foetal


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Related to foetal: foetal circulation, foetal distress, foetal movement, Foetal alcohol syndrome, Foetal development

foe·tal

 (fēt′l)
adj. Chiefly British
Variant of fetal.

foetal

(ˈfiːtəl)
adj
(Anatomy) a variant spelling of fetal
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.foetal - of or relating to a fetus; "fetal development"
Translations
جَنيني
zárodečný
foster-
magzati
fóstur-
dölüte ait

foetal

fetal (US) [ˈfiːtl] ADJfetal

foetal

[ˈfiːtəl] fetal (US) adj [development] → fœtal(e); [position] → fœtal(e)

foetal

, (esp US) fetal
adjfötal

foetal

fetal (Am) [ˈfiːtl] adjfetale

foetus

(American) fetus (ˈfiːtəs) noun
a young human being, animal, bird etc in the early stages of development before it is born or hatched.
ˈfoetal , (American) ˈfetal adjective
of a foetus. in a foetal position.
References in classic literature ?
Excepting in its foetal state, Man is without a tail, a
Some of the cases of rudimentary organs are extremely curious; for instance, the presence of teeth in foetal whales, which when grown up have not a tooth in their heads; and the presence of teeth, which never cut through the gums, in the upper jaws of our unborn calves.
He publicly asked the question: 'Would it not be possible to judge the state of health or illness of the foetus from the variations in the strength and frequency of the foetal heart beat?
The clinicians of the time saw the development of mediate auscultation as beneficial for determining fetal life and foetal demise.
John Moir, a medical officer and teacher of midwifery to nurses and doctors, introduced the practice of foetal auscultation to The Edinburgh Lying-in Hospital after being impressed by its practicality by Fergusson and Kennedy in Dublin.
Simpson described the slowing of the foetal heart; 1866 at the Rotunda, Fleetwood Churchill used forceps, that he designed and made, to deliver babies with good neonatal outcomes, when there was a weakening of the fetal heart; 1876 McClintock, at the Edinburgh Lying-In, observed poor outcomes in those fetuses with slowing fetal hearts; 1886 Galabin in London observed good outcomes with those fetuses whose heart rate increased 20 beats per minute with movements compared with those whose heart rates did not increase; Jaggard correlated fetal bradycardia following Braxton Hicks contractions with a "puny foetus" in 1888.
Over the years, maternal perception of foetal movement has become recognised as a valuable tool for early detection of foetal compromise.
Keywords: knowledge; foetal movements monitoring; perinatal outcome
Foetal movement counting--often called 'kick counting'--represents a maneuver whereby a mother can help monitor the movements of her unborn baby by counting the number of kicks in a given time period.
For an analysis of the evidence about light drinking and the confusion of the categories of binge drinking and light drinking see Genevieve Knupfer, "Abstaining for Foetal Health: The Fiction that Even Light Drinking Is Dangerous," British Journal of Addiction 86 (1991): 1063-73.