flung


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flung

 (flŭng)
v.
Past tense and past participle of fling.

flung

(flʌŋ)
vb
the past tense and past participle of fling

fling

(flɪŋ)

v. flung, fling•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to throw or cast with force, violence, or abandon.
2. to move (oneself) violently or abruptly: She flung herself angrily from the room.
3. to put or send suddenly or without preparation: to fling someone into jail.
4. to project or speak sharply or aggressively.
5. to involve (oneself) vigorously in an undertaking.
6. to move, do, or say quickly.
7. to throw aside or off.
v.i.
8. to move with haste or violence.
9. to fly into violent and irregular motions, as a horse.
10. to speak harshly or abusively (usu. fol. by out).
n.
11. an act or instance of flinging.
12. a short period of unrestrained pursuit of one's desires.
13. an attempt at something: to have a fling at playwriting.
14. a lively Scottish dance.
[1250–1300; Middle English]
fling′er, n.
Translations

fling

(fliŋ) past tense, past participle flung (flaŋ) verb
1. to throw with great force. He flung a brick through the window.
2. to rush. He flung out of the house.
noun
a lively Scottish dance. They danced a Highland fling.
References in classic literature ?
He rose out of it into the arms of Cecco, who flung him to Smee, who flung him to Starkey, who flung him to Bill Jukes, who flung him to Noodler, and so he was tossed from one to another till he fell at the feet of the black pirate.
And at sound of the mate's voice the wild-dog flung quick-opened eyes in Jerry's direction and flashed into his burrow, where he immediately turned around, thrust his head out with a show of teeth, and snarled triumphant defiance.
If she hadn't time to dress, she merely flung off her apron and shot out of the kitchen door.
I flung myself into the chair again, and pressed my hands on my forehead.
It was a wonder that the men sent aloft were not flung off the yards, the yards not flung off the masts, the masts not flung overboard.
They were handed to her, and as there were many of them, she spared herself the staircase, and flung them down out of the window.
With an ominous perception that, as his departing footsteps echoed adown the staircase, the sway of Britain was passing forever from New England, he smote his clinched hand on his brow, and cursed the destiny that had flung the shame of a dismembered empire upon him.
Flung out with such force as to be smashed against the near end of the cage, Michael fell to the floor, tried to spring up, but crumpled and sank down, his right shoulder streaming blood from a terrible mauling and crushing.
And as soon as her brother had reached her, with a gesture that struck Vronsky by its decision and its grace, she flung her left arm around his neck, drew him rapidly to her, and kissed him warmly.
And behold, they flung the pallet directly upon Gringoire, beside whom they had arrived, without espying him.
She carried in her hands a thin handkerchief, which she tore into ribbons, rolled into a ball, and flung from her.
And at the same instant Dantes felt himself flung into the air like a wounded bird, falling, falling, with a rapidity that made his blood curdle.