fly


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fly 1

 (flī)
v. flew (flo͞o), flown (flōn), fly·ing, flies (flīz)
v.intr.
1. To engage in flight, especially:
a. To move through the air by means of wings or winglike parts.
b. To travel by air: We flew to Dallas.
c. To operate an aircraft or spacecraft.
2.
a. To rise in or be carried through the air by the wind: a kite flying above the playground.
b. To float or flap in the air: pennants flying from the masthead.
3. To move or be sent through the air with great speed: bullets flying in every direction; a plate that flew from my hands when I stumbled.
4.
a. To move with great speed; rush or dart: The children flew down the hall.
b. To be communicated to many people: Rumors are flying about their breakup.
c. To flee; escape.
d. To hasten; spring: flew to her students' defense.
5. To pass by swiftly: a vacation flying by.
6. To be dissipated; vanish: All his money has flown.
7. past tense and past participle flied (flīd) Baseball To hit a fly ball.
8.
a. To shatter or explode: The dropped plate flew into pieces.
b. To become suddenly emotional, especially angry: The driver flew into a rage.
9. Informal To gain acceptance or approval; go over: "However sophisticated the reasoning, this particular notion may not fly" (New York Times).
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to fly or float in the air: fly a kite; fly a flag.
b. Nautical To operate under (a particular flag): a tanker that flies the Liberian flag.
2.
a. To pilot (an aircraft or spacecraft).
b. To carry or transport in an aircraft or spacecraft: fly emergency supplies to a stricken area.
c. To pass over or through in flight: flew the coastal route in record time.
d. To perform in a spacecraft or aircraft: flew six missions into space.
3.
a. To flee or run from: fly a place in panic.
b. To avoid; shun: fly temptation.
n. pl. flies
1. The act of flying; flight.
2.
a. The opening, or the fastening that closes this opening, on the front of a pair of pants.
b. The flap of cloth that covers this opening.
3. A piece of protective fabric secured over a tent and often extended over the entrance.
4. A flyleaf.
5. Baseball A fly ball.
6. Sports In swimming, butterfly.
7.
a. The span of a flag from the staff to the outer edge.
b. The outer edge of a flag.
8. A flywheel.
9. flies The area directly over the stage of a theater, containing overhead lights, drop curtains, and equipment for raising and lowering sets.
10. Chiefly British A one-horse carriage, especially one for hire.
Phrasal Verb:
fly at
To attack fiercely; assault: The dogs flew at each other's throats.
Idioms:
fly high
To be elated: They were flying high after their first child was born.
fly off the handle Informal
To become suddenly enraged: flew off the handle when the train was finally canceled.
let fly
1. To shoot, hurl, or release: The troops let fly a volley of gunfire.
2. To lash out; assault: The mayor let fly with an angry attack on her critics.
on the fly
1. In a hurry or between pressing activities: took lunch on the fly.
2. While moving: The outfielder caught the ball on the fly.
3. In the air; in flight: The ball carried 500 feet on the fly.
4. While activity is ongoing: A coach can change players on the fly in hockey. This computer program compiles on the fly when a script is executed.

[Middle English flien, from Old English flēogan; see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]

fly′a·ble adj.

fly 2

 (flī)
n. pl. flies
1.
a. Any of numerous two-winged insects of the order Diptera, especially any of the family Muscidae, which includes the housefly.
b. Any of various other flying insects, such as a caddisfly.
2. A fishing lure simulating a fly, made by attaching materials such as feathers, tinsel, and colored thread to a fishhook.
Idiom:
fly in the ointment
A detrimental circumstance or detail; a drawback.

[Middle English flie, from Old English flēoge; see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]

fly 3

 (flī)
adj.
1. Chiefly British Mentally alert; sharp.
2. Slang Fashionable; stylish.

[Probably from fly.]

fly

(flaɪ)
vb, flies, flying, flew or flown
1. (intr) (of birds, aircraft, etc) to move through the air in a controlled manner using aerodynamic forces
2. (Aeronautics) to travel over (an area of land or sea) in an aircraft
3. (Aeronautics) to operate (an aircraft or spacecraft)
4. to float, flutter, or be displayed in the air or cause to float, etc, in this way: to fly a kite; they flew the flag.
5. to transport or be transported by or through the air by aircraft, wind, etc
6. (intr) to move or be moved very quickly, forcibly, or suddenly: she came flying towards me; the door flew open.
7. (intr) to pass swiftly: time flies.
8. to escape from (an enemy, place, etc); flee: he flew the country.
9. (intr; may be foll by at or upon) to attack a person
10. (intr) to have a sudden outburst: he flew into a rage again.
11. (intr) (of money, etc) to vanish rapidly
12. (Falconry) (tr) falconry (of hawks) to fly at (quarry) in attack: peregrines fly rooks.
13. (Theatre) (tr) theatre to suspend (scenery) above the stage so that it may be lowered into view
14. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) fly a kite
a. to procure money by an accommodation bill
b. to release information or take a step in order to test public opinion
15. fly high informal
a. to have a high aim
b. to prosper or flourish
16. fly in the face of See face19
17. fly off the handle informal to lose one's temper
18. fly the coop informal US and Canadian to leave suddenly
19. go fly a kite informal US and Canadian go away
20. let fly informal
a. to lose one's temper (with a person): she really let fly at him.
b. to shoot or throw (an object)
n, pl flies
21. (Clothing & Fashion) (often plural) Also called: fly front a closure that conceals a zip, buttons, or other fastening, by having one side overlapping, as on trousers
22. (Other Non-sporting Hobbies)
a. a flap forming the entrance to a tent
b. a piece of canvas drawn over the ridgepole of a tent to form an outer roof
23. (Mechanical Engineering) a small air brake used to control the chiming of large clocks
24. (Mechanical Engineering) the horizontal weighted arm of a fly press
25. (Heraldry)
a. the outer edge of a flag
b. the distance from the outer edge of a flag to the staff. Compare hoist9
26. (Automotive Engineering) Brit a light one-horse covered carriage formerly let out on hire
27. Austral and NZ an attempt: I'll give it a fly.
28. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing
a. a device for transferring printed sheets from the press to a flat pile
b. Also called: flyhand a person who collects and stacks printed matter from a printing press
c. a piece of paper folded once to make four pages, with printing only on the first page
29. (Theatre) (plural) theatre the space above the stage out of view of the audience, used for storing scenery, etc
30. rare the act of flying
31. on the fly informal without coming to a stop
[Old English flēogan; related to Old Frisian fliāga, Old High German fliogan, Old Norse fljūga]
ˈflyable adj

fly

(flaɪ)
n, pl flies
1. (Animals) any dipterous insect, esp the housefly, characterized by active flight. See also horsefly, blowfly, tsetse fly, crane fly
2. (Animals) any of various similar but unrelated insects, such as the caddis fly, firefly, dragonfly, and chalcid fly
3. (Angling) angling a lure made from a fish-hook dressed with feathers, tinsel, etc, to resemble any of various flies or nymphs: used in fly-fishing. See also dry fly, wet fly
4. (Physical Geography) (in southern Africa) an area that is infested with the tsetse fly
5. drink with the flies slang Austral to drink alone
6. fly in amber See amber2
7. fly in the ointment informal a slight flaw that detracts from value, completeness, or enjoyment
8. fly on the wall a person who watches others, while not being noticed himself or herself
9. there are no flies on him informal he is no fool
[Old English flēoge; related to Old Norse fluga Old High German flioga; see fly1]
ˈflyless adj

fly

(flaɪ)
adj, flyer or flyest
1. chiefly Brit knowing and sharp; smart
2. chiefly Scot furtive or sneaky
n
on the fly chiefly Scot in secret; sneakily
[C19: of uncertain origin]

fly1

(flaɪ)

v. flew, for 11, 19, flied, flown, fly•ing, v.i.
1. to move through the air using wings.
2. to be carried through the air or through space by any force or agency.
3. to float or flutter in the air: flags flying in the breeze.
4. to travel in an aircraft or spacecraft.
5. to operate an aircraft or spacecraft.
6. to move suddenly and quickly; start unexpectedly: He flew out of the room.
7. to change rapidly and unexpectedly from one state or position to another: to fly into a rage; The door flew open.
8. to flee; escape.
9. to move or pass swiftly: How time flies!
10. to move with an aggressive surge.
11. to bat a fly ball in baseball.
12. Informal. to be acceptable, believable, feasible, or successful: It seemed like a good idea, but it just wouldn't fly.
v.t.
13. to make (something) float or move through the air: to fly a kite.
14. to operate (an aircraft or spacecraft).
15. to hoist aloft, as for display or signaling: to fly a flag.
16. to operate an aircraft or spacecraft over: to fly the Pacific.
17. to transport or convey by air.
18. to escape from; flee.
19.
a. to hang (scenery) above a stage by means of rigging.
b. to raise (scenery) from the stage into the flies.
20. fly at, to attack suddenly; lash out at.
21. fly out, to make an out in baseball by hitting a fly ball that is caught by a player of the opposing team.
n.
22. a strip of material sewn along one edge of a garment opening to conceal a zipper, buttons, or other fasteners.
23. a flap forming the door of a tent.
24. a piece of fabric extending over the ridgepole of a tent and forming an outer roof.
25. an act of flying; flight.
26. the course of a flying object, as a ball.
27. fly ball.
28. a regulating device for chime and striking mechanisms, consisting of an arrangement of vanes on a revolving axis.
29.
a. the horizontal dimension of a flag as flown from a vertical staff.
b. the end of the flag farther from the staff. Compare hoist (def. 6).
30. flies. Also called fly loft. the space above the stage used chiefly for storing scenery and equipment.
Idioms:
1. fly high, to be full of hope or elation.
2. fly in the face or teeth of, to act in brazen defiance of: to fly in the face of tradition.
3. fly off the handle, Informal. to become very angry, esp. without warning.
4. let fly,
a. to hurl or propel (an object).
b. to give free rein to one's anger.
5. on the fly,
a. during flight; while in the air.
b. hurriedly; without pausing.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English flēogan]
fly′a•ble, adj.
fly`a•bil′i•ty, n.

fly2

(flaɪ)

n., pl. flies.
1. any of numerous two-winged insects of the order Diptera, esp. of the family Muscidae, as the common housefly.
2. any of various winged insects, as the mayfly or firefly.
3. a fishhook dressed with feathers, silk, tinsel, etc., so as to resemble an insect or small fish, for use as a lure or bait.
Idioms:
1. fly in the ointment, something that spoils an otherwise pleasant thing; detriment.
2. fly on the wall, an invisible bystander, secretly watching and listening.
[before 950; Middle English flīe, Old English flēoge, flȳge]
fly′less, adj.

fly3

(flaɪ)

adj. Slang.
1. Brit. clever.
2. stylish; fine.
[of uncertain orig.]

Fly

(flaɪ)
n.
a river in New Guinea, flowing SE from the central part to the Gulf of Papua, ab. 800 mi. (1290 km) long.

fly

(flī)
Any of numerous insects having one pair of wings and large compound eyes. Flies include the houseflies, horseflies, and mosquitoes. Many species feed on other insects or as scavengers.

fly


Past participle: flown
Gerund: flying

Imperative
fly
fly
Present
I fly
you fly
he/she/it flies
we fly
you fly
they fly
Preterite
I flew
you flew
he/she/it flew
we flew
you flew
they flew
Present Continuous
I am flying
you are flying
he/she/it is flying
we are flying
you are flying
they are flying
Present Perfect
I have flown
you have flown
he/she/it has flown
we have flown
you have flown
they have flown
Past Continuous
I was flying
you were flying
he/she/it was flying
we were flying
you were flying
they were flying
Past Perfect
I had flown
you had flown
he/she/it had flown
we had flown
you had flown
they had flown
Future
I will fly
you will fly
he/she/it will fly
we will fly
you will fly
they will fly
Future Perfect
I will have flown
you will have flown
he/she/it will have flown
we will have flown
you will have flown
they will have flown
Future Continuous
I will be flying
you will be flying
he/she/it will be flying
we will be flying
you will be flying
they will be flying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been flying
you have been flying
he/she/it has been flying
we have been flying
you have been flying
they have been flying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been flying
you will have been flying
he/she/it will have been flying
we will have been flying
you will have been flying
they will have been flying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been flying
you had been flying
he/she/it had been flying
we had been flying
you had been flying
they had been flying
Conditional
I would fly
you would fly
he/she/it would fly
we would fly
you would fly
they would fly
Past Conditional
I would have flown
you would have flown
he/she/it would have flown
we would have flown
you would have flown
they would have flown
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fly - two-winged insects characterized by active flightfly - two-winged insects characterized by active flight
Diptera, order Diptera - a large order of insects having a single pair of wings and sucking or piercing mouths; includes true flies and mosquitoes and gnats and crane flies
dipteran, dipteron, dipterous insect, two-winged insects - insects having usually a single pair of functional wings (anterior pair) with the posterior pair reduced to small knobbed structures and mouth parts adapted for sucking or lapping or piercing
alula, calypter - scalelike structure between the base of the wing and the halter of a two-winged fly
house fly, housefly, Musca domestica - common fly that frequents human habitations and spreads many diseases
glossina, tsetse, tsetse fly, tzetze, tzetze fly - bloodsucking African fly; transmits sleeping sickness etc.
blow fly, blowfly - large usually hairy metallic blue or green fly; lays eggs in carrion or dung or wounds
flesh fly, Sarcophaga carnaria - fly whose larvae feed on carrion or the flesh of living animals
tachina fly - bristly fly whose larvae live parasitically in caterpillars and other insects; important in control of noxious insects
gadfly - any of various large flies that annoy livestock
bee fly - hairy nectar-eating fly that resembles a bee; larvae are parasitic on larvae of bees and related insects
Haematobia irritans, horn fly - small black European fly introduced into North America; sucks blood from cattle especially at the base of the horn
2.fly - flap consisting of a piece of canvas that can be drawn back to provide entrance to a tentfly - flap consisting of a piece of canvas that can be drawn back to provide entrance to a tent
flap - any broad thin and limber covering attached at one edge; hangs loose or projects freely; "he wrote on the flap of the envelope"
fly tent - a tent with a fly front
3.fly - an opening in a garment that is closed by a zipper or by buttons concealed under a fold of cloth
garment - an article of clothing; "garments of the finest silk"
opening - a vacant or unobstructed space that is man-made; "they left a small opening for the cat at the bottom of the door"
4.fly - (baseball) a hit that flies up in the airfly - (baseball) a hit that flies up in the air
hitting, striking, hit - the act of contacting one thing with another; "repeated hitting raised a large bruise"; "after three misses she finally got a hit"
blast - a very long fly ball
pop fly, pop-fly, pop-up - a short high fly ball
line drive, liner - (baseball) a hit that flies straight out from the batter; "the batter hit a liner to the shortstop"
flare - (baseball) a fly ball hit a short distance into the outfield
Texas leaguer - (baseball) a fly ball that falls between and infielder and an outfielder
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
5.fly - fisherman's lure consisting of a fishhook decorated to look like an insect
dry fly - a fly (fisherman's lure) that skims the surface of the water
fish lure, fisherman's lure - (angling) any bright artificial bait consisting of plastic or metal mounted with hooks and trimmed with feathers
streamer fly - an artificial fly that has wings extending back beyond the crook of the fishhook
wet fly - fisherman's fly that floats under the surface of the water
Verb1.fly - travel through the air; be airborne; "Man cannot fly"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
fly - travel over (an area of land or sea) in an aircraft; "Lindbergh was the first to fly the Atlantic"
buzz - fly low; "Planes buzzed the crowds in the square"
rack - fly in high wind
flight - fly in a flock; "flighting wild geese"
fly on - continue flying
soar - fly upwards or high in the sky
hover - hang in the air; fly or be suspended above
2.fly - move quickly or suddenly; "He flew about the place"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
3.fly - operate an airplanefly - operate an airplane; "The pilot flew to Cuba"
air travel, aviation, air - travel via aircraft; "air travel involves too much waiting in airports"; "if you've time to spare go by air"
aircraft - a vehicle that can fly
control, operate - handle and cause to function; "do not operate machinery after imbibing alcohol"; "control the lever"
fly - transport by aeroplane; "We fly flowers from the Caribbean to North America"
fly - travel in an airplane; "she is flying to Cincinnati tonight"; "Are we driving or flying?"
fly - travel over (an area of land or sea) in an aircraft; "Lindbergh was the first to fly the Atlantic"
fly blind - fly an airplane solely by relying on instruments
fly contact - fly a plane by using visible landmarks or points of reference
solo - fly alone, without a co-pilot or passengers
test fly - test a plane
jet - fly a jet plane
glide - fly in or as if in a glider plane
hydroplane, seaplane - glide on the water in a hydroplane
balloon - ride in a hot-air balloon; "He tried to balloon around the earth but storms forced him to land in China"
flat-hat, hedgehop - fly very close to the ground
hang glide, soar - fly by means of a hang glider
4.fly - transport by aeroplane; "We fly flowers from the Caribbean to North America"
carry, transport - move while supporting, either in a vehicle or in one's hands or on one's body; "You must carry your camping gear"; "carry the suitcases to the car"; "This train is carrying nuclear waste"; "These pipes carry waste water into the river"
airlift, lift - fly people or goods to or from places not accessible by other means; "Food is airlifted into Bosnia"
aviate, pilot, fly - operate an airplane; "The pilot flew to Cuba"
5.fly - cause to fly or float; "fly a kite"
kite - fly a kite; "Kids were kiting in the park"; "They kited the Red Dragon model"
fly - display in the air or cause to float; "fly a kite"; "All nations fly their flags in front of the U.N."
6.fly - be dispersed or disseminated; "Rumors and accusations are flying"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
7.fly - change quickly from one emotional state to another; "fly into a rage"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
8.fly - pass away rapidlyfly - pass away rapidly; "Time flies like an arrow"; "Time fleeing beneath him"
vaporize, vanish, fly - decrease rapidly and disappear; "the money vanished in las Vegas"; "all my stock assets have vaporized"
elapse, glide by, go by, slide by, slip by, slip away, go along, pass, lapse - pass by; "three years elapsed"
9.fly - travel in an airplane; "she is flying to Cincinnati tonight"; "Are we driving or flying?"
air travel, aviation, air - travel via aircraft; "air travel involves too much waiting in airports"; "if you've time to spare go by air"
red-eye - travel on an overnight flight; "The candidate red-eyed from California to the East Coast the night before the election to give a last stump speech"
travel - undergo transportation as in a vehicle; "We travelled North on Rte. 508"
aviate, pilot, fly - operate an airplane; "The pilot flew to Cuba"
10.fly - display in the air or cause to float; "fly a kite"; "All nations fly their flags in front of the U.N."
fly - cause to fly or float; "fly a kite"
show - make visible or noticeable; "She showed her talent for cooking"; "Show me your etchings, please"
11.fly - run away quickly; "He threw down his gun and fled"
break - make a rupture in the ranks of the enemy or one's own by quitting or fleeing; "The ranks broke"
stampede - run away in a stampede
abscond, absquatulate, go off, make off, run off, decamp, bolt - run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along; "The thief made off with our silver"; "the accountant absconded with the cash from the safe"
elope, run off - run away secretly with one's beloved; "The young couple eloped and got married in Las Vegas"
escape, get away, break loose - run away from confinement; "The convicted murderer escaped from a high security prison"
fly the coop, head for the hills, hightail it, lam, run away, scarper, scat, take to the woods, turn tail, run, bunk, break away, escape - flee; take to one's heels; cut and run; "If you see this man, run!"; "The burglars escaped before the police showed up"
high-tail - retreat at full speed; "The actress high-tailed to her villa when reporters began to follow her to the restaurant"
defect, desert - desert (a cause, a country or an army), often in order to join the opposing cause, country, or army; "If soldiers deserted Hitler's army, they were shot"
12.fly - travel over (an area of land or sea) in an aircraft; "Lindbergh was the first to fly the Atlantic"
journey, travel - travel upon or across; "travel the oceans"
fly, wing - travel through the air; be airborne; "Man cannot fly"
aviate, pilot, fly - operate an airplane; "The pilot flew to Cuba"
13.fly - hit a fly
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
hit - cause to move by striking; "hit a ball"
14.fly - decrease rapidly and disappearfly - decrease rapidly and disappear; "the money vanished in las Vegas"; "all my stock assets have vaporized"
decrease, diminish, lessen, fall - decrease in size, extent, or range; "The amount of homework decreased towards the end of the semester"; "The cabin pressure fell dramatically"; "her weight fell to under a hundred pounds"; "his voice fell to a whisper"
fell, vanish, fly - pass away rapidly; "Time flies like an arrow"; "Time fleeing beneath him"
Adj.1.fly - (British informal) not to be deceived or hoodwinked
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
alert, watchful - engaged in or accustomed to close observation; "caught by a couple of alert cops"; "alert enough to spot the opportunity when it came"; "constantly alert and vigilant, like a sentinel on duty"

fly

1
verb
1. take wing, soar, glide, take to the air, wing, mount, sail, hover, flutter, flit The bird flew away.
2. jet, travel by plane, go by air, travel in an aircraft He flew back to London.
3. pilot, control, operate, steer, manoeuvre, navigate, be at the controls, aviate He flew a small plane to Cuba.
4. airlift, send by plane, take by plane, take in an aircraft The relief supples are being flown from Pisa.
5. flutter, wave, float, flap A flag was flying on the new HQ.
6. display, show, flourish, brandish He sailed in a ship flying a red flag.
7. rush, race, shoot, career, speed, tear, dash, hurry, barrel (along) (informal, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), sprint, bolt, dart, zoom, hare (Brit. informal), hasten, whizz (informal), scoot, scamper, burn rubber (informal), be off like a shot (informal) I flew downstairs.
8. pass swiftly, pass, glide, slip away, roll on, flit, elapse, run its course, go quickly We walked and the time flew by.
9. leave, disappear, get away, depart, run, escape, flee, take off, run from, shun, clear out (informal), light out (informal), abscond, decamp, take flight, do a runner (slang), run for it, cut and run (informal), fly the coop (U.S. & Canad. informal), beat a retreat, make a quick exit, make a getaway, show a clean pair of heels, skedaddle (informal), hightail (informal, chiefly U.S.), take a powder (U.S. & Canad. slang), hasten away, make your escape, take it on the lam (U.S. & Canad. slang), take to your heels I'll have to fly.
fly at someone attack, go for, assault, assail, have a go at (informal), pounce on, fall upon, rush at, get stuck into (informal), pitch into (informal), go for the jugular, lay about, belabour, lash out on Both women flew at each other.
let fly (Informal) lose your temper, lash out, burst forth, keep nothing back, give free rein, let (someone) have it She let fly with a string of obscenities.
let something fly throw, launch, cast, hurl, shoot, fire, fling, chuck (informal), sling, lob (informal), hurtle, let off, heave The midfielder let fly a powerful shot.

fly

2 noun
fly in the ointment problem, difficulty, rub, flaw, hitch, drawback, snag, small problem
Related words
collective nouns swarm, grist

Flies

antlion or antlion fly, aphid or plant louse, aphis, apple blight or American blight, bee fly, beetfly or mangold fly, blackfly or bean aphid, blowfly or bluebottle, botfly, buffalo gnat or black fly, bulb fly, bushfly, carrot fly, chalcid or chalcid fly, cluster fly, crane fly or (Brit.) daddy-longlegs, damselfly, dobsonfly, dragonfly or (colloquial) devil's darning-needle, drosophila, fruit fly, or vinegar fly, fly, frit fly, fruit fly, gadfly, gallfly, gnat, grannom, greenbottle, greenfly, horsefly or cleg, housefly, hover fly, lacewing, lantern fly, mayfly or dayfly, Mediterranean fruit fly or Medfly, needle fly, onion fly, robber fly, bee killer, or assassin fly, sandfly, scorpion fly, screwworm fly, silverhorn, snake fly, stable fly, stonefly, tachina fly, tsetse fly or tzetze fly, vinegar fly, warble fly, whitefly, willow fly

fly

3
adjective (Slang, chiefly Brit.) cunning, knowing, sharp, smart, careful, shrewd, astute, on the ball (informal), canny, wide-awake, nobody's fool, not born yesterday He is devious and very fly.

fly

verb
1. To move through the air with or as if with wings:
2. To move or cause to move about while being fixed at one edge:
3. To pass quickly and lightly through the air:
5. To break loose and leave suddenly, as from confinement or from a difficult or threatening situation:
Informal: skip (out).
Slang: lam.
Regional: absquatulate.
Idioms: blow the coop, cut and run, give someone the slip, make a getaway, take flight, take it on the lam.
6. To react explosively or suddenly:
flare (up).
Translations
أزْرار البنطلون الأماميَّهذُبَابَةذُبابَهصُنّارَه لصيد السمك تُشْبِه الذبابهيَطير
mouchaletětmíjetmuškapoklopec
flueflyvegylpflygte
lendama
kärpänenlentäälentoliehureunaohjata
letjetimuha
légyrepül
terbang
fljúgaflugaflÿjageysast, fljúgaklauf
ハエ飛ぶ
날다파리
skristi
lidotmušamušiņapilotētskriet
muscăzbura
letieťmucharázporokzapínanie
letetimuhapilotirati
muvaмува
flugaflyga
บินแมลงวัน
sinekuçmakuç makuçar gibi geçmekçapari
муха
baycon ruồi

fly

1 [flaɪ]
A. N
1. (= insect) → mosca f
people were dropping like fliesla gente caía como moscas
he wouldn't hurt a flysería incapaz de matar una mosca
there are no flies on himno tiene un pelo de tonto
the fly in the ointmentla única pega, el único inconveniente
I wish I were a fly on the wallme gustaría estar allí para ver qué pasa
2. (on trousers) (also flies) → bragueta f
3. flies (Theat) → peine msing, telar msing
4. (= carriage) → calesa f
5. to do sth on the flyhacer algo por la vía rápida, hacer algo a la carrera
B. CPD fly button Nbotón m de la bragueta
fly spray N(espray) m matamoscas m inv

fly

2 [flaɪ] (flew (pt) (flown (pp)))
A. VI
1. (= be airborne) [plane, bird, insect] → volar; [air passengers] → ir en avión
"how did you get here?" - "I flew"-¿cómo llegaste aquí? -en avión
do you fly often?¿viajas mucho en avión?
she's flying home tomorrowsale en avión para casa mañana
I'm flying back to New York tonightesta noche tomo un vuelo de regreso a Nueva York
we were flying at 5,000ftvolábamos a 5.000 pies de altura
we fly (with) Iberiavolamos con Iberia
to fly into London airportllegar (en avión) al aeropuerto de Londres
the plane flew over Londonel avión sobrevoló Londres
to be flying high we were flying high after our success in the championshipestábamos como locos tras el éxito en el campeonato
the company is flying highla empresa va viento en popa
see also bird
2. (= fly a plane) → pilotar un avión, volar
to learn to flyaprender a pilotar un avión or a volar
to fly blind (lit) → volar a ciegas or guiándose sólo por los instrumentos (fig) → ir a ciegas
3. (= flutter, wave) [flag] → ondear
her hair was flying in the windsu pelo ondeaba al viento
see also flag
4. (= move quickly) the dust flew in our eyesse nos metió el polvo en los ojos
my hat flew into the airse me voló el sombrero, el sombrero salió volando
her hand flew to her mouthse llevó la mano a la boca
the train was flying alongel tren iba como una exhalación
rumours are flying around the office thatpor la oficina corre el rumor de que ...
to go flying the vase went flyingel jarrón salió por los aires or salió volando
to let fly (fig) (verbally) → empezar a despotricar; (physically) → empezar a repartir golpes or tortazos (Ftbl) (= shoot) → disparar
he let fly with a shot from 20 metreslanzó un disparo desde unos 20 metros
to let fly at sb (verbally) → empezar a despotricar contra algn, arremeter contra algn; (physically) → arremeter contra algn, empezar a dar golpes or tortazos a algn
the door flew openla puerta se abrío de golpe
he/the ball came flying past meél/la pelota pasó volando junto a
to fly into a ragemontar en cólera
the blow sent him flyingel golpe hizo que saliera despedido
she kicked off her shoes and sent them flying across the roomde una patada se quitó los zapatos y los mandó volando al otro lado de la habitación
see also spark
5. (= rush) → ir volando, ir corriendo
I must fly!¡me voy volando or corriendo!, ¡me tengo que ir volando or corriendo!
she flew upstairs to look for itsubió volando or a toda prisa a buscarlo
to fly to sb's aid or assistanceir volando a socorrer a algn
to fly to sb's sidevolar al lado de algn
to fly at sb (physically) → lanzarse sobre algn, arremeter contra algn (fig) → ponerse furioso con algn
the dog flew at him and bit himel perro se lanzó or se abalanzó sobre él y le mordió
to fly in the face of sthir en contra de algo, desafiar algo
ideas that fly in the face of common senseideas que desafían el sentido común
she has a reputation for flying in the face of authoritytiene fama de ir en contra de la autoridad
see also handle
6. (= pass quickly) [time] → pasar or irse volando
the years flew bylos años pasaron volando
7. (o.f.) (= flee) → huir, escaparse (from de)
B. VT
1. [+ aircraft] → pilotar, pilotear (esp LAm); [+ passenger] → llevar en avión; [+ goods] → transportar en avión; [+ distance] → recorrer (en avión); [+ flag] → enarbolar
to fly the Atlanticatravesar el Atlántico en avión
which routes does the airline fly?¿qué rutas cubre la aerolínea?
to fly a kitehacer volar una cometa
2. (= flee) [+ country] → abandonar, huir de
to fly the nestechar a volar, dejar or abandonar el nido
to fly the cooptomar las de Villadiego, agarrar or tomar el portante (y marcharse)
fly away VI + ADV [bird] → salir volando, emprender el vuelo
fly in
A. VI + ADV [plane] → llegar; [person] → llegar en avión
he flew in from Romellegó en avión desde Roma
a bee flew in through the windowuna abeja entró volando por la ventana
B. VT + ADV [+ supplies, troops] (= take) → llevar en avión; (= bring) → traer en avión
the seafood was flown in from Hawaiiel marisco venía en avión desde Hawai
fly off VI + ADV
1. [bird, plane] → alejarse volando; [person in plane] → marcharse (en avión) (to a) I'd love to fly off to a Caribbean islandme encantaría marcharme a una isla del Caribe
2. (= come off) [hat] → salir volando; [lid, handle, wheel] → saltar, salir disparado
sparks flew off in all directionssaltaban chispas por todos lados
fly out
A. VI + ADV [person in plane] → salir en avión, irse en avión; [plane] → salir
... and we're flying out two weeks latery nosotros salimos or nos vamos en avión para allá dos semanas después
I had to fly out to California to pick him uptuve que ir en avión a California a recogerlo
B. VT + ADV
1. (= take out) we shall fly supplies out to themles enviaremos provisiones por avión
2. (= bring out) the hostages have been flown outhan sacado a los rehenes en avión

fly

3 [flaɪ] ADJ (esp Brit) → avispado, espabilado

fly

[ˈflaɪ]
n
(= insect) → mouche f
he wouldn't harm a fly, he wouldn't hurt a fly → il ne ferait pas de mal à une mouche
a fly on the wall
I'd love to be a fly on the wall → J'aimerais être une petite souris. fly-on-the-wall documentary
(also flies) (on trousers)braguette f
to do sth on the fly → faire qch sur-le-champ
vb [flew] [ˈfluː] (pt) [flown] [ˈfləʊn] (pp)
vt
[+ plane] → piloter
[+ passengers, cargo] → transporter (par avion)
[+ distance] → parcourir
vi
[plane] → voler; [bird] → voler
The plane flies at a speed of 400 km per hour → L'avion vole à quatre cents kilomètres à l'heure.
[passenger] → aller en avion
He flew from Paris to New York → Il est allé de Paris à New York en avion.
He flew back to London
BUT Il est revenu à Londres en avion.
[pilot] → piloter un avion
(= hurry) → filer
She came flying into the room
BUT Elle est entrée à toute allure dans la pièce.
I must fly
BUT Il faut que je me sauve.
(= escape) → s'enfuir, fuir
[flag] → flotter
[hair] → flotter
to fly open → s'ouvrir brusquement
(= fall) to go flying → tomber
to send sb flying → envoyer voler qn
to let fly at sb (physically)se jeter sur qn; (verbally)insulter qn
fly away
vis'envoler
The bird flew away → L'oiseau s'est envolé.
fly in
vi
[plane] → atterrir
[person]
He flew in yesterday → Il est arrivé hier (par avion).
fly into
vt fus
to fly into a rage → se mettre en rage
fly off
vi
[bird] → s'envoler
(= fall off)
Her glasses flew off → Ses lunettes sont tombées.
vt
to fly off the handle → sortir de ses gonds, s'emporter
fly out
vi [passenger] → s'envoler, partir (par avion)
vt sep (= take away) → évacuer par avionfly-button [ˈflaɪbətən] nbouton m de braguettefly-by-night [ˈflaɪbaɪnaɪt]
n (= uncommitted person) → tout-fou m
adj
(= cowboy) [firm, operation, operator] → véreux/euse
[affair, liaison] → passager/èrefly-drive holiday nformule f avion plus voiture

fly

:
flyaway
adj hairfliegend, schwer zu bändigen
fly-by-night
n
(= irresponsible man)Windhund m (inf); (= woman)leichtsinniges Ding (inf)
(= decamping debtor)flüchtiger Schuldner, flüchtige Schuldnerin
adj
(Fin, Comm) firm, operationzweifelhaft, windig (inf)
flycatcher
n
Fliegenschnäpper m
(= trap for flies)Fliegenfänger m
fly-fishing
nFliegenfischen nt
fly half
n (Rugby) → Halbspieler m

fly

:
flyleaf
nVorsatzblatt nt
flyover
nÜberführung f; (US: = fly-past) → Luftparade f
flypaper
fly-past
n (Brit) → Luftparade f
flyposting
nillegales Plakatekleben
fly sheet
n (= entrance)Überdach nt; (= outer tent)Überzelt nt
fly spray
nFliegenspray m
fly swat(ter)
fly-tipping
nillegales Müllabladen
flytrap
n (Bot) → Fliegenfalle f
flyway
n (Orn) → Zuglinie f
flyweight
n (Boxing) → Fliegengewicht nt
flywheel
nSchwungrad nt

fly

1
nFliege f; they were dying like fliessie starben wie die Fliegen; small retailers are dropping like flieskleine Einzelhändler gehen massenweise ein (inf); he wouldn’t hurt or harm a flyer könnte keiner Fliege etwas zuleide or zu Leide tun; that’s the only fly in the ointment (inf)das ist das einzige Haar in der Suppe; he’s the fly in the ointmenter ist Sand im Getriebe; there are no flies on him (Brit inf) → ihn legt man nicht so leicht rein (inf); to be a fly on the wallMäuschen sein or spielen

fly

2 vb: pret <flew>, ptp <flown>
vi
(person, bird, insect, aircraft etc)fliegen
(= move quickly, time) → (ver)fliegen; (people)sausen (inf), → fliegen; (sparks)stieben, fliegen; time flies!wie die Zeit vergeht!; the company is flying highdie Firma will hoch hinaus; I’m already late, I must flyich bin schon spät dran, ich muss jetzt wirklich sausen (inf); the door flew opendie Tür flog auf; to fly to somebody’s sidean jds Seite eilen; to fly into a rageeinen Wutanfall bekommen; to fly at somebody (inf)auf jdn losgehen; to let fly at somebodyauf jdn losgehen; he really let flyer legte kräftig los; (verbally also) → er zog kräftig vom Leder; to knock or send somebody/something flyingjdn/etw umschmeißen (inf)or umwerfen; he sent the ball flying over the waller schleuderte or schmiss (inf)den Ball über die Mauer; to go flying (person)hinfallen; (object)runterfallen; stories are flying around the officeim Büro gehen Geschichten um
to fly in the face of authority/traditionsich über jede Autorität/alle Traditionen hinwegsetzen; to fly in the face of reason (person, organization)sich über jede Vernunft hinwegsetzen; (idea, theory etc)jeder Vernunft entbehren
(flag, hair)wehen
vt
aircraftfliegen; kitesteigen lassen
passengers, route, planefliegen; Atlanticüberfliegen
flagführen, wehen lassen ? flag1
n to go for a flyfliegen

fly

3 pret <flew>, ptp <flown>
vi (= flee)fliehen, flüchten; to fly for one’s lifeum sein Leben laufen/fahren etc
vt to fly the countryaus dem Land flüchten

fly

4
n
(on trousers) → (Hosen)schlitz m
flies pl (Theat) → Obermaschinerie f

fly

5 (Brit inf)
adjclever, gerissen
n on the fly (= quickly)schnell, prompt; (= spontaneously)spontan; (= while moving)in Bewegung, aus der Bewegung heraus

fly

1 [flaɪ] n (insect) → mosca
he wouldn't hurt a fly → non farebbe male a una mosca
they were dropping like flies → morivano come mosche
the fly in the ointment (fig) → la piccola pecca che sciupa tutto
there are no flies on him (fig) → non è nato ieri, non si fa prendere per il naso

fly

2 [flaɪ] (flew (vb: pp) (flown (pt)))
1. vi
a. (gen) → volare; (passengers) → andare in aereo; (flag) → sventolare
the plane flew over London → l'aereo ha sorvolato Londra
b. (move quickly, time) → volare, passare in fretta
to fly past sb (subj, car, person) → sfrecciare davanti a qn
the door flew open → la porta si è spalancata all'improvviso
to knock or send sth/sb flying → far volare qc/qn
I must fly! → devo scappare!
to let fly at sb → scagliarsi contro qn
to fly into a rage → infuriarsi
to fly off the handle → perdere le staffe
c. (flee) → fuggire, scappare
to fly for one's life → salvare la pelle scappando
2. vt (aircraft) → pilotare; (passenger, cargo) → trasportare (in aereo); (distances) → percorrere; (flag) → battere
to fly the Atlantic → sorvolare l'Atlantico
to fly a kite → far volare un aquilone
3. n (on trousers) (also flies) → patta
fly away vi + advvolar via
fly in
1. vi + adv (plane) → arrivare; (person) → arrivare in aereo
he flew in from Rome → è venuto da Roma in aereo
2. vt + adv (supplies, troops) → trasportare in aereo
fly off vi + advvolare via
fly out vi + adv (plane) → partire; (person) → partire in aereo

fly1

(flai) plural flies
nou.
1. a type of small winged insect.
2. a fish hook made to look like a fly so that a fish will take it in its mouth. Which fly should I use to catch a trout?
3. (often in plural) a piece of material with buttons or a zip, especially at the front of trousers.
a fly in the ointment
something that spoils one's enjoyment.

fly2

(flai) past tense flew (fluː) : past participle flown (floun) verb
1. to (make something) go through the air on wings etc or in an aeroplane. The pilot flew (the plane) across the sea.
2. to run away (from). He flew (the country).
3. (of time) to pass quickly. The days flew past.
ˈflyer, ˈflier noun
1. a person who flies an aeroplane etc or is in one.
2. a sheet of paper advertising a product, event etc. handing out flyers to passers-by.
flying saucer
a strange flying object thought possibly to come from another planet.
flying visit
a very short, often unexpected, visit. She paid her mother a flying visit.
frequent flyer/flier noun
a passenger who flies frequently in the same airline and receives bonuses accordingly.
ˈflyleaf noun
a blank page at the beginning or end of a book.
ˈflyover noun
a road etc which is built up so as to cross above another. a flyover across the motorway.
fly in the face of
to oppose or defy; to treat with contempt. He flew in the face of danger.
fly into
suddenly to get into (a rage, a temper etc).
fly off the handle
to lose one's temper.
get off to a flying start
to have a very successful beginning. Our new shop has got off to a flying start.
let fly (often with at)
to throw, shoot or send out violently. He let fly (an arrow) at the target.
send (someone/something) flying
to hit or knock someone or something so that he or it falls down or falls backwards. She hit him and sent him flying.

fly

ذُبَابَة, يَطيرُ letět, moucha flue, flyve Fliege, fliegen μύγα, πετώ mosca, volar kärpänen, lentää mouche, voler letjeti, muha mosca, volare ハエ, 飛ぶ 날다, 파리 vlieg, vliegen fly, smekk mucha, polecieć mosca, voar летать, муха fluga, flyga แมลงวัน, บิน sinek, uçmak bay, con ruồi 苍蝇, 飞翔

fly

n. mosca;
vt. volar.

fly

n (pl flies) mosca
References in classic literature ?
How would you like to be shut up for hours with a nervous, fussy old lady, who keeps you trotting, is never satisfied, and worries you till you you're ready to fly out the window or cry?
Her shoulders shook and she seemed about to fly into a fit of temper.
These vampire bats fly from place to place in great swarms, and they are so large and blood-thirsty that a few of them can kill a horse or an ox in a short time by sucking its blood.
Sometimes I rode north to the big prairie-dog town to watch the brown earth-owls fly home in the late afternoon and go down to their nests underground with the dogs.
It is something to squander and throw to the four winds, for the fun of seeing the golden specks fly.
said Cora, advancing from the place where natural horror had, until this moment, held her riveted to the rock; "the path is open on every side; fly, then, to the woods, and call on God for succor.
At least, I don't think it would look quite decent for you to fly back without your father, at his suggestion," said Christie coldly.
Don't it seem to you they'd be in a sad case, if, some pleasant summer morning like this, the angel should spread his wings, and fly to the place he came from?
But while she said it, Pearl laughed, and began to dance up and down with the humoursome gesticulation of a little imp, whose next freak might be to fly up the chimney.
Ichabod, on the contrary, had to win his way to the heart of a country coquette, beset with a labyrinth of whims and caprices, which were forever presenting new difficulties and impediments; and he had to encounter a host of fearful adversaries of real flesh and blood, the numerous rustic admirers, who beset every portal to her heart, keeping a watchful and angry eye upon each other, but ready to fly out in the common cause against any new competitor.
This convenience, I was told, had been ordered, and I found, toward the close of the June afternoon, a commodious fly in waiting for me.
But in that gale, the port, the land, is that ship's direst jeopardy; she must fly all hospitality; one touch of land, though it but graze the keel, would make her shudder through and through.