fluently


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flu·ent

 (flo͞o′ənt)
adj.
1.
a. Able to express oneself readily and effortlessly: a fluent speaker; fluent in three languages.
b. Flowing effortlessly; polished: speaks fluent Russian; gave a fluent performance of the sonata.
2. Flowing or moving smoothly; graceful: a yacht with long, fluent curves.
3. Flowing or capable of flowing; fluid.

[Latin fluēns, fluent-, present participle of fluere, to flow; see bhleu- in Indo-European roots.]

flu′en·cy n.
flu′ent·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.fluently - in a fluent manner; "she speaks French fluently"
Translations
بِطَلاقَه
plynněplynule
flydende
folyékonyan
reiprennandi
plynulo
tekoče
akıcı bir şekilde

fluently

[ˈfluːəntlɪ] ADV
1. (= like a native) he speaks Russian fluentlyhabla ruso con fluidez or soltura, domina bien el ruso
2. (= without hesitation) [speak, write, read] → con fluidez, con soltura
3. (= gracefully) [dance, move] → con soltura, con fluidez

fluently

[ˈfluːəntli] adv
[speak foreign language] → couramment
[read, write, speak] → avec aisance, avec facilité

fluently

adv
speak, write (in a foreign language) → fließend; (in one’s native language) → flüssig; to communicate fluently in Hebrewsich fließend auf Hebräisch verständigen
(= moving freely) jump, playflüssig

fluently

[ˈfluːəntlɪ] adv (speak a language) → correntemente; (speak, write) → con scioltezza, con facilità

fluent

(ˈfluənt) adjective
1. (of a language etc) smoothly and skilfully spoken. He spoke fluent French.
2. (of a person) able to express oneself easily. He is fluent in English.
ˈfluency noun
ease in speaking or expressing. Her fluency surprised her colleagues.
ˈfluently adverb
He speaks Spanish fluently.
References in classic literature ?
This Professor Bumper did, being able to make himself understood in the queer part-Spanish dialect used by the native Hondurians, though he could not, of course, speak it as fluently as had Jacinto.
He was waited upon over the factory, shown the machinery by George, who, in high spirits, talked so fluently, held himself so erect, looked so handsome and manly, that his master began to feel an uneasy consciousness of inferiority.
Sergey Ivanovitch listened attentively, asked him questions, and, roused by a new listener, he talked fluently, uttered a few keen and weighty observations, respectfully appreciated by the young doctor, and was soon in that eager frame of mind his brother knew so well, which always, with him, followed a brilliant and eager conversation.
General conversation followed, and the twins drifted about from group to group, talking easily and fluently and winning approval, compelling admiration and achieving favor from all.
Then they oiled the corners of their mouths so that they might be able to speak more fluently.
Of course they were the most remarkable children ever born, as will be shown when I mention that they walked at eight months, talked fluently at twelve months, and at two years they took their places at table, and behaved with a propriety which charmed all beholders.
Her congratulations were warm and open; but Emma could not speak so fluently.
He could only say that he was sure that the Eggs would never flap about in such a manner; but as the boy who could speak robin so fluently was doing the thing with them, birds could be quite sure that the actions were not of a dangerous nature.
I knew it--as well as the German language--well enough to read it fluently, but not to speak it correctly.
Elizabeth, feeling all the more than common awkwardness and anxiety of his situation, now forced herself to speak; and immediately, though not very fluently, gave him to understand that her sentiments had undergone so material a change, since the period to which he alluded, as to make her receive with gratitude and pleasure his present assurances.
Beginning with spasmodic words, he went on to speak more and more fluently, more and more passionately, feeling her leaning towards him, listening with wonder like a child, with gratitude like a woman.
The nature of the process is truly characterized by Glaucon, when he describes himself as a companion who is not good for much in an investigation, but can see what he is shown, and may, perhaps, give the answer to a question more fluently than another.