flux


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Related to flux: Electric flux, magnetic flux

flux

 (flŭks)
n.
1.
a. A flow or flowing of a liquid.
b. The flowing in of the tide.
c. A continuing movement, especially in large numbers of things: a flux of sensation.
2. Constant or frequent change; fluctuation: "The constant flux of people and groups ensures that human gene pools will always be mixed" (Steve Olson).
3. Medicine The discharge of large quantities of fluid material from the body, especially the discharge of watery feces from the intestines.
4. Physics
a. The rate of flow of fluid, particles, or energy through a given surface.
c. The lines of force of an electric or magnetic field.
5. Chemistry & Metallurgy A substance that aids, induces, or otherwise actively participates in fusing or flowing, as:
a. A substance applied to a surface to be joined by welding, soldering, or brazing to facilitate the flowing of solder and prevent formation of oxides.
b. A mineral added to the metals in a furnace to promote fusing or to prevent the formation of oxides.
c. An additive that improves the flow of plastics during fabrication.
d. A readily fusible glass or enamel used as a base in ceramic work.
v. fluxed, flux·ing, flux·es
v.tr.
1. To melt; fuse.
2. To apply a flux to.
v.intr.
1. To become fluid.
2. To flow; stream.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin flūxus, from past participle of fluere, to flow; see bhleu- in Indo-European roots.]

flux

(flʌks)
n
1. a flow or discharge
2. continuous change; instability
3. (Metallurgy) a substance, such as borax or salt, that gives a low melting-point mixture with a metal oxide. It is used for cleaning metal surfaces during soldering, etc, and for protecting the surfaces of liquid metals
4. (Metallurgy) metallurgy a chemical used to increase the fluidity of refining slags in order to promote the rate of chemical reaction
5. (Ceramics) a similar substance used in the making of glass
6. (General Physics) physics
a. the rate of flow of particles, energy, or a fluid, through a specified area, such as that of neutrons (neutron flux) or of light energy (luminous flux)
b. the strength of a field in a given area expressed as the product of the area and the component of the field strength at right angles to the area: magnetic flux; electric flux.
7. (Pathology) pathol an excessive discharge of fluid from the body, such as watery faeces in diarrhoea
8. the act or process of melting; fusion
9. (Philosophy) (in the philosophy of Heraclitus) the state of constant change in which all things exist
vb
10. to make or become fluid
11. (Metallurgy) (tr) to apply flux to (a metal, soldered joint, etc)
12. (tr) an obsolete word for purge
[C14: from Latin fluxus a flow, from fluere to flow]

flux

(flʌks)

n.
1. a flowing or flow.
2. the flowing in of the tide.
3. continuous change or movement: Our plans are in a state of flux.
4.
a. the rate of flow of fluid, particles, or energy.
b. a quantity expressing the strength of a field of force in a given area.
5.
a. a substance used to refine metals by combining with impurities to form a molten mixture that can be readily removed.
b. a substance used to prevent oxidation of fused metal, as in soldering.
6. an abnormal discharge of liquid matter from the bowels.
v.t.
7. to melt; make fluid.
8. to fuse by the use of flux.
v.i.
9. to flow.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin fluxus flow, discharge, variant of fluctus; see fluctuate]

flux

(flŭks)
1. A substance used in a smelting furnace to make metals melt more easily.
2. The rate of flow of fluids, particles, or energy across a given surface or area. See magnetic flux.

flux


Past participle: fluxed
Gerund: fluxing

Imperative
flux
flux
Present
I flux
you flux
he/she/it fluxes
we flux
you flux
they flux
Preterite
I fluxed
you fluxed
he/she/it fluxed
we fluxed
you fluxed
they fluxed
Present Continuous
I am fluxing
you are fluxing
he/she/it is fluxing
we are fluxing
you are fluxing
they are fluxing
Present Perfect
I have fluxed
you have fluxed
he/she/it has fluxed
we have fluxed
you have fluxed
they have fluxed
Past Continuous
I was fluxing
you were fluxing
he/she/it was fluxing
we were fluxing
you were fluxing
they were fluxing
Past Perfect
I had fluxed
you had fluxed
he/she/it had fluxed
we had fluxed
you had fluxed
they had fluxed
Future
I will flux
you will flux
he/she/it will flux
we will flux
you will flux
they will flux
Future Perfect
I will have fluxed
you will have fluxed
he/she/it will have fluxed
we will have fluxed
you will have fluxed
they will have fluxed
Future Continuous
I will be fluxing
you will be fluxing
he/she/it will be fluxing
we will be fluxing
you will be fluxing
they will be fluxing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been fluxing
you have been fluxing
he/she/it has been fluxing
we have been fluxing
you have been fluxing
they have been fluxing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been fluxing
you will have been fluxing
he/she/it will have been fluxing
we will have been fluxing
you will have been fluxing
they will have been fluxing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been fluxing
you had been fluxing
he/she/it had been fluxing
we had been fluxing
you had been fluxing
they had been fluxing
Conditional
I would flux
you would flux
he/she/it would flux
we would flux
you would flux
they would flux
Past Conditional
I would have fluxed
you would have fluxed
he/she/it would have fluxed
we would have fluxed
you would have fluxed
they would have fluxed

flux

A flow of particles, a fluid, or an electric or magnetic field.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flux - the rate of flow of energy or particles across a given surface
rate - a magnitude or frequency relative to a time unit; "they traveled at a rate of 55 miles per hour"; "the rate of change was faster than expected"
neutron flux - the rate of flow of neutrons; the number of neutrons passing through a unit area in unit time
radiant flux - the rate of flow of radiant energy (electromagnetic waves)
2.flux - a flow or discharge
flow, flowing - the motion characteristic of fluids (liquids or gases)
3.flux - a substance added to molten metals to bond with impurities that can then be readily removed
chemical, chemical substance - material produced by or used in a reaction involving changes in atoms or molecules
soldering flux - flux applied to surfaces that are to be joined by soldering; flux cleans the surfaces and results in a better bond
4.flux - excessive discharge of liquid from a cavity or organ (as in watery diarrhea)
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
5.flux - a state of uncertainty about what should be done (usually following some important event) preceding the establishment of a new direction of action; "the flux following the death of the emperor"
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
6.flux - the lines of force surrounding a permanent magnet or a moving charged particleflux - the lines of force surrounding a permanent magnet or a moving charged particle
field of force, force field, field - the space around a radiating body within which its electromagnetic oscillations can exert force on another similar body not in contact with it
magnetosphere - the magnetic field of a planet; the volume around the planet in which charged particles are subject more to the planet's magnetic field than to the solar magnetic field
solar magnetic field - the magnetic field of the sun
7.flux - (physics) the number of changes in energy flow across a given surface per unit area
density, denseness - the amount per unit size
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
8.flux - in constant change; "his opinions are in flux"; "the newness and flux of the computer industry"
change - the action of changing something; "the change of government had no impact on the economy"; "his change on abortion cost him the election"
Verb1.flux - move or progress freely as if in a stream; "The crowd flowed out of the stadium"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
cockle, ripple, ruffle, undulate, riffle - stir up (water) so as to form ripples
transpirate, transpire - pass through the tissue or substance or its pores or interstices, as of gas
2.flux - become liquid or fluid when heated; "the frozen fat liquefied"
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
change integrity - change in physical make-up
condense, distil, distill - undergo condensation; change from a gaseous to a liquid state and fall in drops; "water condenses"; "The acid distills at a specific temperature"
dethaw, thaw, unfreeze, unthaw, melt, dissolve - become or cause to become soft or liquid; "The sun melted the ice"; "the ice thawed"; "the ice cream melted"; "The heat melted the wax"; "The giant iceberg dissolved over the years during the global warming phase"; "dethaw the meat"
fuse - become plastic or fluid or liquefied from heat; "The substances fused at a very high temperature"
3.flux - mix together different elementsflux - mix together different elements; "The colors blend well"
change integrity - change in physical make-up
gauge - mix in specific proportions; "gauge plaster"
absorb - cause to become one with; "The sales tax is absorbed into the state income tax"
meld, melt - lose its distinct outline or shape; blend gradually; "Hundreds of actors were melting into the scene"
mix in, blend in - cause (something) to be mixed with (something else); "At this stage of making the cake, blend in the nuts"
accrete - grow together (of plants and organs); "After many years the rose bushes grew together"
conjugate - unite chemically so that the product is easily broken down into the original compounds
admix - mix or blend; "Hyaline casts were admixed with neutrophils"
alloy - make an alloy of
syncretise, syncretize - become fused

flux

noun
2. flow, movement, motion, fluidity the flux of cosmic rays

flux

noun
Something suggestive of running water:
verb
To change from a solid to a liquid:
Translations
تَدَفُّق، جَرَيان، سَيْل
neustálá změna
állandó változás
óvissa, ótryggt ástand
nuolatinė kaita
nepārtraukta mainība
stála zmena
sürekli değişim

flux

[flʌks] N to be in a state of fluxestar inestable, estar cambiando continuamente

flux

[ˈflʌks] n
to be in a constant state of flux → fluctuer continuellement

flux

n
(= state of change)Fluss m; things are in a state of fluxdie Dinge sind im Fluss; to be in constant fluxständig im Fluss sein
(Med: no pl) → Ausfluss m; (Phys) → Fluss m
(Metal) → Flussmittel nt

flux

[flʌks] n
a. to be in a state of fluxessere in continuo mutamento
b. (Med, Phys) → flusso; (Metallurgy) → fondente m

flux

(flaks) noun
continual change. Events are in a state of flux.

flux

n. flujo excesivo proveniente de una cavidad u órgano del cuerpo.
References in classic literature ?
The language of this country being always upon the flux, the STRULDBRUGS of one age do not understand those of another; neither are they able, after two hundred years, to hold any conversation (farther than by a few general words) with their neighbours the mortals; and thus they lie under the disadvantage of living like foreigners in their own country.
This hurricane of human beings, the flux and reflux of living bodies, had the effect of leaving for a few short moments the whole bank of the Beresina deserted.
PEGAMOID- (1) Personally we prefer glass or flux compounds to any other material for winter work nose-caps as being absolutely non-hygroscopic.
All she gave me was a flux, and no sort of strength.
Certain it is, that the matter is in a perpetual flux, and never at a stay.
So do flux and reflux--the rhythm of change--alternate and persist in everything under the sky.
On the brink of departure she was always seized with a flux of words.
If I have described life as a flux of moods, I must now add that there is that in us which changes not and which ranks all sensations and states of mind.
A continual flux of a thousand black points which passed each other on the pavements made everything move before the eyes; it was the populace seen thus from aloft and afar.
If you had the scientific imagination, you would cast your mind forward from this one fact, and you would see some few millions of years hence--a mere passing moment in the enormous flux of the ages--the whole world teeming once more with the animal and human life which will spring from this tiny root.
Life is a mad dance in the domain of flux, wherein appearances in mighty tides ebb and flow, chained to the wheels of moons beyond our ken.
Never in the history of the world was society in so terrific flux as it is right now.