fly-blown


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Related to fly-blown: Cluster fly, bot fly
Translations

fly-blown

[ˈflaɪbləʊn] ADJ (lit) → lleno de cresas (fig) → viejo, gastado
References in classic literature ?
Then there was a man further along who had no eyes, and whose face was the color of a fly-blown beefsteak, and wrinkled and twisted like a lava-flow--and verily so tumbled and distorted were his features that no man could tell the wart that served him for a nose from his cheek-bones.
Shrill flaring gas-jets, dulled and distorted in the fly-blown mirrors that faced them, were ranged round the walls.
In my fly-blown blankets I dreamt of London until I hankered after my chambers and my club more than after much fine gold.
Brown's"; and she confides the card to the gentleman of the Fine Art Repository, who consents to allow it to lie upon the counter, where it grows dingy and fly-blown.
As for the TV portrayal of fly-blown children with their ribs protruding and appear to be starving, how is it that their 'carers' seem well fed when it is considered that they all live in the same environment?
And the band's new five-track EP, entitled Black Eyes Sons sees them back to mining the same fly-blown, gravel -throated charm that won them their legions of fans in the first place.
And the band's new five-track EP, entitled Black Eyed Sons sees them back to mining the same fly-blown, gravel-throated charm that won them their legions of fans in the first place.
And, as a reward Lord Sugar treated them to a ride in the VIP capsule on the London Eye, while the fellas got the opportunity to take a long hard look at themselves in that grim fly-blown roadside cafe where all the series' losers go to chew on their mistakes.
The nurse who handed the baby to me at a fly-blown hospital in the coastal city of Mananjary tells me the child's mother lives in a village which is a a three-hour ride away on a bumpy speedboat down the Panagalanes canal.
The partition of the country, despite all the fly-blown rhetoric since 1922, was still firmly in place.
In a fly-blown wooden hut in the Pakistani coastal village of Rerhy, at the edge of the vast metropolis of Karachi, Hamida mourns her husband Nawaz, once a fisherman like those preparing their multicoloured boats on the nearby shore.