focused


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fo·cus

 (fō′kəs)
n. pl. fo·cus·es or fo·ci (-sī′, -kī′)
1.
a. The distinctness or clarity of an image rendered by an optical system.
b. The state of maximum distinctness or clarity of such an image: in focus; out of focus.
c. An apparatus used to adjust the focal length of an optical system in order to make an image distinct or clear: a camera with automatic focus.
2.
a. A point at which rays of light or other radiation converge or from which they appear to diverge, as after refraction or reflection in an optical system: the focus of a lens. Also called focal point.
3.
a. A center of interest or activity: "Precisely how diet affects E. coli in livestock is the focus of current research" (Cindy Engel).
b. Close or narrow attention; concentration: "He was forever taken aback by [New York's] pervasive atmosphere of purposefulness—the tight focus of its drivers, the brisk intensity of its pedestrians" (Anne Tyler).
c. A condition in which something can be clearly apprehended or perceived: couldn't get the problem into focus.
4. Medicine The region of a localized bodily infection or disease.
5. Geology The point of origin of an earthquake.
6. Mathematics A fixed point whose relationship with a directrix determines a conic section.
v. fo·cused, fo·cus·ing, fo·cus·es or fo·cussed or fo·cus·sing or fo·cus·ses
v.tr.
1. To cause (light rays, for example) to converge on or toward a central point; concentrate.
2.
a. To render (an object or image) in clear outline or sharp detail by adjustment of one's vision or an optical device; bring into focus.
b. To adjust (a lens, for example) to produce a clear image.
3. To direct toward a particular point or purpose: focused all their attention on finding a solution to the problem.
v.intr.
1. To converge on or toward a central point of focus; be focused.
2. To adjust one's vision or an optical device so as to render a clear, distinct image.
3. To concentrate attention or energy: a campaign that focused on economic issues.

[New Latin, from Latin, hearth (probably in reference to the fact that a lens or parabolic mirror can concentrate sunlight on a single point to start a fire).]

fo′cus·er n.

focused

(ˈfəʊkəst) or

focussed

adj
approving having or showing a clear and definite purpose
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.focused - being in focus or brought into focus
unfocused, unfocussed - (of an image) not being in or brought into focus; "at their edges things were pretty much out of focus"
2.focused - (of light rays) converging on a point; "focused light rays can set something afire"
convergent - tending to come together from different directions
3.focused - of an optical system (e.g. eye or opera glasses) adjusted to produce a clear image
adjusted - altered to accommodate to certain requirements or bring into a proper relation; "an adjusted insurance claim"; "the car runs more smoothly with the timing adjusted"
Translations

focused

focussed [ˈfəʊkəst] adj
(= purposeful) [person] → déterminé(e)
(= targetted) → ciblé(e)focus group ngroupe m de discussion

focus(s)ed

adj (fig)fokussiert
References in classic literature ?
It lies in the fact that an historic character like Alexander I, standing on the highest possible pinnacle of human power with the blinding light of history focused upon him; a character exposed to those strongest of all influences: the intrigues, flattery, and self-deception inseparable from power; a character who at every moment of his life felt a responsibility for all that was happening in Europe; and not a fictitious but a live character who like every man had his personal habits, passions, and impulses toward goodness, beauty, and truth- that this character- though not lacking in virtue
Gongs and drums, banners and flags, are means whereby the ears and eyes of the host may be focused on one particular point.
But irony was not for those people; their mental vision was not focused for it.