flutter


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Related to flutter: atrial flutter, flutter device

flut·ter

 (flŭt′ər)
v. flut·tered, flut·ter·ing, flut·ters
v.intr.
1. To wave or flap rapidly in an irregular manner: curtains that fluttered in the breeze.
2.
a. To fly by a quick light flapping of the wings.
b. To flap the wings without flying.
3. To move or fall in a manner suggestive of tremulous flight: "Her arms rose, fell, and fluttered with the rhythm of the song" (Evelyn Waugh).
4. To vibrate or beat rapidly or erratically: My heart fluttered wildly.
5. To move quickly in a nervous, restless, or excited fashion; flit.
v.tr.
To cause to flutter: "fluttering her bristly black lashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings" (Margaret Mitchell).
n.
1. The act of fluttering.
2. A condition of nervous excitement or agitation: Everyone was in a flutter over the news that the director was resigning.
3. A commotion; a stir.
4. Medicine Abnormally rapid pulsation, especially of the atria or ventricles of the heart.
5. Rapid fluctuation in the pitch of a sound reproduction resulting from variations in the speed of the recording or reproducing equipment.
6. Chiefly British A small bet; a gamble: "If they like a flutter, Rick will get them better odds than the bookies" (John le Carré).

[Middle English floteren, from Old English floterian; see pleu- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

flut′ter·er n.
flut′ter·y adj.

flutter

(ˈflʌtə)
vb
1. to wave or cause to wave rapidly; flap
2. (Zoology) (intr) (of birds, butterflies, etc) to flap the wings
3. (intr) to move, esp downwards, with an irregular motion
4. (Pathology) (intr) pathol (of the auricles of the heart) to beat abnormally rapidly, esp in a regular rhythm
5. to be or make nervous or restless
6. (intr) to move about restlessly
7. (Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) swimming to cause (the legs) to move up and down in a flutter kick or (of the legs) to move in this way
8. (tr) informal Brit to wager or gamble (a small amount of money)
n
9. a quick flapping or vibrating motion
10. a state of nervous excitement or confusion
11. excited interest; sensation; stir
12. informal Brit a modest bet or wager
13. (Pathology) pathol an abnormally rapid beating of the auricles of the heart (200 to 400 beats per minute), esp in a regular rhythm, sometimes resulting in heart block
14. (Electronics) electronics a slow variation in pitch in a sound-reproducing system, similar to wow but occurring at higher frequencies
15. (Aeronautics) a potentially dangerous oscillation of an aircraft, or part of an aircraft, caused by the interaction of aerodynamic forces, structural elastic reactions, and inertia
16. (Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) swimming See flutter kick
17. (Music, other) music Also called: flutter tonguing a method of sounding a wind instrument, esp the flute, with a rolling movement of the tongue
[Old English floterian to float to and fro; related to German flattern; see float]
ˈflutterer n
ˈflutteringly adv

flut•ter

(ˈflʌt ər)

v.i.
1. to wave or flap about: Banners fluttered in the breeze.
2. to flap the wings rapidly or fly with flapping movements.
3. to move in quick, irregular motions; vibrate.
4. to beat rapidly, as the heart.
5. to be tremulous or agitated.
6. to go with irregular motions or aimless course.
v.t.
7. to cause to flutter.
8. to throw into nervous or tremulous excitement or agitation.
n.
9. a fluttering movement.
10. a state of nervous excitement or mental agitation: a flutter of anticipation.
11. a stir; flurry.
12. a variation in pitch resulting from rapid fluctuations in the speed of a sound recording. Compare wow 2.
13. Chiefly Brit. a small wager or speculative investment.
[before 1000; Middle English floteren, Old English floterian, frequentative of flotian to float]
flut′ter•er, n.
flut′ter•ing•ly, adv.
flut′ter•y, adj.

Flutter

 of cardiologists—Mensa.

flutter


Past participle: fluttered
Gerund: fluttering

Imperative
flutter
flutter
Present
I flutter
you flutter
he/she/it flutters
we flutter
you flutter
they flutter
Preterite
I fluttered
you fluttered
he/she/it fluttered
we fluttered
you fluttered
they fluttered
Present Continuous
I am fluttering
you are fluttering
he/she/it is fluttering
we are fluttering
you are fluttering
they are fluttering
Present Perfect
I have fluttered
you have fluttered
he/she/it has fluttered
we have fluttered
you have fluttered
they have fluttered
Past Continuous
I was fluttering
you were fluttering
he/she/it was fluttering
we were fluttering
you were fluttering
they were fluttering
Past Perfect
I had fluttered
you had fluttered
he/she/it had fluttered
we had fluttered
you had fluttered
they had fluttered
Future
I will flutter
you will flutter
he/she/it will flutter
we will flutter
you will flutter
they will flutter
Future Perfect
I will have fluttered
you will have fluttered
he/she/it will have fluttered
we will have fluttered
you will have fluttered
they will have fluttered
Future Continuous
I will be fluttering
you will be fluttering
he/she/it will be fluttering
we will be fluttering
you will be fluttering
they will be fluttering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been fluttering
you have been fluttering
he/she/it has been fluttering
we have been fluttering
you have been fluttering
they have been fluttering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been fluttering
you will have been fluttering
he/she/it will have been fluttering
we will have been fluttering
you will have been fluttering
they will have been fluttering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been fluttering
you had been fluttering
he/she/it had been fluttering
we had been fluttering
you had been fluttering
they had been fluttering
Conditional
I would flutter
you would flutter
he/she/it would flutter
we would flutter
you would flutter
they would flutter
Past Conditional
I would have fluttered
you would have fluttered
he/she/it would have fluttered
we would have fluttered
you would have fluttered
they would have fluttered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flutter - the act of moving back and forthflutter - the act of moving back and forth  
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
2.flutter - abnormally rapid beating of the auricles of the heart (especially in a regular rhythm); can result in heart block
arrhythmia, cardiac arrhythmia - an abnormal rate of muscle contractions in the heart
3.flutter - a disorderly outburst or tumult; "they were amazed by the furious disturbance they had caused"
disorder - a disturbance of the peace or of public order
turmoil, upheaval, convulsion - a violent disturbance; "the convulsions of the stock market"
earthquake - a disturbance that is extremely disruptive; "selling the company caused an earthquake among the employees"
incident - a public disturbance; "the police investigated an incident at the bus station"
stir, splash - a prominent or sensational but short-lived news event; "he made a great splash and then disappeared"
tempest, storm - a violent commotion or disturbance; "the storms that had characterized their relationship had died away"; "it was only a tempest in a teapot"
storm center, storm centre - a center of trouble or disturbance
garboil, tumult, tumultuousness, uproar - a state of commotion and noise and confusion
4.flutter - the motion made by flapping up and downflutter - the motion made by flapping up and down
undulation, wave - (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth
Verb1.flutter - move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart; "The hummingbird flitted among the branches"
butterfly - flutter like a butterfly
hurry, travel rapidly, zip, speed - move very fast; "The runner zipped past us at breakneck speed"
2.flutter - move back and forth very rapidly; "the candle flickered"
move back and forth - move in one direction and then into the opposite direction
3.flutter - flap the wings rapidly or fly with flapping movements; "The seagulls fluttered overhead"
flap, beat - move with a thrashing motion; "The bird flapped its wings"; "The eagle beat its wings and soared high into the sky"
4.flutter - beat rapidly; "His heart palpitated"
thump, beat, pound - move rhythmically; "Her heart was beating fast"
palpitate - cause to throb or beat rapidly; "Her violent feelings palpitated the young woman's heart"
5.flutter - wink briefly; "bat one's eyelids"
blink, nictate, nictitate, wink - briefly shut the eyes; "The TV announcer never seems to blink"

flutter

verb
1. beat, bat, flap, tremble, shiver, flicker, ripple, waver, fluctuate, agitate, ruffle, quiver, vibrate, palpitate a butterfly fluttering its wings
2. flit, hover, flitter The birds were fluttering among the trees.
3. flap, fly, wave, shake, swish It was silent except for the flags fluttering in the background.
noun
1. bet, gamble, punt (chiefly Brit.), wager I had a flutter on five horses.
2. tremor, tremble, shiver, shudder, palpitation She felt a flutter of trepidation in her stomach.
3. vibration, flapping, twitching, quiver, quivering loud twittering and a desperate flutter of wings
4. agitation, state (informal), confusion, excitement, flap (informal), tremble, flurry, dither (chiefly Brit.), commotion, fluster, tumult, perturbation, state of nervous excitement She was in a flutter.

flutter

verb
1. To move or cause to move about while being fixed at one edge:
2. To move through the air with or as if with wings:
3. To move quickly, lightly, and irregularly like a bird in flight:
4. To move (one's arms or wings, for example) up and down:
noun
A state of discomposure:
Informal: lather, stew.
Translations
اهْتِياج عَصَبيخَفَقان، رَفْرَفَهيَخْفِق، يُرَفْرِفيُرفْرِف بِجَناحَيْه، يَخْفِق
chvěnínervozitapoletovatsnést setřepetat křídly
bankenflagreskælvenuro
kiihtymyslepattaalepatusräpytellävärinä
csapkodkalimpálás
feykjast; flöktaflögraóróleiki, spenna, uppnámtitringur
plazdesysplazdėtipleventispurdesysvirpulys
dauzītieslaidelētieslidinātiesneregulāri sistplivināt
trep ať krídlamizniesť sa
fladdraflaxa
çarpıntıçırpınmakkanatlarını çırpmaktelâşuçuşmak

flutter

[ˈflʌtəʳ]
A. N
1. (= movement) [of wings] → aleteo m; [of eyelashes] → pestañeo m
2. (= tremor) to be in a flutter (fig) → estar nervioso
to cause a fluttercausar revuelo
to feel a flutter of excitementestremecerse de la emoción
there was a flutter of fear in her voicela voz le temblaba por el miedo
3. (= bet) to have a flutterechar una apuesta
to have a flutter on a raceapostar a un caballo
B. VT [+ wings] → batir
the sparrow was fluttering its wingsel gorrión batía las alas, el gorrión aleteaba
to flutter one's eyelashes at sbhacer ojitos a algn
C. VI [bird] → revolotear; [butterfly] → mover las alas; [flag] → ondear; [heart] → palpitar
a leaf came fluttering downuna hoja cayó balanceándose
the bird fluttered about the roomel pájaro revoloteaba por la habitación
a butterfly fluttered awayuna mariposa pasó revoloteando

flutter

[ˈflʌtər]
n
(= slight movement) [eyelids] → battement m; [pulse] → palpitation f
(= spasm) [emotion] → mouvement m
[wings] → battement m
[clothes, cloth] → flottement m
(= bet) → pari m
to have a flutter (= lay a bet) → parier (aux courses)
vi
[bird] → battre des ailes
(= flap) [clothes, flag] → flotter
The paper fluttered to the floor → Le papier est tombé par terre en tourbillonnant.
[heart] → palpiter
vt
[+ wings] → battre
[+ eyelashes] → battre

flutter

vi
(flag, bird, butterfly)flattern (also Med); her heart fluttered as he entered the roomsie bekam Herzklopfen, als er das Zimmer betrat; to flutter away or offdavonflattern
(person)tänzeln; (nervously) → flatterig sein; to flutter aroundherumtänzeln, nervös herumfuhrwerken (inf); she fluttered into/out of the roomsie tänzelte ins Zimmer/aus dem Zimmer
vt fan, piece of paperwedeln mit; (birds) wingsflattern mit; one’s eyelashesklimpern mit (hum inf); to flutter one’s eyelashes at somebodymit den Wimpern klimpern (hum), → jdn mit einem tollen Augenaufschlag bezirzen
n
Flattern nt (also Med); this caused a flutter among the audiencedies verursachte leichte Unruhe im Publikum
(= nervousness) (all) in or of a flutterin heller Aufregung; flutter of anxiety/excitementbesorgte/aufgeregte Unruhe
(Brit inf) to have a flutter (= gamble)sein Glück (beim Wetten) versuchen; he likes his little flutter on a Friday nighter versucht freitagabends gern sein Glück beim Wetten
(Aviat) → Flattern nt

flutter

[ˈflʌtəʳ]
1. nagitazione f; (of eyelashes) → battito; (of wings) → battito, frullio
to be in a flutter (fig) → essere in uno stato di agitazione
to have a flutter (fam) (gamble) → fare una scommessa
2. vt (wings) → battere
to flutter one's eyelashes at sb → fare gli occhi dolci a qn
3. visvolazzare; (bird) → battere le ali; (flag) → sventolare; (heart) → palpitare

flutter

(ˈflatə) verb
1. to (cause to) move quickly. A leaf fluttered to the ground.
2. (of a bird, insect etc) to move the wings rapidly and lightly. The moth fluttered round the light.
noun
1. a quick irregular movement (of a pulse etc). She felt a flutter in her chest.
2. nervous excitement. She was in a great flutter.

flut·ter

n. aleteo, acción similar al movimiento de las alas de los pájaros;
atrial ______ auricular;
___ and fibrillationfibrilación y ___;
ventricular ______ ventricular;
v. aletear, sacudir; agitarse.

flutter

n aleteo; atrial — aleteo auricular
References in classic literature ?
Laurie was in a flutter of excitement at the idea of having company, and flew about to get ready, for as Mrs.
The chicken, hereupon, though almost as venerable in appearance as its, mother--possessing, indeed, the whole antiquity of its progenitors in miniature,--mustered vivacity enough to flutter upward and alight on Phoebe's shoulder.
Teta Elzbieta is all in a flutter, like a hummingbird; her sisters, too, keep running up behind her, whispering, breathless.
She wondered within herself at the strength that seemed to be come upon her; for she felt the weight of her boy as if it had been a feather, and every flutter of fear seemed to increase the supernatural power that bore her on, while from her pale lips burst forth, in frequent ejaculations, the prayer to a Friend above--"Lord, help
We skipped out and looked; but it warn't nothing but the flutter of a steamboat's wheel away down, coming around the point; so we come back.
Huldah's school- girl romances, with their wealth of commonplace detail, were not the stuff her dreams were made of, when dreams did flutter across the sensitive plate of her mind.
They remained but a few minutes together, as Miss Woodhouse must not be kept waiting; and Harriet then came running to her with a smiling face, and in a flutter of spirits, which Miss Woodhouse hoped very soon to compose.
Her spirits still continued very high; but there was a flutter in them which prevented their giving much pleasure to her sister, and this agitation increased as the evening drew on.
He did not even flutter his wings; he sat without stirring, and looked at Mary.
There was no mistaking the sudden flutter and agitation in his manner, and the heightened color in his wizen little face.
They were consigned to me, with him, at the--" He dropped his voice, there was a flutter among the military lanterns, and one of them being handed into the coach by an arm in uniform, the eyes connected with the arm looked, not an every day or an every night look, at monsieur with the white head.
These orders I obeyed, in such a flutter and hurry of my young spirits as I had never known before; and when I got to the parlour door, and the thought came into my head that it might be my mother - I had only thought of Mr.