folio

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fo·li·o

 (fō′lē-ō′)
n. pl. fo·li·os
1.
a. A large sheet of paper folded once in the middle, making two leaves or four pages of a book or manuscript.
b. A book or manuscript of the largest common size, usually about 38 centimeters (15 inches) in height, consisting of such folded sheets.
2.
a. A leaf of a book numbered only on the front side.
b. A number on such a leaf.
c. A page number.
3. Law A specific number of words used as a unit for measuring the length of the text of a legal document.
tr.v. fo·li·oed, fo·li·o·ing, fo·li·os
To number consecutively the pages or leaves of (a book, for example).

[Middle English, from Late Latin foliō, ablative of folium, leaf of paper, from Latin, leaf; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

folio

(ˈfəʊlɪəʊ)
n, pl -lios
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a sheet of paper folded in half to make two leaves for a book or manuscript
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a book or manuscript of the largest common size made up of such sheets
3. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a leaf of paper or parchment numbered on the front side only
4. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a page number in a book
5. (Law) law a unit of measurement of the length of legal documents, determined by the number of words, generally 72 or 90 in Britain and 100 in the US
6. NZ a collection of related material
adj
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) relating to or having the format of a folio: a folio edition.
vb, -lios, -lioing or -lioed
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (tr) to number the leaves of (a book) consecutively
[C16: from Latin phrase in foliō in a leaf, from folium leaf]

fo•li•o

(ˈfoʊ liˌoʊ)

n., pl. -li•os,
n.
1. a sheet of paper folded once to make two leaves, or four pages, of a book or manuscript.
2. a volume having pages of the largest size, formerly made from such a sheet.
3. a leaf of a manuscript or book numbered only on the front side.
4.
a. (in a book) the number of each page.
b. (in a newspaper) the number of each page together with the date and the name of the newspaper.
5. Law. a certain number of words, in the U.S. generally 100, taken as a unit for computing the length of a document.
adj.
6. pertaining to or having the format of a folio: a folio volume.
v.t.
7. to number each leaf or page of.
[1525–35; < Latin foliō]

folio


Past participle: folioed
Gerund: folioing

Imperative
folio
folio
Present
I folio
you folio
he/she/it folios
we folio
you folio
they folio
Preterite
I folioed
you folioed
he/she/it folioed
we folioed
you folioed
they folioed
Present Continuous
I am folioing
you are folioing
he/she/it is folioing
we are folioing
you are folioing
they are folioing
Present Perfect
I have folioed
you have folioed
he/she/it has folioed
we have folioed
you have folioed
they have folioed
Past Continuous
I was folioing
you were folioing
he/she/it was folioing
we were folioing
you were folioing
they were folioing
Past Perfect
I had folioed
you had folioed
he/she/it had folioed
we had folioed
you had folioed
they had folioed
Future
I will folio
you will folio
he/she/it will folio
we will folio
you will folio
they will folio
Future Perfect
I will have folioed
you will have folioed
he/she/it will have folioed
we will have folioed
you will have folioed
they will have folioed
Future Continuous
I will be folioing
you will be folioing
he/she/it will be folioing
we will be folioing
you will be folioing
they will be folioing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been folioing
you have been folioing
he/she/it has been folioing
we have been folioing
you have been folioing
they have been folioing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been folioing
you will have been folioing
he/she/it will have been folioing
we will have been folioing
you will have been folioing
they will have been folioing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been folioing
you had been folioing
he/she/it had been folioing
we had been folioing
you had been folioing
they had been folioing
Conditional
I would folio
you would folio
he/she/it would folio
we would folio
you would folio
they would folio
Past Conditional
I would have folioed
you would have folioed
he/she/it would have folioed
we would have folioed
you would have folioed
they would have folioed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.folio - the system of numbering pagesfolio - the system of numbering pages  
page - one side of one leaf (of a book or magazine or newspaper or letter etc.) or the written or pictorial matter it contains
number - a concept of quantity involving zero and units; "every number has a unique position in the sequence"
2.folio - a sheet of any written or printed material (especially in a manuscript or book)
piece of paper, sheet of paper, sheet - paper used for writing or printing
flyleaf - a blank leaf in the front or back of a book
interleaf - a blank leaf inserted between the leaves of a book
page - one side of one leaf (of a book or magazine or newspaper or letter etc.) or the written or pictorial matter it contains
black and white, written communication, written language - communication by means of written symbols (either printed or handwritten)
3.folio - a book (or manuscript) consisting of large sheets of paper folded in the middle to make two leaves or four pages; "the first folio of Shakespeare's plays"
book, volume - physical objects consisting of a number of pages bound together; "he used a large book as a doorstop"
Translations
كتاب أوراقُه من حجم فوليووَرَقَه
foliolist
bog i folioformatfolio
folioinfolio
fólióívrét
bók í arkarbrotifólíó, arkarbrot
foliantaspusiau sulenktas lapas
foliantsfolio
fólio
büyük boyutlu kitapikiye katlanmış kâğıt tabakası

folio

[ˈfəʊlɪəʊ] N (= sheet) → folio m; (= book) → infolio m, libro m en folio

folio

n
(= sheet)Folio nt
(= volume)Foliant m

folio

[ˈfəʊlɪəʊ] n (book) → volume m in folio; (sheet) → foglio

folio

(ˈfouliou) plural ˈfolios noun
1. a sheet of paper folded once.
2. a book in which the pages are made of sheets of paper folded once. Shakespeare's plays were first printed in folio.
References in classic literature ?
The book I had a mind to read, was put up leaning against the wall: I first mounted to the upper step of the ladder, and turning my face towards the book, began at the top of the page, and so walking to the right and left about eight or ten paces, according to the length of the lines, till I had gotten a little below the level of mine eyes, and then descending gradually till I came to the bottom: after which I mounted again, and began the other page in the same manner, and so turned over the leaf, which I could easily do with both my hands, for it was as thick and stiff as a pasteboard, and in the largest folios not above eighteen or twenty feet long.
Collins had followed him after breakfast; and there he would continue, nominally engaged with one of the largest folios in the collection, but really talking to Mr.
There were huge, ponderous folios, and quartos, and little duodecimos, in English, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Chaldaic, and all other languages that either originated at the confusion of Babel or have since come into use.
Doctor Cacaphodel, the alchemist, returned to his laboratory with a prodigious fragment of granite, which he ground to powder, dissolved in acids, melted in the crucible, and burned with the blow-pipe, and published the result of his experiments in one of the heaviest folios of the day.
Among these was the great general himself, whose head of silver and face of bronze, like that of a brazen eagle, were often to be found bent over the charts and folios of the library.
The various distinguished people who had fingered his clavecins, and turned over the [140] folios of music, for half a century past, had left their memories behind them; M.
He leaned forward towards his counsel, Maitre Henri Robert, who, assisted by his chief secretary, Maitre Andre Hesse, was busily turning over the folios of his brief.
He had left sundry folios, and certain boxes well stored with botanical specimens and defunct animals, under the good keeping of Ishmael, and it immediately struck his acute mind, that marauders as subtle as the Siouxes would never neglect the opportunity to despoil him of these treasures.
Tom Swift, who had been slowly looking through the pages of a magazine, in the contents of which he seemed to be deeply interested, turned the final folio, ruffled the sheets back again to look at a certain map and drawing, and then, slapping the book down on a table before him, with a noise not unlike that of a shot, exclaimed:
But the story would include a chain of events extending over the better part of two centuries, and, written out with reasonable amplitude, would fill a bigger folio volume, or a longer series of duodecimos, than could prudently be appropriated to the annals of all New England during a similar period.
Here, on the cushion, lay a folio tome, probably of the Chronicles of England, or other such substantial literature; even as, in our own days, we scatter gilded volumes on the centre table, to be turned over by the casual guest.
He sometimes takes the great Folio whales by the lip, and hangs there like a leech, till the mighty brute is worried to death.