foe


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foe

 (fō)
n.
1.
a. A personal enemy or opponent.
b. One who is opposed to an idea or cause: a foe of tax reform.
2. An enemy in war.
3. Something that is destructive or injurious: taxes that were the foe of economic development.

[Middle English fo, from Old English gefā, from fāh, hostile.]

foe

(fəʊ)
n
formal or literary another word for enemy
[Old English fāh hostile; related to Old High German fēhan to hate, Old Norse feikn dreadful; see feud1]

FoE

or

FOE

abbreviation for
(Environmental Science) Friends of the Earth

foe

(foʊ)

n.
1. a person who feels enmity, hatred, or malice toward another; enemy: a bitter foe.
2. a military enemy.
3. an opponent in a game or contest; adversary: a political foe.
4. a person who is opposed in feeling, principle, etc., to something: a foe to progress.
5. a thing that is harmful to or destructive of something.
[before 900; Middle English foo, Old English fāh hostile, gefāh enemy; c. Old High German gafēh at war. compare feud1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.foe - an armed adversary (especially a member of an opposing military force)foe - an armed adversary (especially a member of an opposing military force); "a soldier must be prepared to kill his enemies"
enemy - an opposing military force; "the enemy attacked at dawn"
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
adversary, antagonist, opposer, resister, opponent - someone who offers opposition
besieger - an enemy who lays siege to your position
2.foe - a personal enemy; "they had been political foes for years"
mortal enemy - an enemy who wants to kill you
challenger, competitor, contender, rival, competition - the contestant you hope to defeat; "he had respect for his rivals"; "he wanted to know what the competition was doing"
ally, friend - an associate who provides cooperation or assistance; "he's a good ally in fight"

foe

noun enemy, rival, opponent, adversary, antagonist, foeman (archaic) support any friend, oppose any foe
friend, partner, ally, companion, comrade, confederate, main man (slang, chiefly U.S.), cobber (Austral. or old-fashioned N.Z. informal)

foe

noun
One who is hostile to or opposes the purposes or interests of another:
Translations
عَدو
nepřítel
fjende
vaenlane
vihollinen
ellenség
óvinur
ienaidnieks
nepriateľ

foe

[fəʊ] N (poet) → enemigo m

FOE

[ˌɛfəʊˈiː] n abbr
(=Friends of the Earth) → AT mpl (=Amis de la Terre)
(US) (=Fraternal Order of Eagles) organisation charitable

foe

[ˈfəʊ] nennemi(e) m/f

foe

n (liter)Feind(in) m(f), → Widersacher(in) m(f) (geh)

FOE

[ˌɛfəʊˈiː] n abbr
a. =Friends of the EarthLega Ambiente
b. (Am) =Fraternal Order of Eagles organizzazione filantropica

foe

[fəʊ] n (liter) → nemico/a

foe

(fəu) noun
an enemy. He fought against the foe.
References in classic literature ?
A distinguished personage happened to visit the school that morning, and Amy's beautifully drawn maps received praise, which honor to her foe rankled in the soul of Miss Snow, and caused Miss March to assume the airs of a studious young peacock.
We can fight all the better now the foe is in the open, and we know where he is.
The arm of the latter slowly gave way before the increasing force of the scout, who, suddenly wresting his armed hand from the grasp of the foe, drove the sharp weapon through his naked bosom to the heart.
By this misfortune Clifford became rich; so did Hepzibah; so did our little village maiden, and, through her, that sworn foe of wealth and all manner of conservatism, --the wild reformer,--Holgrave!
But there is still the ruined wall, and near it the stealthy tread of the foe that would win over again his unforgotten triumph.
Scorning a turnstile wheel at her reverend helm, she sported there a tiller; and that tiller was in one mass, curiously carved from the long narrow lower jaw of her hereditary foe.
He only knew that he was wronged, and that the world had wronged him; that the law, that society, with all its powers, had declared itself his foe.
When he finds he is approaching one of those streams, his dread is so lively that he is disposed to fly the track and avoid the implacable foe.
If with the former, then are you the foe of God and man.
Your Missis has not been my friend: she has been my foe.
She tied a knot with flashing eyes, as if it throttled a foe.
I always thought this was business, this was the way to confront the thing, this was the way to take the foe by the throat.