fluorine


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fluor·ine

 (flo͝or′ēn′, -ĭn, flôr′-)
n. Symbol F
A pale-yellow, highly corrosive, poisonous, gaseous halogen element, the most electronegative and most reactive of all the elements, existing as a diatomic gas (F2) and used in a wide variety of industrially important compounds. Atomic number 9; atomic weight 18.9984; melting point -219.67°C; boiling point -188.12°C; specific gravity of liquid 1.50 (at boiling point); valence 1. See Periodic Table.

fluorine

(ˈflʊəriːn) or

fluorin

n
(Elements & Compounds) a toxic pungent pale yellow gas of the halogen group that is the most electronegative and reactive of all the elements, occurring principally in fluorspar and cryolite: used in the production of uranium, fluorocarbons, and other chemicals. Symbol: F; atomic no: 9; atomic wt: 18.9984032; valency: 1; density: 1.696 kg/m3; relative density: 1.108; freezing pt: –219.62°C; boiling pt: –188.13°C

fluor•ine

(ˈflʊər in, -ɪn, ˈflɔr-, ˈfloʊr-)

n.
the most reactive nonmetallic element, a pale yellow, corrosive, toxic gas that occurs combined, esp. in fluorite. Symbol: F; at. wt.: 18.9984; at. no.: 9.
[1813; < French]

fluor·ine

(flo͝or′ēn′)
Symbol F A pale-yellow, poisonous, gaseous halogen element that is highly corrosive. It is used to separate certain isotopes of uranium and to make refrigerants and high-temperature plastics. It is also added in fluoride form to the water supply to prevent tooth decay. Atomic number 9. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fluorine - a nonmetallic univalent element belonging to the halogensfluorine - a nonmetallic univalent element belonging to the halogens; usually a yellow irritating toxic flammable gas; a powerful oxidizing agent; recovered from fluorite or cryolite or fluorapatite
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
cryolite, Greenland spar - a white mineral consisting of fluorides of aluminum and sodium; a source of fluorine
fluorapatite - a form of apatite in which fluorine predominates over chlorine
fluor, fluorite, fluorspar - a soft mineral (calcium fluoride) that is fluorescent in ultraviolet light; chief source of fluorine
gas - a fluid in the gaseous state having neither independent shape nor volume and being able to expand indefinitely
halogen - any of five related nonmetallic elements (fluorine or chlorine or bromine or iodine or astatine) that are all monovalent and readily form negative ions
Translations
fluoor
غاز الفلورفلور
флуор
fluor
fluorfluór
fluor
fluoro
fluor
فلوئور
fluori
फ्लोरिन
fluor
fluor
fluor
flúor
フッ素
불소플루오린
fluor
fluoras
fluors
ഫ്ലൂറിന്‍
fluor
fluór
fluor
fluorфлуор
fluor
florini
ฟลูออรีน
florflüor
фтор
flo

fluorine

[ˈflʊəriːn] Nflúor m

fluorine

[ˈflʊəriːn] nfluor m

fluorine

nFluor nt

fluorine

[ˈflʊəriːn] nfluoro

fluoride

(ˈfluəraid) noun
any of several substances containing fluorine, especially one which helps to prevent tooth decay.
fluorine (ˈfluəriːn) noun
an element, a pale greenish-yellow gas.

fluor·ine

n. flúor, elemento químico gaseoso.

fluorine

n flúor m
References in periodicals archive ?
1932) found that a compound, platinum fluoride, was almost as active as fluorine itself and easier to work with.
This hydrolysis process produces a more toxic EHS, hydrogen fluoride, from an EHS, fluorine.
Throughout the early part of the 20th century, fluorine compounds were products of industrial processes, such as manufacture of aluminum and other metals, superphosphate fertilizers and ceramics.
The company is applying its expertise in fluorine chemistry, including breakthrough technology developed at Harvard University, to create Fluoropeutics[TM] - a proprietary portfolio of novel and differentiated small molecule drugs with improved pharmacological profiles based on approved medicines or clinical stage compounds targeting a range of therapeutic indications.
By simply upgrading to Fluorine, customers gain access to a new set of features that help them transition to a service delivery infrastructure, said SolidFires Field CTO Val Bercovici.
Ali Sadeqi, one of the Iranian researchers, explained that halogen bonds are very weak in fluorine and they do not usually occur.
They also have considerable experience in fluorination chemistry, successfully synthesising multiple (poly)fluorinated target molecules utilising a range of methods of fluorine introduction and exploiting the altered chemical reactivity of the substrates in the downstream chemistry.
International Isotopes Fluorine Products, a subsidiary of International Isotopes, Inc.
The scientists are still investigating exactly how this fluorine enters the human body.
The FKMs varied in monomer and fluorine content (64% F to 70% F).
So now we're not imaging the protons or water in your body [as MRI customarily does], we're imaging the fluorine that's in this nanoparticle.