folded


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Related to folded: folded into
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fold1
top: isocline fold
center: overturned fold
bottom: recumbent fold

fold 1

 (fōld)
v. fold·ed, fold·ing, folds
v.tr.
1. To bend over or double up so that one part lies on another part: fold a sheet of paper.
2. To make compact by doubling or bending over parts: folded the laundry; folded the chairs for stacking.
3. To bring from an extended to a closed position: The hawk folded its wings.
4. To bring from a compact to an extended position; unfold: folded the ironing board down from the wall; folded out the map to see where we were.
5. To place together and intertwine: fold one's arms.
6. To envelop or clasp; enfold: folded his children to his breast; folded the check into the letter.
7. To blend (a light ingredient) into a heavier mixture with a series of gentle turns: folded the beaten egg whites into the batter.
8.
a. Informal To discontinue operating; close: They had to fold the company a year after they started it.
b. Games To withdraw (one's hand) in defeat, as by laying cards face down on a table.
9. Geology To form bends in (a stratum of rock).
v.intr.
1.
a. To become folded.
b. To be capable of being folded: a bed that folds for easy storage.
2. Informal To close, especially for lack of financial success; fail.
3. Games To withdraw from a game in defeat.
4. Informal
a. To give in; buckle: a team that never folded under pressure.
b. To weaken or collapse from exertion.
n.
1. The act or an instance of folding.
2. A part that has been folded over or against another: the loose folds of the drapery; clothes stacked in neat folds.
3. A line or mark made by folding; a crease: tore the paper carefully along the fold; a headline that appeared above the fold.
4. A coil or bend, as of rope.
5. Chiefly British A hill or dale in undulating country.
6. Geology A bend in a stratum of rock.
7. Anatomy A crease or ridge apparently formed by folding, as of a membrane; a plica.

[Middle English folden, from Old English fealdan, faldan; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]

fold′a·ble adj.

fold 2

 (fōld)
n.
1. A fenced enclosure for livestock, especially sheep.
2. A flock of sheep.
3.
a. A group of people or institutions bound together by common beliefs and aims.
b. A religious congregation: The priest welcomed new parishioners into the fold.
tr.v. fold·ed, fold·ing, folds
To place or keep (sheep, for example) in a fenced enclosure.

[Middle English, from Old English fald.]
Translations
مَطْوي
složený
foldet
redős
samanlagîur, brotinn
katlanmış

folded

adj
paper(zusammen)gefaltet; clothes, blanket, towel(zusammen)gefaltet, zusammengelegt; petal, leafgeschlossen; folded into a rectanglezu einem Rechteck gefaltet
(= crossed) handsgefaltet; armsverschränkt; to stand with one’s arms foldedmit verschränkten Armen dastehen

folded

[ˈfəʊldɪd] adj (paper) → piegato/a; (closed) → chiuso/a

fold1

(fould) verb
1. to double over (material, paper etc). She folded the paper in half.
2. to lay one on top of another. She folded her hands in her lap.
3. to bring in (wings) close to the body. The bird folded its wings.
noun
1. a doubling of one layer of material, paper etc over another. Her dress hung in folds.
2. a mark made especially on paper etc by doing this; a crease. There was a fold in the page.
ˈfolded adjective
ˈfolder noun
a cover for keeping loose papers together. He kept the notes for his speech in a folder.
ˈfolding adjective
that can be folded. a folding chair.
References in classic literature ?
So beautiful she was that the flowers about her feet folded their petals in despair and bent their heads in token of submission; so sweet her look that the humming birds thronged her eyes, thrusting their thirsty bills almost into them, and the wild bees were about her lips.
Thus went Violet through the clear air, and the earth looked smiling up to her, as, with the bright wreath folded in her arms, she flew among the soft, white clouds.
With a beating heart Violet folded her fading wreath more closely to her breast, and with weary wings flew onward to the dreary palace.
On a throne hung with clouds sat the Frost-King; a crown of crystals bound his white locks, and a dark mantle wrought with delicate frost-work was folded over his cold breast.
You shall live in peace, and spin your delicate threads into a mantle for the stern King; and I will weave golden threads amid the gray, that when folded over his cold heart gentle thoughts may enter in and make it their home.
And when he turned from the brightness without, to his stately palace, it seemcd so cold and dreary, that he folded Violet's mantle round him, and sat beneath the faded wreath upon his ice-carved throne, wondering at the strange warmth that came from it; till at length he bade his Spirits bring the little Fairy from her dismal prison.
gasped Ojo, in amazement, and listening carefully he thought he could hear the muffled screams of Scraps coming from the center of the folded leaf.
I shall grow old and quiet and sad like poor Aunt Tavie," she murmured to herself as she folded the letter and replaced it in the secretary.
The young girl obediently yielded to her old companion's wish and unpinning the cumbersome, sombre drapery from her bonnet, folded it neatly and laid it upon the seat in front of her.
And try letting yourself be carried away by your feelings, blindly, without reflection, without a primary cause, repelling consciousness at least for a time; hate or love, if only not to sit with your hands folded.
With these words, Mr Tappertit, who seemed to expect no reply, and to hold it as a necessary consequence of his eloquence that his hearer should be utterly stunned, dumbfoundered, and overwhelmed, folded his arms so that the palm of each hand rested on the opposite shoulder, and disappeared after the manner of those mysterious warners of whom he had read in cheap story-books.
Her own future was close-folded still; folded and hidden in beautiful mists; but she leaned her head against the sun-warmed door, and closing her eyes, whispered, just as if she had been a child saying her prayers: "God bless aunt Miranda; God bless the brick house that was; God bless the brick house that is to be