fly off the handle


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Related to fly off the handle: on cloud nine, dropping like flies

fly 1

 (flī)
v. flew (flo͞o), flown (flōn), fly·ing, flies (flīz)
v.intr.
1. To engage in flight, especially:
a. To move through the air by means of wings or winglike parts.
b. To travel by air: We flew to Dallas.
c. To operate an aircraft or spacecraft.
2.
a. To rise in or be carried through the air by the wind: a kite flying above the playground.
b. To float or flap in the air: pennants flying from the masthead.
3. To move or be sent through the air with great speed: bullets flying in every direction; a plate that flew from my hands when I stumbled.
4.
a. To move with great speed; rush or dart: The children flew down the hall.
b. To be communicated to many people: Rumors are flying about their breakup.
c. To flee; escape.
d. To hasten; spring: flew to her students' defense.
5. To pass by swiftly: a vacation flying by.
6. To be dissipated; vanish: All his money has flown.
7. past tense and past participle flied (flīd) Baseball To hit a fly ball.
8.
a. To shatter or explode: The dropped plate flew into pieces.
b. To become suddenly emotional, especially angry: The driver flew into a rage.
9. Informal To gain acceptance or approval; go over: "However sophisticated the reasoning, this particular notion may not fly" (New York Times).
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to fly or float in the air: fly a kite; fly a flag.
b. Nautical To operate under (a particular flag): a tanker that flies the Liberian flag.
2.
a. To pilot (an aircraft or spacecraft).
b. To carry or transport in an aircraft or spacecraft: fly emergency supplies to a stricken area.
c. To pass over or through in flight: flew the coastal route in record time.
d. To perform in a spacecraft or aircraft: flew six missions into space.
3.
a. To flee or run from: fly a place in panic.
b. To avoid; shun: fly temptation.
n. pl. flies
1. The act of flying; flight.
2.
a. The opening, or the fastening that closes this opening, on the front of a pair of pants.
b. The flap of cloth that covers this opening.
3. A piece of protective fabric secured over a tent and often extended over the entrance.
4. A flyleaf.
5. Baseball A fly ball.
6. Sports In swimming, butterfly.
7.
a. The span of a flag from the staff to the outer edge.
b. The outer edge of a flag.
8. A flywheel.
9. flies The area directly over the stage of a theater, containing overhead lights, drop curtains, and equipment for raising and lowering sets.
10. Chiefly British A one-horse carriage, especially one for hire.
Phrasal Verb:
fly at
To attack fiercely; assault: The dogs flew at each other's throats.
Idioms:
fly high
To be elated: They were flying high after their first child was born.
fly off the handle Informal
To become suddenly enraged: flew off the handle when the train was finally canceled.
let fly
1. To shoot, hurl, or release: The troops let fly a volley of gunfire.
2. To lash out; assault: The mayor let fly with an angry attack on her critics.
on the fly
1. In a hurry or between pressing activities: took lunch on the fly.
2. While moving: The outfielder caught the ball on the fly.
3. In the air; in flight: The ball carried 500 feet on the fly.
4. While activity is ongoing: A coach can change players on the fly in hockey. This computer program compiles on the fly when a script is executed.

[Middle English flien, from Old English flēogan; see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]

fly′a·ble adj.

fly 2

 (flī)
n. pl. flies
1.
a. Any of numerous two-winged insects of the order Diptera, especially any of the family Muscidae, which includes the housefly.
b. Any of various other flying insects, such as a caddisfly.
2. A fishing lure simulating something a fish eats, such as a mayfly or a minnow, made by attaching materials such as feathers, tinsel, and colored thread to a fishhook.
Idiom:
fly in the ointment
A detrimental circumstance or detail; a drawback.

[Middle English flie, from Old English flēoge; see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]

fly 3

 (flī)
adj.
1. Chiefly British Mentally alert; sharp.
2. Slang Fashionable; stylish.

[Probably from fly.]

fly off the handle

To suddenly become very angry; from a frontiersman’s anger when the head of a poorly-made ax came off while he was attempting to swing it.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.fly off the handle - get very angry and fly into a rage; "The professor combusted when the student didn't know the answer to a very elementary question"; "Spam makes me go ballistic"
rage - feel intense anger; "Rage against the dying of the light!"
Translations
يَغْضَبُ، يَثور، يفقِدُ مِزاجَه
rozlobit se
miste besindelsen
aus der Haut fahrenhochgehen

fly2

(flai) past tense flew (fluː) : past participle flown (floun) verb
1. to (make something) go through the air on wings etc or in an aeroplane. The pilot flew (the plane) across the sea.
2. to run away (from). He flew (the country).
3. (of time) to pass quickly. The days flew past.
ˈflyer, ˈflier noun
1. a person who flies an aeroplane etc or is in one.
2. a sheet of paper advertising a product, event etc. handing out flyers to passers-by.
flying saucer
a strange flying object thought possibly to come from another planet.
flying visit
a very short, often unexpected, visit. She paid her mother a flying visit.
frequent flyer/flier noun
a passenger who flies frequently in the same airline and receives bonuses accordingly.
ˈflyleaf noun
a blank page at the beginning or end of a book.
ˈflyover noun
a road etc which is built up so as to cross above another. a flyover across the motorway.
fly in the face of
to oppose or defy; to treat with contempt. He flew in the face of danger.
fly into
suddenly to get into (a rage, a temper etc).
fly off the handle
to lose one's temper.
get off to a flying start
to have a very successful beginning. Our new shop has got off to a flying start.
let fly (often with at)
to throw, shoot or send out violently. He let fly (an arrow) at the target.
send (someone/something) flying
to hit or knock someone or something so that he or it falls down or falls backwards. She hit him and sent him flying.
References in classic literature ?
I put up with it as long as I could and then joined in and tried to improve it, but this encouraged young George to join in too, and that made a failure of it; because George's voice was just "turning," and when he was singing a dismal sort of bass it was apt to fly off the handle and startle everybody with a most discordant cackle on the upper notes.
and would fly off the handle at "When I tried to throw him out, he threatened to petrol bomb the house with me and Dinky inside.
He treats newspaper journalists with disdain, regularly telling them their medium is dying, and although he is more cordial with the broadcast media, he is still known to fly off the handle even at MUTV.
Of course, we all get angry but Hull have had a terrific campaign and it was possibly a bit premature for Phil to fly off the handle - from where I'm standing, it looked as if that was their first really bad performance.
He was clearly frustrated and disappointed about what happened in South Africa, but I am not going to fly off the handle about this whole thing.
If you have a high libido you enjoy sex but won't usually fly off the handle if your partner wants an early night.
Prosecutor Adrian Waterman QC said that Martin, 30, was "very fired up, highly likely to fly off the handle at the slightest provocation".