus having a greyish-brown body covered with prickly scales: family Pleuronectidae: an important food fish
2. (Animals) US and Canadian any flatfish of the families Bothidae (turbot, etc) and Pleuronectidae (plaice, halibut, sand dab, etc)
[C14: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse flythra, Norwegian flundra]

floun•der1

(ˈflaʊn dər)

v.i.
1. to struggle with stumbling or plunging movements: to flounder in the mud.
2. to struggle clumsily, helplessly, or falteringly: I floundered for an excuse.
[1570–80; perhaps b. flounce1 and founder2]
floun′der•ing•ly, adv.

floun•der2

(ˈflaʊn dər)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) -der, (esp. for kinds or species) -ders.
any of the flatfishes of the families Pleuronectidae and Bothidae, esp. those valued as food, as the North Atlantic Platichthys flesus (European flounder) and various plaices, soles, and turbots.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Anglo-French floundre < Scandinavian; compare Norwegian flundra]

flounder


Past participle: floundered
Gerund: floundering

Imperative
flounder
flounder
Present
I flounder
you flounder
he/she/it flounders
we flounder
you flounder
they flounder
Preterite
I floundered
you floundered
he/she/it floundered
we floundered
you floundered
they floundered
Present Continuous
I am floundering
you are floundering
he/she/it is floundering
we are floundering
you are floundering
they are floundering
Present Perfect
I have floundered
you have floundered
he/she/it has floundered
we have floundered
you have floundered
they have floundered
Past Continuous
I was floundering
you were floundering
he/she/it was floundering
we were floundering
you were floundering
they were floundering
Past Perfect
I had floundered
you had floundered
he/she/it had floundered
we had floundered
you had floundered
they had floundered
Future
I will flounder
you will flounder
he/she/it will flounder
we will flounder
you will flounder
they will flounder
Future Perfect
I will have floundered
you will have floundered
he/she/it will have floundered
we will have floundered
you will have floundered
they will have floundered
Future Continuous
I will be floundering
you will be floundering
he/she/it will be floundering
we will be floundering
you will be floundering
they will be floundering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been floundering
you have been floundering
he/she/it has been floundering
we have been floundering
you have been floundering
they have been floundering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been floundering
you will have been floundering
he/she/it will have been floundering
we will have been floundering
you will have been floundering
they will have been floundering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been floundering
you had been floundering
he/she/it had been floundering
we had been floundering
you had been floundering
they had been floundering
Conditional
I would flounder
you would flounder
he/she/it would flounder
we would flounder
you would flounder
they would flounder
Past Conditional
I would have floundered
you would have floundered
he/she/it would have floundered
we would have floundered
you would have floundered
they would have floundered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flounder - flesh of any of various American and European flatfishflounder - flesh of any of various American and European flatfish
flatfish - sweet lean whitish flesh of any of numerous thin-bodied fish; usually served as thin fillets
yellowtail flounder - flesh of American flounder having a yellowish tail
plaice - flesh of large European flatfish
turbot - flesh of a large European flatfish
sand dab - the lean flesh of a small flounder from the Pacific coast of North America
lemon sole, winter flounder - flesh of American flounder; important in the winter
2.flounder - any of various European and non-European marine flatfish
flatfish - any of several families of fishes having flattened bodies that swim along the sea floor on one side of the body with both eyes on the upper side
Verb1.flounder - walk with great difficulty; "He staggered along in the heavy snow"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
2.flounder - behave awkwardly; have difficulties; "She is floundering in college"
struggle, fight - make a strenuous or labored effort; "She struggled for years to survive without welfare"; "He fought for breath"

flounder

verb
1. falter, struggle, stall, slow down, run into trouble, come unstuck (informal), be in difficulties, hit a bad patch The economy was floundering.
2. dither, struggle, blunder, be confused, falter, be in the dark, be out of your depth The president is floundering, trying to jump-start his campaign.
3. struggle, struggle, toss, thrash, plunge, stumble, tumble, muddle, fumble, grope, wallow men floundering about in the water
Usage: Flounder is sometimes wrongly used where founder is meant: the project foundered (not floundered) because of lack of funds.

flounder

verb
1. To proceed or perform in an unsteady, faltering manner:
2. To move about in an indolent or clumsy manner:
Translations
يَتَخَبَّط في، يَغوص في الوَحِل
plácat se
fægte med arme og bensprælle
kampela
bukdácsollepényhal
flyîra
도다리
kapanotiskapstytis
ķepuroties
flądra
flundra
çırpınmak

flounder

1 [ˈflaʊndəʳ] N (flounder or flounders (pl)) (= fish) → platija f

flounder

2 [ˈflaʊndəʳ] VI
1. (also flounder about) (in water, mud etc) (= flap arms) → debatirse; (= splash) → revolcarse
2. (in speech etc) → perder el hilo

flounder

[ˈflaʊndər]
n (= fish) → flet m
vi (= fail) → battre de l'aile
to be floundering [person] (= lack direction and decision) → tourner en rond

flounder

1
n (= fish)Flunder f

flounder

2
vi
(lit)sich abstrampeln, sich abzappeln; a stranded whale floundering on the beachein gestrandeter Wal, der sich am Strand abquält; we floundered about in the mudwir quälten uns mühselig im Schlamm
(fig)sich abzappeln (inf), → sich abstrampeln (inf); the company/economy was flounderingder Firma/Wirtschaft ging es schlecht; his career flounderedmit seiner Karriere ging es abwärts; to start to flounderins Schwimmen kommen; to flounder through somethingsich durch etw wursteln or mogeln (inf); he floundered oner wurstelte weiter

flounder

1 [ˈflaʊndəʳ] vi (also flounder about) (in water, mud) → dibattersi, annaspare; (in speech) → impappinarsi, esitare

flounder

2 [flaʊndəʳ] n (fish) → passera di mare

flounder

(ˈflaundə) verb
to move one's legs and arms violently and with difficulty (in water, mud etc). She floundered helplessly in the mud.
References in classic literature ?
You do know, you dear thing," I replied; "only you haven't my dreadful boldness of mind, and you keep back, out of timidity and modesty and delicacy, even the impression that, in the past, when you had, without my aid, to flounder about in silence, most of all made you miserable.
Until this good genie should arrive, they could do no more than flounder ahead, and take whatever business was the nearest and the cheapest.
It would be very pretty if it were otherwise, but that's how we flounder.
But they were silent in amazement and expectation when they saw the mighty white ape wriggle upon the back of their king, and, with steel muscles tensed beneath the armpits of his antagonist, bear down mightily with his open palms upon the back of the thick bullneck, so that the king ape could but shriek in agony and flounder helplessly about upon the thick mat of jungle grass.
Nobs had followed us into the bog and had done fairly well at first, but when he neared us he too sank to his belly and could only flounder about.
He was beginning to flounder, and the hand that rested on the desk blotter was visibly trembling.
With Yellow Handkerchief at my legs and his two companions at my shoulders, they began to flounder along through the mud.
depreciate, the delicate fat Milton oyster, the plaice sound and firm, the flounder as much alive as when in the water, the shrimp as big as a prawn, the fine cod alive but a few hours ago, or any other of the various treasures which those water-deities who fish the sea and rivers have committed to the care of the nymphs, the angry Naiades lift up their immortal voices, and the prophane wretch is struck deaf for his impiety.
Dave refused to run quietly on the trail behind the sled, where the going was easy, but continued to flounder alongside in the soft snow, where the going was most difficult, till exhausted.
I am, however, afraid that most of us are fated to flounder for ever in the dead water of a pool whose shores are arid indeed.
At this Jukes lost his footing and began to flounder.
The insides scream dismally; the coach stops; the horses flounder; all the other six coaches stop; and their four-and-twenty horses flounder likewise: but merely for company, and in sympathy with ours.