fold


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fold1
top: isocline fold
center: overturned fold
bottom: recumbent fold

fold 1

 (fōld)
v. fold·ed, fold·ing, folds
v.tr.
1. To bend over or double up so that one part lies on another part: fold a sheet of paper.
2. To make compact by doubling or bending over parts: folded the laundry; folded the chairs for stacking.
3. To bring from an extended to a closed position: The hawk folded its wings.
4. To bring from a compact to an extended position; unfold: folded the ironing board down from the wall; folded out the map to see where we were.
5. To place together and intertwine: fold one's arms.
6. To envelop or clasp; enfold: folded his children to his breast; folded the check into the letter.
7. To blend (a light ingredient) into a heavier mixture with a series of gentle turns: folded the beaten egg whites into the batter.
8.
a. Informal To discontinue operating; close: They had to fold the company a year after they started it.
b. Games To withdraw (one's hand) in defeat, as by laying cards face down on a table.
9. Geology To form bends in (a stratum of rock).
v.intr.
1.
a. To become folded.
b. To be capable of being folded: a bed that folds for easy storage.
2. Informal To close, especially for lack of financial success; fail.
3. Games To withdraw from a game in defeat.
4. Informal
a. To give in; buckle: a team that never folded under pressure.
b. To weaken or collapse from exertion.
n.
1. The act or an instance of folding.
2. A part that has been folded over or against another: the loose folds of the drapery; clothes stacked in neat folds.
3. A line or mark made by folding; a crease: tore the paper carefully along the fold; a headline that appeared above the fold.
4. A coil or bend, as of rope.
5. Chiefly British A hill or dale in undulating country.
6. Geology A bend in a stratum of rock.
7. Anatomy A crease or ridge apparently formed by folding, as of a membrane; a plica.

[Middle English folden, from Old English fealdan, faldan; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]

fold′a·ble adj.

fold 2

 (fōld)
n.
1. A fenced enclosure for livestock, especially sheep.
2. A flock of sheep.
3.
a. A group of people or institutions bound together by common beliefs and aims.
b. A religious congregation: The priest welcomed new parishioners into the fold.
tr.v. fold·ed, fold·ing, folds
To place or keep (sheep, for example) in a fenced enclosure.

[Middle English, from Old English fald.]

fold

(fəʊld)
vb
1. to bend or be bent double so that one part covers another: to fold a sheet of paper.
2. (tr) to bring together and intertwine (the arms, legs, etc): she folded her hands.
3. (tr) (of birds, insects, etc) to close (the wings) together from an extended position
4. (tr; often foll by up or in) to enclose in or as if in a surrounding material
5. (foll by: in) to clasp (a person) in the arms
6. (usually foll by: round, about, etc) to wind (around); entwine
7. (tr) poetic to cover completely: night folded the earth.
8. (Cookery) (tr) Also: fold in to mix (a whisked mixture) with other ingredients by gently turning one part over the other with a spoon
9. (Geological Science) to produce a bend (in stratified rock) or (of stratified rock) to display a bend
10. informal (often foll by: up) to collapse; fail: the business folded.
n
11. a piece or section that has been folded: a fold of cloth.
12. a mark, crease, or hollow made by folding
13. (Physical Geography) a hollow in undulating terrain
14. (Geological Science) a bend in stratified rocks that results from movements within the earth's crust and produces such structures as anticlines and synclines
15. (Anatomy) anatomy another word for plica1
16. a coil, as in a rope, etc
17. an act of folding
[Old English fealdan; related to Old Norse falda , Old High German faldan, Latin duplus double, Greek haploos simple]
ˈfoldable adj

fold

(fəʊld)
n
1. (Agriculture)
a. a small enclosure or pen for sheep or other livestock, where they can be gathered
b. the sheep or other livestock gathered in such an enclosure
c. a flock of sheep
d. a herd of Highland cattle
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a church or the members of it
3. any group or community sharing a way of life or holding the same values
vb
(Agriculture) (tr) to gather or confine (sheep or other livestock) in a fold
[Old English falod; related to Old Saxon faled, Middle Dutch vaelt]

fold1

(foʊld)

v.t.
1. to bend (cloth, paper, etc.) over upon itself.
2. to bring into a compact form by bending and laying parts together: to fold up a map.
3. to bring together and intertwine or cross: He folded his arms on his chest.
4. to bend or wind; entwine: The child folded his arms around my neck.
5. to bring (the wings) close to the body, as a bird on alighting.
6. to enclose; wrap; envelop: to fold something in paper.
7. to embrace or clasp; enfold: to fold someone in one's arms.
8. to place (one's cards) facedown so as to withdraw from the play.
9. Informal. to bring to an end; close up: to fold a business.
v.i.
10. to be folded or be capable of folding.
11. to place one's cards facedown so as to withdraw from the play.
12.
a. to fail, esp. to go out of business: The magazine folded after a few years.
b. to end a run; close: The show will fold next week.
13. fold in, to blend (a cooking ingredient) into a mixture by gently turning one part over another: Fold in the egg whites.
14. fold out or down, to spread or open up; unfold.
n.
15. a part that is folded; pleat; layer: folds of cloth.
16. a line, crease, or hollow made by folding.
17. a hollow place in undulating ground.
18. a portion of rock strata that is folded or bent, as an anticline or syncline, or that connects horizontal strata, as a monocline.
19. a coil of a serpent, string, etc.
20. the act of folding or doubling over.
21. a margin or ridge formed by the folding of a membrane or other flat body part; plica.
[before 900; Middle English folden, falden, Old English fealdon]
fold′a•ble, adj.

fold2

(foʊld)

n.
1. an enclosure for sheep.
2. the sheep kept within it.
3. a flock of sheep.
4. a church or its members.
5. a group sharing common beliefs, values, etc.: to rejoin the fold.
v.t.
6. to confine (sheep or other domestic animals) in a fold.
[before 900; Middle English fold, fald, Old English fald, falod]

-fold

a combining form meaning “having the number of kinds or parts” or “multiplied the number of times” specified by the initial element: fourfold; manyfold.
[Middle English; Old English -fald, -feald, c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon -fald, Old High German -falt, Old Norse -faldr, Gothic -falths, all representing the Germanic base of fold1; akin to Greek -ploos, -plous (see diplo-), Latin -plus (see double), -plex -plex]

fold

(fōld)
A bend in a layer or in several layers of rock. Folds occur in rocks when they are compressed by plate-tectonic forces.

Fold

 a flock enclosed within a fence or shelter; a congregation or group of Christians.
Examples: fold of Christ, 1541; of sheep, 1697.

fold


Past participle: folded
Gerund: folding

Imperative
fold
fold
Present
I fold
you fold
he/she/it folds
we fold
you fold
they fold
Preterite
I folded
you folded
he/she/it folded
we folded
you folded
they folded
Present Continuous
I am folding
you are folding
he/she/it is folding
we are folding
you are folding
they are folding
Present Perfect
I have folded
you have folded
he/she/it has folded
we have folded
you have folded
they have folded
Past Continuous
I was folding
you were folding
he/she/it was folding
we were folding
you were folding
they were folding
Past Perfect
I had folded
you had folded
he/she/it had folded
we had folded
you had folded
they had folded
Future
I will fold
you will fold
he/she/it will fold
we will fold
you will fold
they will fold
Future Perfect
I will have folded
you will have folded
he/she/it will have folded
we will have folded
you will have folded
they will have folded
Future Continuous
I will be folding
you will be folding
he/she/it will be folding
we will be folding
you will be folding
they will be folding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been folding
you have been folding
he/she/it has been folding
we have been folding
you have been folding
they have been folding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been folding
you will have been folding
he/she/it will have been folding
we will have been folding
you will have been folding
they will have been folding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been folding
you had been folding
he/she/it had been folding
we had been folding
you had been folding
they had been folding
Conditional
I would fold
you would fold
he/she/it would fold
we would fold
you would fold
they would fold
Past Conditional
I would have folded
you would have folded
he/she/it would have folded
we would have folded
you would have folded
they would have folded

fold


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1. A bend in rock layers, formed when pressure has made them plastic.
2. To combine one ingredient or mixture with another by turning them gently with a spatula or metal spoon.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fold - an angular or rounded shape made by foldingfold - an angular or rounded shape made by folding; "a fold in the napkin"; "a crease in his trousers"; "a plication on her blouse"; "a flexure of the colon"; "a bend of his elbow"
pleat, plait - any of various types of fold formed by doubling fabric back upon itself and then pressing or stitching into shape
angular shape, angularity - a shape having one or more sharp angles
twirl, kink, twist - a sharp bend in a line produced when a line having a loop is pulled tight
pucker, ruck - an irregular fold in an otherwise even surface (as in cloth)
2.fold - a group of people who adhere to a common faith and habitually attend a given churchfold - a group of people who adhere to a common faith and habitually attend a given church
social group - people sharing some social relation
flock - a church congregation guided by a pastor
denomination - a group of religious congregations having its own organization and a distinctive faith
3.fold - a geological process that causes a bend in a stratum of rock
geologic process, geological process - (geology) a natural process whereby geological features are modified
4.fold - a group of sheep or goats
sheep - woolly usually horned ruminant mammal related to the goat
animal group - a group of animals
5.fold - a folded part (as in skin or muscle)
anatomical structure, bodily structure, body structure, complex body part, structure - a particular complex anatomical part of a living thing; "he has good bone structure"
epicanthic fold, epicanthus - a vertical fold of skin over the nasal canthus; normal for Mongolian peoples; sometimes occurs in Down's syndrome
plica vocalis, vocal band, vocal cord, vocal fold - either of two pairs of folds of mucous membrane projecting into the larynx
ruga - (anatomy) a fold or wrinkle or crease; "rugae of the stomach"
tentorium - (anatomy) a fold of dura mater that covers the cerebellum and supports the occipital lobes of the cerebrum
6.fold - a pen for sheepfold - a pen for sheep      
pen - an enclosure for confining livestock
7.fold - the act of folding; "he gave the napkins a double fold"
change of shape - an action that changes the shape of something
pleating, plication - the act of folding in parallel folds
Verb1.fold - bend or lay so that one part covers the otherfold - bend or lay so that one part covers the other; "fold up the newspaper"; "turn up your collar"
change surface - undergo or cause to undergo a change in the surface
plicate, pleat - fold into pleats, "Pleat the cloth"
crease, furrow, wrinkle - make wrinkled or creased; "furrow one's brow"
crease, crinkle, crisp, ruckle, scrunch up, wrinkle, scrunch - make wrinkles or creases on a smooth surface; make a pressed, folded or wrinkled line in; "The dress got wrinkled"; "crease the paper like this to make a crane"
corrugate - fold into ridges; "corrugate iron"
pleat, ruffle - pleat or gather into a ruffle; "ruffle the curtain fabric"
tuck - make a tuck or several folds in; "tuck the fabric"; "tuck in the sheet"
crimp, pinch - make ridges into by pinching together
cross - fold so as to resemble a cross; "she crossed her legs"
collapse - fold or close up; "fold up your umbrella"; "collapse the music stand"
spread, unfold, open, spread out - spread out or open from a closed or folded state; "open the map"; "spread your arms"
2.fold - incorporate a food ingredient into a mixture by repeatedly turning it over without stirring or beating; "Fold the egg whites into the batter"
incorporate, integrate - make into a whole or make part of a whole; "She incorporated his suggestions into her proposal"
3.fold - cease to operate or cause to cease operating; "The owners decided to move and to close the factory"; "My business closes every night at 8 P.M."; "close up the shop"
adjourn, retire, withdraw - break from a meeting or gathering; "We adjourned for lunch"; "The men retired to the library"
4.fold - confine in a fold, like sheep
restrain, confine, hold - to close within bounds, limit or hold back from movement; "This holds the local until the express passengers change trains"; "About a dozen animals were held inside the stockade"; "The illegal immigrants were held at a detention center"; "The terrorists held the journalists for ransom"
5.fold - become folded or folded up; "The bed folds in a jiffy"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
crinkle, rumple, wrinkle, crumple, crease - become wrinkled or crumpled or creased; "This fabric won't wrinkle"

fold

verb
1. bend, double, gather, tuck, overlap, crease, pleat, intertwine, double over, turn under He folded the paper carefully.
2. (Informal) go bankrupt, close, fail, crash, collapse, founder, shut down, go under, be ruined, go bust (informal), go to the wall, go belly-up (slang) The company folded in 1990.
3. wrap, envelop, entwine, enfold He folded her in his arms.
4. wrap up, wrap, enclose, envelop, do up, enfold an object folded neatly in tissue-paper
noun
1. crease, turn, gather, bend, layer, overlap, wrinkle, pleat, ruffle, furrow, knife-edge, double thickness, folded portion Make another fold and turn the ends together.
fold something in stir gently, introduce, envelop, mix gently Fold in the whipped egg whites and cream.

fold

verb
1. To bend together or make a crease in so that one part lies over another:
2. Informal. To undergo sudden financial failure:
Idioms: go belly up, go bust, go on the rocks, go to the wall.
3. Informal. To give in from or as if from a gradual loss of strength:
4. Informal. To give way mentally and emotionally:
Informal: crack up.
noun
A line or an arrangement made by the doubling of one part over another:
Translations
حَظيرَه، زَريبَهطَيّطَيَّة أو ثَنْيَه في الورقَهطَيَّه، ثَنْيَهيَضَعُ شَيْئا فوق الآخَر
přeložitohybovčinecpřeloženísklad
foldfoldefolderlægge over korslægge sammen
taitostaittaakaatuakarsinalopettaa
prekloppreklopiti
brjóta samanbrotfelling, brotfjárrétt, kvíarleggja saman
囲い折りたたむ
...을 접다접은 자리
plicare
aploksielocelocījumssaglaustsakrustot
ovčiareňvyhnutý roh
gubapreganitisklopitizgib
veckvikafålla
พับรอยพับ
gấpnếp gấp

fold

1 [fəʊld] N (Agr) → redil m
to return to the fold (Rel) → volver al redil

fold

2 [fəʊld]
A. N (in paper etc) → pliegue m, doblez m (Geol) → pliegue m
B. VT [+ paper, map, sheet, blanket] → doblar; (esp several times) → plegar; [+ wings] → recoger
she folded the newspaper in twodobló en dos el periódico
to fold a piece of paper in halfdoblar un trozo de papel por la mitad
to fold one's armscruzar los brazos
to fold sb in one's armsabrazar a algn tiernamente, estrechar a algn contra el pecho
C. VI
1. (lit) [chair, table] → plegarse, doblarse
2. (= fail) [business venture] → fracasar, quebrar; [play] → fracasar
fold away
A. VI + ADV [table, bed] → plegarse
B. VT + ADV [+ clothes, newspaper] → doblar (para guardar); [+ bed] → plegar
fold back VT + ADVdoblar hacia abajo, plegar
fold down
A. VT + ADV = fold back
B. VI + ADV it folds down at nightde noche se dobla hacia abajo
fold in VT + ADV (Culin) [+ flour, sugar] → mezclar
fold over VT + ADV [+ paper] → plegar; [+ blanket] → hacer el embozo con
fold up
A. VI + ADV
1. (lit) → doblarse, plegarse
to fold up (with laughter)troncharse de risa
2. (= fail) [business venture] → quebrar, fracasar
B. VT + ADV [+ paper, map, sheet, blanket] → doblar; [+ chair] → plegar
she folded the chair up and walked offplegó la silla y se marchó

fold

[ˈfəʊld]
n
(= bend, crease) → pli m
[dress, skirt] → pli m
(also sheepfold) → parc m à moutons
(= group) to return to the fold → revenir dans son giron
vt
[+ paper, fabric] → plier
He folded the newspaper in half → Il a plié le journal en deux.
to fold one's arms → croiser les bras
She folded her arms → Elle a croisé les bras.
to fold one's hands → joindre les mains
vi
(= collapse) [business] → faire faillite
[table, chair, bed] → se plier
to fold flat → se replier
fold back
vt [+ sheet] → rabattre
fold in
vt [+ egg white, flour] → incorporer
to fold sth into a mixture → incorporer qch à un mélange
fold over
vtrabattre
vise rabattre
fold up
vi
[map] → se plier, se replier; [ironing board, table] → se replier
vt
[+ map] → plier

fold

1
nFalte f; (Geol, of the earth) → (Boden)falte f; folds of skinHautfalten pl; folds of fatFettwülste pl
vt
(= bend into folds) paper(zusammen)falten; blanketzusammenlegen or -falten; to fold a newspaper in two/foureine Zeitung falten/zweimal falten; to fold something flatetw flach zusammenfalten
to fold one’s armsdie Arme verschränken; she folded her hands in her lapsie faltete die Hände im Schoß zusammen
(= wrap up)einwickeln, einschlagen (→ in in +acc); he folded the book in some paperer schlug das Buch in Papier ein
to fold somebody in one’s armsjdn in die Arme schließen
vi
(chair, table)sich zusammenklappen lassen; (accidentally) → zusammenklappen
(= close down: business) → eingehen

fold

2
n (= pen)Pferch m; to return to the fold (fig)in den Schoß der Gemeinde zurückkehren

fold

1 [fəʊld] n (Agr) → ovile m
to come back to the fold (fig) → tornare all'ovile

fold

2 [fəʊld]
1. n (bend, crease) (also Geol) → piega
2. vt (gen) → piegare; (wings) → ripiegare
she folded the paper in two → piegò in due la carta
to fold one's arms → incrociare le braccia
3. vi (chair, table) → piegarsi (fam) (fail, business venture) → crollare; (play) → chiudere
fold away
1. vi + adv (table, bed) → piegarsi, essere pieghevole
2. vt + adv (clothes, linen) → piegare, mettere a posto
fold back vt + advripiegare
fold over vt + advripiegare
fold up
1. vi + adv (fam) (fail, business) → fallire, crollare
2. vt + adv (map, paper) → piegare, ripiegare

fold1

(fould) verb
1. to double over (material, paper etc). She folded the paper in half.
2. to lay one on top of another. She folded her hands in her lap.
3. to bring in (wings) close to the body. The bird folded its wings.
noun
1. a doubling of one layer of material, paper etc over another. Her dress hung in folds.
2. a mark made especially on paper etc by doing this; a crease. There was a fold in the page.
ˈfolded adjective
ˈfolder noun
a cover for keeping loose papers together. He kept the notes for his speech in a folder.
ˈfolding adjective
that can be folded. a folding chair.

fold2

(fould) noun
a place surrounded by a fence or wall, in which sheep are kept. a sheep fold.

fold

طَيّ, يَطْوي ohyb, přeložit fold, folde Falte, falten διπλώνω, πτυχή plegar, pliegue taitos, taittaa pli, plier preklop, preklopiti piega, piegare 囲い, 折りたたむ ...을 접다, 접은 자리 vouw, vouwen brettekant, folde fałda, złożyć dobra, dobrar складка, складывать veck, vika พับ, รอยพับ kat, katlamak gấp, nếp gấp 折叠, 折痕

fold

n. pliegue de un margen;
aryepiglottic ______ ariepiglótico;
gastric ______ gástrico;
gluteal ______ glúteo.

fold

n pliegue m; nail — pliegue ungueal; skin — pliegue cutáneo; vt to — one’s arms cruzar los brazos; Fold your arms while I listen to your lungs..Cruce los brazos mientras le escucho los pulmones.
References in classic literature ?
Mother, are you angry when you fold your lips tight together and go out of the room sometimes, when Aunt March scolds or people worry you?
Il est necessaire d'etre vigilant, mon enfant," the other observed, dropping a fold of his cloak, and looking the soldier close in the face as he passed him, still continuing his way toward the British fortification.
Carefully she rubbed and ironed every fold and every hem, with the most scrupulous exactness, every now and then raising her hand to her face to wipe off the tears that were coursing down her cheeks.
From that moment the sheep had begun to gather to the fold -- that is to say, the camps -- and offer their valueless lives and their valuable wool to the "righteous cause.
It is time for him to get out of Switzerland, then, for as soon as he has discovered the cause, the misery is magnified several fold.
At this time, I was very active in explaining every dif- ficulty, removing every doubt, dispelling every fear, and inspiring all with the firmness indispensable to success in our undertaking; assuring them that half was gained the instant we made the move; we had talked long enough; we were now ready to move; if not now, we never should be; and if we did not intend to move now, we had as well fold our arms, sit down, and acknowledge ourselves fit only to be slaves.
Bates, and appearing to attend to the good old lady's replies, she saw her with a sort of anxious parade of mystery fold up a letter which she had apparently been reading aloud to Miss Fairfax, and return it into the purple and gold reticule by her side, saying, with significant nods,
Helen Burns, if you don't go and put your drawer in order, and fold up your work this minute, I'll tell Miss Scatcherd to come and look at it
They'll be covered if left in the fold all night: and put a plank before them,' said Heathcliff.
He was still fingering the fold of her wrapper, but he began to look a little more as if he believed in her reality.
It was silently acquiesced in, and they passed her over the seats in the hall to a raised place, where he, by leaning over the dock, could fold her in his arms.
It was cold still weather; and not a hair of her head, nor a fold of her dress, was stirred, as she looked intently at me, holding up her child.