foible


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foi·ble

 (foi′bəl)
n.
1. A minor weakness or failing of character.
2. The weaker section of a sword blade, from the middle to the tip.

[Obsolete French foible, weak point of a sword, weak, from Old French feble, weak; see feeble.]

foible

(ˈfɔɪbəl)
n
1. a slight peculiarity or minor weakness; idiosyncrasy
2. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) the most vulnerable part of a sword's blade, from the middle to the tip. Compare forte12
[C17: from obsolete French, from obsolete adj: feeble]

foi•ble

(ˈfɔɪ bəl)

n.
1. a minor weakness or failing of character.
2. a quirk or eccentricity of character.
3. the part of a sword or foil blade between the middle and the point, less strong than the forte.
[1640–50; < French, variant of faible feeble]
syn: See fault.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.foible - a behavioral attribute that is distinctive and peculiar to an individualfoible - a behavioral attribute that is distinctive and peculiar to an individual
2.foible - the weaker part of a sword's blade from the forte to the tip
part, portion - something less than the whole of a human artifact; "the rear part of the house"; "glue the two parts together"
sword, steel, blade, brand - a cutting or thrusting weapon that has a long metal blade and a hilt with a hand guard

foible

foible

noun
An imperfection of character:
Translations

foible

[ˈfɔɪbl] Nmanía f

foible

[ˈfɔɪbəl] ntravers m

foible

nEigenheit f

foible

[ˈfɔɪbl] ndebolezza, mania
References in classic literature ?
My foible was patriotism; I was ruined by the baneful habit of trying to serve my country.
But this is a harmless little foible in the English whale-hunters, which the Nantucketer does not take much to heart; probably, because he knows that he has a few foibles himself.
I think this is a foible, and a disadvantage, but I do not deny it.
Rosa sighed, yet without any bitter feeling, but rather like a woman who begins to understand a foible, and to accustom herself to it.
He was thought witty, thanks to his foible for relating a quantity of anecdotes on the reign of Louis XV.
His foibles - faults if you like - will never be dwelt upon in any memorandum of mine," he declares, and goes on - "he whose splendid and matchless achievements will be remembered with admiration while there is gratitude in the hearts of Britons, or while a ship floats upon the ocean; he whose example on the breaking out of the war gave so chivalrous an impulse to the younger men of the service that all rushed into rivalry of daring which disdained every warning of prudence, and led to acts of heroic enterprise which tended greatly to exalt the glory of our nation.
The foibles and vices of men, in whom there is great mixture of good, become more glaring objects from the virtues which contrast them and shew their deformity; and when we find such vices attended with their evil consequence to our favourite characters, we are not only taught to shun them for our own sake, but to hate them for the mischiefs they have already brought on those we love.
All the rest was weakness--sheer weakness; and it is the unhappy lot of thoroughly weak men, that their very sympathies, affections, confidences--all the qualities which in better constituted minds are virtues--dwindle into foibles, or turn into downright vices.
My dear Louisa, then consent to receive the submissive representation of your devoted friend, who knows something of several varieties of his excellent fellow-creatures - for excellent they are, I am quite ready to believe, in spite of such little foibles as always helping themselves to what they can get hold of.
My new acquaintances, both male and female, disappointed my expectations, and vexed and depressed me by turns; I for I soon grew tired of studying their peculiarities, and laughing at their foibles - particularly as I was obliged to keep my criticisms to myself, for my aunt would not hear them - and they - the ladies especially - appeared so provokingly mindless, and heartless, and artificial.
At times I wondered what she meant by giving herself such trouble to win me, when the more profitable Pelet was already in her nets, and when, too, she was aware that I possessed her secret, for I had not scrupled to tell her as much: but the fact is that as it was her nature to doubt the reality and under-value the worth of modesty, affection, disinterestedness--to regard these qualities as foibles of character--so it was equally her tendency to consider pride, hardness, selfishness, as proofs of strength.
The death of Marmaduke’s father, and the consequent division of his small estate, rendered such an offer extremely acceptable to the young Pennsylvanian; he felt his own powers, and saw, not only the excellences, but the foibles in the character of his friend.