foetal movement


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Related to foetal movement: fetal movement
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Noun1.foetal movement - motion of a fetus within the uterus (usually detected by the 16th week of pregnancy)
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
maternity, pregnancy, gestation - the state of being pregnant; the period from conception to birth when a woman carries a developing fetus in her uterus
References in periodicals archive ?
Standard Configuration: Fhr, Toco, Foetal Movement.
There had been no indication that anything could be wrong until she felt no foetal movement and a hospital check found no heartbeat.
Foetal movement, even when the mother is unaware of it, raises her heart rate and her skin conductivity, signals of emotion-and perhaps of pre-natal preparation for mother-child bonding.
The purpose of the second article was to determine the knowledge pregnant mothers have on the monitoring of foetal movement and its effect on perinatal outcome, and the findings were used to develop the content of a health education programme that is contextual and relevant to the needs of the pregnant mothers.
Demise is caused by entanglement of the umbilical cords due to foetal movement.
A further confounding fact is that reduced foetal movement is one of the most common symptoms before stillbirth, but quite often there's a delay between the baby dying and confirmation by a midwife or doctor.
Over the years, maternal perception of foetal movement has become recognised as a valuable tool for early detection of foetal compromise.
It follows that impaired maternal thyroid function could also influence foetal movement," he added.
Asked if she felt foetal movement, she said: "I had all sorts of feelings.
Our findings concur with others that stress and depression have a significant impact on foetal movements, and need to be controlled for, but additionally these results point to the fact that nicotine exposure per se has an effect on foetal development over and above the effects of stress and depression.
A clear theme running through the evidence we received is the link between reduced foetal movements, restricted foetal growth - that is, a baby growing too slowly in the womb - and stillbirths.