foible


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foi·ble

 (foi′bəl)
n.
1. A minor weakness or failing of character.
2. The weaker section of a sword blade, from the middle to the tip.

[Obsolete French foible, weak point of a sword, weak, from Old French feble, weak; see feeble.]

foible

(ˈfɔɪbəl)
n
1. a slight peculiarity or minor weakness; idiosyncrasy
2. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) the most vulnerable part of a sword's blade, from the middle to the tip. Compare forte12
[C17: from obsolete French, from obsolete adj: feeble]

foi•ble

(ˈfɔɪ bəl)

n.
1. a minor weakness or failing of character.
2. a quirk or eccentricity of character.
3. the part of a sword or foil blade between the middle and the point, less strong than the forte.
[1640–50; < French, variant of faible feeble]
syn: See fault.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.foible - a behavioral attribute that is distinctive and peculiar to an individualfoible - a behavioral attribute that is distinctive and peculiar to an individual
2.foible - the weaker part of a sword's blade from the forte to the tip
part, portion - something less than the whole of a human artifact; "the rear part of the house"; "glue the two parts together"
sword, steel, blade, brand - a cutting or thrusting weapon that has a long metal blade and a hilt with a hand guard

foible

foible

noun
An imperfection of character:
Translations

foible

[ˈfɔɪbl] Nmanía f

foible

[ˈfɔɪbəl] ntravers m

foible

nEigenheit f

foible

[ˈfɔɪbl] ndebolezza, mania
References in classic literature ?
But this is a harmless little foible in the English whale-hunters, which the Nantucketer does not take much to heart; probably, because he knows that he has a few foibles himself.
He was thought witty, thanks to his foible for relating a quantity of anecdotes on the reign of Louis XV.
The claims of Esther Dudley's gentle blood were acknowledged by all the successive Governors; and they treated her with the punctilious courtesy which it was her foible to demand, not always with success, from a neglectful world.
All the greatness of each is kept back and every foible in painful activity, as if the Olympians should meet to exchange snuff-boxes.
I think this is a foible, and a disadvantage, but I do not deny it.
Rosa looked at him with gentle compassion; she felt that what she wished was beyond the power of this man, and that he must be taken as he was, with his little foible.
My foible was patriotism; I was ruined by the baneful habit of trying to serve my country.
After all, though statistics are the childish foible of modern statesmen, who think that figures are estimates, we must cipher to estimate.
No foible is too trifling for Chaucer's quiet observation; while if he does not choose to denounce the hypocrisy of the Pardoner and the worldliness of the Monk, he has made their weaknesses sources of amusement (and indeed object-lessons as well) for all the coming generations.
said Ellen, turning away from her fruitless examination, with a sudden lighting of her sprightly blue eyes, that showed she knew how to play with the foible of her learned companion.
Now that was tact, for two of the ruling foibles of the masculine mind were touched.
Fortunately for those who pay their court through such foibles, a fond mother, though, in pursuit of praise for her children, the most rapacious of human beings, is likewise the most credulous; her demands are exorbitant; but she will swallow any thing; and the excessive affection and endurance of the Miss Steeles towards her offspring were viewed therefore by Lady Middleton without the smallest surprise or distrust.