folding


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fold1
top: isocline fold
center: overturned fold
bottom: recumbent fold

fold 1

 (fōld)
v. fold·ed, fold·ing, folds
v.tr.
1. To bend over or double up so that one part lies on another part: fold a sheet of paper.
2. To make compact by doubling or bending over parts: folded the laundry; folded the chairs for stacking.
3. To bring from an extended to a closed position: The hawk folded its wings.
4. To bring from a compact to an extended position; unfold: folded the ironing board down from the wall; folded out the map to see where we were.
5. To place together and intertwine: fold one's arms.
6. To envelop or clasp; enfold: folded his children to his breast; folded the check into the letter.
7. To blend (a light ingredient) into a heavier mixture with a series of gentle turns: folded the beaten egg whites into the batter.
8.
a. Informal To discontinue operating; close: They had to fold the company a year after they started it.
b. Games To withdraw (one's hand) in defeat, as by laying cards face down on a table.
9. Geology To form bends in (a stratum of rock).
v.intr.
1.
a. To become folded.
b. To be capable of being folded: a bed that folds for easy storage.
2. Informal To close, especially for lack of financial success; fail.
3. Games To withdraw from a game in defeat.
4. Informal
a. To give in; buckle: a team that never folded under pressure.
b. To weaken or collapse from exertion.
n.
1. The act or an instance of folding.
2. A part that has been folded over or against another: the loose folds of the drapery; clothes stacked in neat folds.
3. A line or mark made by folding; a crease: tore the paper carefully along the fold; a headline that appeared above the fold.
4. A coil or bend, as of rope.
5. Chiefly British A hill or dale in undulating country.
6. Geology A bend in a stratum of rock.
7. Anatomy A crease or ridge apparently formed by folding, as of a membrane; a plica.

[Middle English folden, from Old English fealdan, faldan; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]

fold′a·ble adj.

fold 2

 (fōld)
n.
1. A fenced enclosure for livestock, especially sheep.
2. A flock of sheep.
3.
a. A group of people or institutions bound together by common beliefs and aims.
b. A religious congregation: The priest welcomed new parishioners into the fold.
tr.v. fold·ed, fold·ing, folds
To place or keep (sheep, for example) in a fenced enclosure.

[Middle English, from Old English fald.]

folding

(ˈfəʊldɪŋ)
adj
able to be folded
n
(Geological Science) geology bends in stratified rocks that result from movements within the earth's crust and produce such structures as anticlines and synclines
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.folding - the process whereby a protein molecule assumes its intricate three-dimensional shape; "understanding protein folding is the next step in deciphering the genetic code"
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
2.folding - a geological process that causes a bend in a stratum of rock
geologic process, geological process - (geology) a natural process whereby geological features are modified
3.folding - the act of folding; "he gave the napkins a double fold"
change of shape - an action that changes the shape of something
pleating, plication - the act of folding in parallel folds
Adj.1.folding - capable of being folded up and stored; "a foldaway bed"
collapsable, collapsible - capable of collapsing or being collapsed; "a collapsible boat"
Translations
قابِلٌ للطَّيقَابِلٌ لِلطَيّ
skládací
folde-sammenklappelig
kokoonpantava
sklopiv
felli-
折りたたみの
접는
skladací
zložljiv
hopvikbar
ที่พับเก็บได้
katlanırkatlanabilir
có thể gấp được

folding

[ˈfəʊldɪŋ]
A. ADJ [seat, table, ruler] → plegable
B. CPD folding chair Nsilla f plegable or de tijera
folding doors NPLpuertas fpl de fuelle or plegadizas
folding ruler Nregla f plegable

folding

[ˈfəʊldɪŋ] adjpliant(e)
a folding chair → une chaise pliante
a folding bed → un lit pliantfold-up [ˈfəʊldʌp] adj [chair, table, bed] → pliant(e)

folding

adj attrKlapp-; folding bedKlappbett nt; folding chairKlappstuhl m; (= grille on lift)Scherengittertür f; folding tableKlapptisch m

folding

:
folding doors
plFalttür f
folding money
n (inf)Papiergeld nt
folding screen

folding

[ˈfəʊldɪŋ] adj (chair, doors, bed) → pieghevole

fold1

(fould) verb
1. to double over (material, paper etc). She folded the paper in half.
2. to lay one on top of another. She folded her hands in her lap.
3. to bring in (wings) close to the body. The bird folded its wings.
noun
1. a doubling of one layer of material, paper etc over another. Her dress hung in folds.
2. a mark made especially on paper etc by doing this; a crease. There was a fold in the page.
ˈfolded adjective
ˈfolder noun
a cover for keeping loose papers together. He kept the notes for his speech in a folder.
ˈfolding adjective
that can be folded. a folding chair.

folding

قَابِلٌ لِلطَيّ skládací sammenklappelig zusammenklappbar πτυσσόμενος plegable kokoonpantava pliant sklopiv pieghevole 折りたたみの 접는 opvouwbaar sammenfoldet składany dobrável складной hopvikbar ที่พับเก็บได้ katlanır có thể gấp được 可折叠的
References in classic literature ?
Having no top to its head, she tied on a neat little cap, and as both arms and legs were gone, she hid these deficiencies by folding it in a blanket and devoting her best bed to this chronic invalid.
Lighting a lamp, Wing Bid- dlebaum washed the few dishes soiled by his simple meal and, setting up a folding cot by the screen door that led to the porch, prepared to undress for the night.
Shaking his mantle, and folding it on his bosom, he also quitted the place, without pursuing a subject which might have proved so fatal to the individual at his elbow.
I winced at my mistake, which I attenuated as I could, and opened my letter again to repeat it to her; then, faltering in the act and folding it up once more, I put it back in my pocket.
Folding back the counterpane, I stooped over the bed.
Now there came footsteps outside, and, as he opened the door a man in livery entered, carrying a folding table, and behind him two men with covered trays.
Hastily folding and directing this, she went to a drawer and made up a little package of clothing for her boy, which she tied with a handkerchief firmly round her waist; and, so fond is a mother's remembrance, that, even in the terrors of that hour, she did not forget to put in the little package one or two of his favorite toys, reserving a gayly painted parrot to amuse him, when she should be called on to awaken him.
She showed her how to make a pretty trimming of narrow white linen tape, by folding it in pointed shapes and sewing it down very flat with neat little stitches.
Descending from her chair, she came and placed herself on my knee; then, folding her little hands demurely before her, shaking back her curls and lifting her eyes to the ceiling, she commenced singing a song from some opera.
he repeated, folding his arms, and looking mortally insulted.
Miss Pross was a pleasant sight, albeit wild, and red, and grim, taking off her darling's bonnet when she came up-stairs, and touching it up with the ends of her handkerchief, and blowing the dust off it, and folding her mantle ready for laying by, and smoothing her rich hair with as much pride as she could possibly have taken in her own hair if she had been the vainest and handsomest of women.
cried Scrooge, folding one of his bed-curtains in his arms,' they are not torn down, rings and all.