necrosis

(redirected from focal necrosis)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

ne·cro·sis

 (nə-krō′sĭs, nĕ-)
n. pl. ne·cro·ses (-sēz′)
Death of cells through injury or disease, especially in a localized area of a tissue or organ.

[Late Latin necrōsis, a causing to die, killing, from Greek nekrōsis, death, from nekroun, to make dead, from nekros, corpse; see nek- in Indo-European roots.]

ne·crot′ic (-krŏt′ĭk) adj.

necrosis

(nɛˈkrəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Pathology) the death of one or more cells in the body, usually within a localized area, as from an interruption of the blood supply to that part
2. (Botany) death of plant tissue due to disease, frost, etc
[C17: New Latin from Greek nekrōsis, from nekroun to kill, from nekros corpse]
necrotic adj

ne•cro•sis

(nəˈkroʊ sɪs)

n.
death of a circumscribed portion of animal or plant tissue.
[1655–65; < New Latin < Greek nékrōsis state of death = nekrō-, variant s. of nekroûn to kill, mortify]
ne•crot′ic (-ˈkrɒt ɪk) adj.
nec•ro•tize (ˈnɛk rəˌtaɪz) v.i., v.t. -tized, -tiz•ing.

necrosis

the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Body, Human
the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
See also: Death, Decaying
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)necrosis - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)
death - the permanent end of all life functions in an organism or part of an organism; "the animal died a painful death"
myonecrosis - localized death of muscle cell fibers
Translations
nekroosi
afstervingnecrose

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnécrose f

necrosis

[nɛˈkrəʊsɪs] nnecrosi f inv

necrosis

n necrosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
She had no history of asthma; and she had a history of renal AML and received right nephroureterectomy in 2002 (the tumor was composed of smooth muscle, fat, thick-walled blood vessels, and cut surfaces showed focal necrosis [Figure 1]a.
D-GaIN caused panlobular focal necrosis and periportal inflammation, which was accompanied by an inflammatory infiltrate of predominantly polymorph nuclear cells with a few lymphocytes and swollen macrophages (Robert et al.
These data included donor age, gender, body mass index (BMI), biopsy findings (hydrops, sinusoidal dilatation, pigment accumulation, inflammatory infiltration, parenchymal focal necrosis, microvesicular steatosis, and macrovesicular steatosis), graft type, volumetric analysis of the liver calculated by multi-slice computerized tomography (CT) [total liver volume (TLV), functional liver volume (FLV), graft volume (GV), remnant liver volume (RLV), percentage of remnant liver volume to total liver (RLV%), remnant liver to donor body weight ratio (RLBWR)], graft weight after hepatectomy (GW), peri-operative use of blood transfusion, fresh frozen plasma (FFP), amounts of crystalloid and colloid solutions, operation time, as well as intraoperative and postoperative complications.
The pathological changes as size, weight of liver, focal necrosis, zonal necrosis and acute hepatitis were ten to twenty percent reversible in experimental groups at 30th day.
mild degree of cortical and medullary haemorrhage, oedema, focal necrosis and capsular haemorrhage.
Pathology revealed a pT1b, N1, MX, high-grade urothelial tumour with focal necrosis.
Histological examination showed fascicles of hypercellular spindle cells with mitotic figures measuring up to 22/10 HPF, focal necrosis, focal storiform pattern, and staghorn-like vascular pattern, which compatible with HPC [Figure 5].
While treatment with gentamicin plus low doses of levofloxacin resulted in slightly increased focal necrosis of proximal tubules but overall assessment was also that of grade 2 (figure 2 left).
3 Muscle biopsy may show variation in size of muscle fibers, mild focal necrosis and occasionally mild inflammatory infiltrates in contrast to polymyositis, in which inflammation, necrosis and regeneration predominates.
Also observed were randomly distributed foci of neuronal necrosis and mild to moderate lymphocytic perivascular cuffing in the cerebrum and a paucity of cerebellar Purkinje cells and focal necrosis in the cerebellum.
Focal necrosis was be seen in the liver of one out of six animals (16.
Lesions like congestion, consolidations and focal necrosis were present on the surface of lungs as reported by Yagihashi et al.