flurry


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

flur·ry

 (flûr′ē, flŭr′ē)
n. pl. flur·ries
1. A brief, light snowfall.
2.
a. A sudden gust of wind.
b. A stirring mass, as of leaves or dust; a shower.
3. A sudden burst or commotion; a stir: a flurry of interest in the new product; a flurry of activity when the plane landed.
4. A short period of active trading, as on a stock exchange.
v. flur·ried, flur·ry·ing, flur·ries
v.tr.
To agitate, stir, or confuse.
v.intr.
To move or come down in a flurry.

[Perhaps from flurr, to scatter.]

flurry

(ˈflʌrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. a sudden commotion or burst of activity
2. a light gust of wind or rain or fall of snow
3. (Stock Exchange) stock exchange a sudden brief increase in trading or fluctuation in stock prices
4. (Fishing) the death spasms of a harpooned whale
vb, -ries, -rying or -ried
to confuse or bewilder or be confused or bewildered
[C17: from obsolete flurr to scatter, perhaps formed on analogy with hurry]

flur•ry

(ˈflɜr i, ˈflʌr i)

n., pl. -ries, n.
1. a light, brief shower of snow.
2. sudden commotion, excitement, confusion, or nervous hurry: a flurry of activity before the party.
3. a brief rise or fall in prices or a brief period of heavy trading on the stock exchange.
4. a sudden gust of wind.
v.t.
5. to make confused or agitated; fluster.
v.i.
6. (of snow) to fall or be blown in a flurry.
7. to move in an excited or agitated manner.
[1680–90; b. flutter and hurry]

Flurry

 a fluttering assembly of things.
Examples: flurry of birds [fluttering around before settling down on a lake or marsh]; of passions, 1710; of petals, 1884; of rain, 1892; of ruffles, 1882; of snow, 1836; of snowbirds, 1868; of snowflakes, 1883; of tempest, 1880; of wind.

flurry


Past participle: flurried
Gerund: flurrying

Imperative
flurry
flurry
Present
I flurry
you flurry
he/she/it flurries
we flurry
you flurry
they flurry
Preterite
I flurried
you flurried
he/she/it flurried
we flurried
you flurried
they flurried
Present Continuous
I am flurrying
you are flurrying
he/she/it is flurrying
we are flurrying
you are flurrying
they are flurrying
Present Perfect
I have flurried
you have flurried
he/she/it has flurried
we have flurried
you have flurried
they have flurried
Past Continuous
I was flurrying
you were flurrying
he/she/it was flurrying
we were flurrying
you were flurrying
they were flurrying
Past Perfect
I had flurried
you had flurried
he/she/it had flurried
we had flurried
you had flurried
they had flurried
Future
I will flurry
you will flurry
he/she/it will flurry
we will flurry
you will flurry
they will flurry
Future Perfect
I will have flurried
you will have flurried
he/she/it will have flurried
we will have flurried
you will have flurried
they will have flurried
Future Continuous
I will be flurrying
you will be flurrying
he/she/it will be flurrying
we will be flurrying
you will be flurrying
they will be flurrying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been flurrying
you have been flurrying
he/she/it has been flurrying
we have been flurrying
you have been flurrying
they have been flurrying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been flurrying
you will have been flurrying
he/she/it will have been flurrying
we will have been flurrying
you will have been flurrying
they will have been flurrying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been flurrying
you had been flurrying
he/she/it had been flurrying
we had been flurrying
you had been flurrying
they had been flurrying
Conditional
I would flurry
you would flurry
he/she/it would flurry
we would flurry
you would flurry
they would flurry
Past Conditional
I would have flurried
you would have flurried
he/she/it would have flurried
we would have flurried
you would have flurried
they would have flurried
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flurry - a rapid active commotionflurry - a rapid active commotion    
ruckus, ruction, rumpus, commotion, din, tumult - the act of making a noisy disturbance
2.flurry - a light brief snowfall and gust of wind (or something resembling that)flurry - a light brief snowfall and gust of wind (or something resembling that); "he had to close the window against the flurries"; "there was a flurry of chicken feathers"
snow, snowfall - precipitation falling from clouds in the form of ice crystals
Verb1.flurry - move in an agitated or confused manner
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
2.flurry - cause to feel embarrassment; "The constant attention of the young man confused her"
befuddle, confound, confuse, discombobulate, fox, bedevil, fuddle, throw - be confusing or perplexing to; cause to be unable to think clearly; "These questions confuse even the experts"; "This question completely threw me"; "This question befuddled even the teacher"
fluster - cause to be nervous or upset
bother - make confused or perplexed or puzzled
distract, deflect - draw someone's attention away from something; "The thief distracted the bystanders"; "He deflected his competitors"
abash, embarrass - cause to be embarrassed; cause to feel self-conscious

flurry

noun
2. burst, spell, bout, outbreak, spurt a flurry of diplomatic activity
3. gust, shower, gale, swirl, squall, storm A flurry of snowflakes was scudding by the window.

flurry

noun
Agitated, excited movement and activity:
verb
To impair or destroy the composure of:
Informal: rattle.
Translations
إهْتِياج، إضْطِرابهَبَّة ريح فُجائِيَّه
poryvrozčilenírozrušenízávan
hektisk aktivitetsnebygeurovindkast
hózápor
hviîauppnám
lengvas sniegelis
brazmanemierssatraukumssniegelis
kar serpintisisağanakşaşkınlık

flurry

[ˈflʌrɪ] N [of wind, snow] → racha f, ráfaga f; [of rain] → chaparrón m (fig) [of excitement] → frenesí m
to be in a flurryestar nervioso
a flurry of activityun frenesí de actividad

flurry

[ˈflʌri] n
[snow] → rafale f
a flurry of activity → un débordement d'activité
a flurry of excitement → un frisson d'agitation

flurry

n
(of snow)Gestöber nt; (of rain)Guss m; (of wind)Stoß m; a flurry of blowsein Hagel mvon Schlägen
(fig)Aufregung f, → Nervosität f; in a flurryganz aufgescheucht, in großer Aufregung; a flurry of activityeine Hektik; a flurry of excitementhektische Aufregung

flurry

[ˈflʌrɪ] n (of snow) → turbine m; (of wind) → folata
a flurry of activity/excitement → una grande attività/un'improvvisa agitazione
in a flurry → in uno stato di agitazione or eccitazione

flurry

(ˈflari) , ((American) ˈflə:ri) plural ˈflurries noun
1. a sudden rush (of wind etc); light snow. A flurry of wind made the door bang; a flurry of excitement; The children expected a lot of snow but there were only flurries.
2. a confusion. She was in a flurry.
References in classic literature ?
At the Kings' today I found everybody in a flurry, and one of the children said that her oldest brother had done something dreadful, and Papa had sent him away.
Grose; the rigor with which I kept my pupils in sight making it often difficult to meet her privately, and the more as we each felt the importance of not provoking--on the part of the servants quite as much as on that of the children--any suspicion of a secret flurry or that of a discussion of mysteries.
And now it is struck; for, starting from his trance into that unspeakable thing called his flurry, the monster horribly wallowed in his blood, over-wrapped himself in impenetrable, mad, boiling spray, so that the imperilled craft, instantly dropping astern, had much ado blindly to struggle out from that phrensied twilight into the clear air of the day.
You may hurry and scurry, And flurry and worry, You've lost them forever, Forever and aye.
Presently the Savior's name was mentioned, and in her flurry she lost her head completely, and rose and courtesied, instead of making a slight nod as everybody else did.
You may guess, dear Miss Woodhouse, what a flurry it has thrown me in
As the elms bent to one another, like giants who were whispering secrets, and after a few seconds of such repose, fell into a violent flurry, tossing their wild arms about, as if their late confidences were really too wicked for their peace of mind, some weatherbeaten ragged old rooks'-nests, burdening their higher branches, swung like wrecks upon a stormy sea.
We therefore trusted ourselves to the mercy of the waves, and in about half an hour the boat was overset by a sudden flurry from the north.
cried Alice, quite forgetting in the flurry of the moment how large she had grown in the last few minutes, and she jumped up in such a hurry that she tipped over the jury-box with the edge of her skirt, upsetting all the jurymen on to the heads of the crowd below, and there they lay sprawling about, reminding her very much of a globe of goldfish she had accidentally upset the week before.
It is true that the innkeeper detained his alforjas in payment of what was owing to him, but Sancho took his departure in such a flurry that he never missed them.
My attention was diverted from this death flurry by a furious yelling, like that of the thing called a siren in our manufacturing towns.
He had seen a good deal of flurry and haste in her movement as she changed her attitude.