folded


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to folded: folded into
click for a larger image
fold1
top: isocline fold
center: overturned fold
bottom: recumbent fold

fold 1

 (fōld)
v. fold·ed, fold·ing, folds
v.tr.
1. To bend over or double up so that one part lies on another part: fold a sheet of paper.
2. To make compact by doubling or bending over parts: folded the laundry; folded the chairs for stacking.
3. To bring from an extended to a closed position: The hawk folded its wings.
4. To bring from a compact to an extended position; unfold: folded the ironing board down from the wall; folded out the map to see where we were.
5. To place together and intertwine: fold one's arms.
6. To envelop or clasp; enfold: folded his children to his breast; folded the check into the letter.
7. To blend (a light ingredient) into a heavier mixture with a series of gentle turns: folded the beaten egg whites into the batter.
8.
a. Informal To discontinue operating; close: They had to fold the company a year after they started it.
b. Games To withdraw (one's hand) in defeat, as by laying cards face down on a table.
9. Geology To form bends in (a stratum of rock).
v.intr.
1.
a. To become folded.
b. To be capable of being folded: a bed that folds for easy storage.
2. Informal To close, especially for lack of financial success; fail.
3. Games To withdraw from a game in defeat.
4. Informal
a. To give in; buckle: a team that never folded under pressure.
b. To weaken or collapse from exertion.
n.
1. The act or an instance of folding.
2. A part that has been folded over or against another: the loose folds of the drapery; clothes stacked in neat folds.
3. A line or mark made by folding; a crease: tore the paper carefully along the fold; a headline that appeared above the fold.
4. A coil or bend, as of rope.
5. Chiefly British A hill or dale in undulating country.
6. Geology A bend in a stratum of rock.
7. Anatomy A crease or ridge apparently formed by folding, as of a membrane; a plica.

[Middle English folden, from Old English fealdan, faldan; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]

fold′a·ble adj.

fold 2

 (fōld)
n.
1. A fenced enclosure for livestock, especially sheep.
2. A flock of sheep.
3.
a. A group of people or institutions bound together by common beliefs and aims.
b. A religious congregation: The priest welcomed new parishioners into the fold.
tr.v. fold·ed, fold·ing, folds
To place or keep (sheep, for example) in a fenced enclosure.

[Middle English, from Old English fald.]
Translations
مَطْوي
složený
foldet
redős
samanlagîur, brotinn
katlanmış

folded

adj
paper(zusammen)gefaltet; clothes, blanket, towel(zusammen)gefaltet, zusammengelegt; petal, leafgeschlossen; folded into a rectanglezu einem Rechteck gefaltet
(= crossed) handsgefaltet; armsverschränkt; to stand with one’s arms foldedmit verschränkten Armen dastehen

folded

[ˈfəʊldɪd] adj (paper) → piegato/a; (closed) → chiuso/a

fold1

(fould) verb
1. to double over (material, paper etc). She folded the paper in half.
2. to lay one on top of another. She folded her hands in her lap.
3. to bring in (wings) close to the body. The bird folded its wings.
noun
1. a doubling of one layer of material, paper etc over another. Her dress hung in folds.
2. a mark made especially on paper etc by doing this; a crease. There was a fold in the page.
ˈfolded adjective
ˈfolder noun
a cover for keeping loose papers together. He kept the notes for his speech in a folder.
ˈfolding adjective
that can be folded. a folding chair.
References in classic literature ?
Beth trotted to and fro between parlor kitchen, quiet and busy, while Amy gave directions to everyone, as she sat with her hands folded.
He'd took off that silk neckcloth he always wore, and folded it smooth and stuck his pin through it.
Pontellier folded the letter it was time for her to dress for the early dinner.
Cora folded Alice to her bosom in agony, and Duncan sprang to his feet.
But now her spirit resembled, in its potency, a minute quantity of ottar of rose in one of Hepzibah's huge, iron-bound trunks, diffusing its fragrance through the various articles of linen and wrought-lace, kerchiefs, caps, stockings, folded dresses, gloves, and whatever else was treasured there.
If they had been at all visibly blighted or battered, she would doubtless have grown, on tracing it back, haggard enough to match them; as matters stood, however, I could feel her, when she surveyed them, with her large white arms folded and the habit of serenity in all her look, thank the Lord's mercy that if they were ruined the pieces would still serve.
He paused a little; then kneeling in the pulpit's bows, folded his large brown hands across his chest, uplifted his closed eyes, and offered a prayer so deeply devout that he seemed kneeling and praying at the bottom of the sea.
Drawing across her bow, he perceived that in accordance with the fanciful French taste, the upper part of her stem-piece was carved in the likeness of a huge drooping stalk, was painted green, and for thorns had copper spikes projecting from it here and there; the whole terminating in a symmetrical folded bulb of a bright red color.
The friend, who was named Tamoszius Kuszleika, was a sharp little man who folded hides on the killing beds, and he listened to what Jurgis had to say without seeming at all surprised.
And the trader leaned back in his chair, and folded his arm, with an air of virtuous decision, apparently considering himself a second Wilberforce.
Her own future was close-folded still; folded and hidden in beautiful mists; but she leaned her head against the sun-warmed door, and closing her eyes, whispered, just as if she had been a child saying her prayers: "God bless aunt Miranda; God bless the brick house that was; God bless the brick house that is to be
My gifted townsman stood gloomily apart, with folded arms, and I could have wished that his curls and forehead had been more probable.