foliage


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fo·li·age

 (fō′lē-ĭj, fō′lĭj)
n.
1.
a. Plant leaves, especially tree leaves, considered as a group.
b. A cluster of leaves.
2. An ornamental representation of leaves, stems, and flowers, especially in architecture.

[Alteration (influenced by Latin folium, leaf) of Middle English foilage, from Old French foillage, from foille, leaf; see foil2.]

fo′li·aged adj.

foliage

(ˈfəʊlɪɪdʒ)
n
1. (Botany) the green leaves of a plant
2. sprays of leaves used for decoration
3. (Art Terms) an ornamental leaflike design
[C15: from Old French fuellage, from fuelle leaf; influenced in form by Latin folium]
ˈfoliaged adj

fo•li•age

(ˈfoʊ li ɪdʒ)

n.
1. the leaves of a plant, collectively; leafage.
2. leaves in general.
3. the ornamental representation of leaves, flowers, and branches, as in architecture.
[1400–50; late Middle English foilage < Middle French fueillage, foillage, derivative of feuille leaf. See foil2, -age]
fo′li•aged, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.foliage - the main organ of photosynthesis and transpiration in higher plantsfoliage - the main organ of photosynthesis and transpiration in higher plants
venation - (botany) the arrangement of veins in a leaf
cataphyll - a reduced or scarcely developed leaf at the start of a plant's life (i.e., cotyledons) or in the early stages of leaf development
floral leaf - a modified leaf that is part of a flower
dandelion green - the foliage of the dandelion plant
pitcher - (botany) a leaf that that is modified in such a way as to resemble a pitcher or ewer
plant organ - a functional and structural unit of a plant or fungus
sporophyl, sporophyll - leaf in ferns and mosses that bears the sporangia
parenchyma - the primary tissue of higher plants composed of thin-walled cells that remain capable of cell division even when mature; constitutes the greater part of leaves, roots, the pulp of fruits, and the pith of stems
blade, leaf blade - especially a leaf of grass or the broad portion of a leaf as distinct from the petiole
amplexicaul leaf - a leaf with its base clasping the stem
greenery, verdure - green foliage
leaflet - part of a compound leaf
frond - compound leaf of a fern or palm or cycad
pad - the large floating leaf of an aquatic plant (as the water lily)
scale leaf, scale - a specialized leaf or bract that protects a bud or catkin
fig leaf - a leaf from a fig tree
simple leaf - a leaf that is not divided into parts
compound leaf - a leaf composed of a number of leaflets on a common stalk
entire leaf - a leaf having a smooth margin without notches or indentations
crenate leaf - a leaf having a scalloped margin
serrate leaf - a leaf having a margin notched like a saw with teeth pointing toward the apex
dentate leaf - a leaf having a toothed margin
emarginate leaf - a leaf having a notch at the apex
erose leaf - a leaf having a jagged margin as though gnawed
runcinate leaf - a leaf having incised margins with the lobes or teeth curved toward the base; as a dandelion leaf
lobed leaf - a leaf having deeply indented margins
lobe - (botany) a part into which a leaf is divided
parallel-veined leaf - a leaf whose veins run in parallel from the stem
parted leaf - a leaf having margins incised almost to the base so as to create distinct divisions or lobes
prickly-edged leaf - a leaf having prickly margins
rosette - a cluster of leaves growing in crowded circles from a common center or crown (usually at or close to the ground)
leaf form, leaf shape - any of the various shape that leaves of plants can assume
2.foliage - (architecture) leaf-like architectural ornament
architectural ornament - (architecture) something added to a building to improve its appearance
architecture - the discipline dealing with the principles of design and construction and ornamentation of fine buildings; "architecture and eloquence are mixed arts whose end is sometimes beauty and sometimes use"
Translations
أوراق الشَّجَر
listy
bladeløv
lomb
lauf
lapija
lapotne
lístielisty

foliage

[ˈfəʊlɪɪdʒ] Nfollaje m, hojas fpl

foliage

[ˈfəʊliɪdʒ] n [plant] → feuillage mfolic acid [ˌfəʊlɪkˈæsɪd] nacide m folique

foliage

nBlätter pl; (of tree also)Laub(werk) nt

foliage

[ˈfəʊlɪɪdʒ] nfogliame m

foliage

(ˈfouliidʒ) noun
leaves. This plant has dark foliage.
References in classic literature ?
The different pieces were thrown out, one after the other, and they disappeared below, making huge gaps in the foliage of the sycamores.
A shower of snow fell upon them, and, finding the Olive full of foliage, it settled upon its branches and broke them down with its weight, at once despoiling it of its beauty and killing the tree.
But these unfailing signs of the supernatural are partly concealed and greatly softened by the abundant foliage of a large vine overrunning the entire structure.
But what neither the Swedes nor the baboons saw was the half-naked figure of a youth hidden in the foliage of a nearby tree.
Naught tickled his palate so greatly; but to stalk Bara with Go-bu-balu at his heels, was out of the question, so he hid the child in the crotch of a tree where the thick foliage screened him from view, and set off swiftly and silently upon the spoor of Bara.
Their craggy sides are clothed with vegetation, and white specks of houses peep out from the luxuriant foliage everywhere; they are even perched upon jutting and picturesque pinnacles a thousand feet above your head.
The cat sprang nimbly up a tree, and sat down at the top of it, where the branches and foliage quite concealed her.
Sad and pale the Autumn moonlight Through the sighing foliage streams; And each morning, midnight shadow, Shadow of my sorrow seems; Strive, 0 heart, forget thine idol
The light of the half moon fell ghostly through the foliage of trees in spots and patches, revealing much that was unsightly, and the black shadows seemed conspiracies withholding to the proper time revelations of darker import.
I had crossed a marshy tract full of willows, bulrushes, and odd, outlandish, swampy trees; and I had now come out upon the skirts of an open piece of undulating, sandy country, about a mile long, dotted with a few pines and a great number of contorted trees, not unlike the oak in growth, but pale in the foliage, like willows.
Pepper plants replaced the prickly hedges of European fields; sago-bushes, large ferns with gorgeous branches, varied the aspect of this tropical clime; while nutmeg-trees in full foliage filled the air with a penetrating perfume.
The little river which turned sharply in its course, and was thus immediately lost to sight, seemed to have no exit from its prison, but to be absorbed by the deep green foliage of the trees to the east -- while in the opposite quarter (so it appeared to me as I lay at length and glanced upward) there poured down noiselessly and continuously into the valley, a rich golden and crimson waterfall from the sunset fountains of the sky.