folk


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Related to folk: folk rock, Folk tales

folk

 (fōk)
n. pl. folk or folks
1.
a. The common people of a society or region considered as the representatives of a traditional way of life and especially as the originators or carriers of the customs, beliefs, and arts that make up a distinctive culture: a leader who came from the folk.
b. Archaic A nation; a people.
2. folks Informal People in general: Folks around here are very friendly.
3. often folks People of a specified group or kind: city folks; rich folk.
4. folks Informal
a. One's parents: My folks are coming for a visit.
b. The members of one's family or childhood household; one's relatives.
adj.
Of, occurring in, or originating among the common people: folk culture; a folk hero.
Idiom:
just folks Informal
Down-to-earth, open-hearted.

[Middle English, from Old English folc; see pelə- in Indo-European roots.]

folk

(fəʊk)
n, pl folk or folks
1. (functioning as plural; often plural in form) people in general, esp those of a particular group or class: country folk.
2. (functioning as plural; usually plural in form) informal members of a family
3. (Music, other) (functioning as singular) informal short for folk music
4. a people or tribe
5. (Anthropology & Ethnology) (modifier) relating to, originating from, or traditional to the common people of a country: a folk song.
[Old English folc; related to Old Saxon, Old Norse, Old High German folk]
ˈfolkish adj
ˈfolkishness n

folk

(foʊk)

n.
1. Usu., folks. (used with a pl. v.) people in general.
2. Often, folks. (used with a pl. v.) people of a specified class or group: country folk; poor folks.
3. (used with a pl. v.) people as the carriers of culture, esp. as representing a society's mores, customs, and traditions.
4. folks, Informal.
a. members of one's family; one's relatives.
b. one's parents.
5. Archaic. a people or tribe.
adj.
6. of or originating among the common people: folk beliefs; folk dances.
7. having unknown origins and reflecting the traditional forms of a society: folk art.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English folc]
folk′ish, adj.

Folk

 people in general; members of a family. See also kinsfolk.

folk

folks

Folk and folks are sometimes used to refer to particular groups of people. Both these words are plural nouns. You always use a plural form of a verb with them.

1. 'folk'

Folk is sometimes used with a modifier to refer to all the people who have a particular characteristic.

Country folk are a suspicious lot.
She was like all the old folk, she did everything in strict rotation.

However, this is not a common use. You usually say country people or old people, rather than 'country folk' or 'old folk'.

2. 'folks'

Your folks are your close family, especially your mother and father. This usage is more common in American English than in British English.

I don't even have time to write letters to my folks.
Vera's visiting her folks up in Paducah.

Some people use folks when addressing a group of people in an informal way. This use is more common in American English than in British English.

That's all for tonight, folks.
They saw me drive out of town taking you folks up to McCaslin.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.folk - people in general (often used in the plural)folk - people in general (often used in the plural); "they're just country folk"; "folks around here drink moonshine"; "the common people determine the group character and preserve its customs from one generation to the next"
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
country people, countryfolk - people raised in or living in a rural environment; rustics
gentlefolk - people of good family and breeding and high social status
grass roots - the common people at a local level (as distinguished from the centers of political activity)
home folk - folks from your own home town
ragtag, ragtag and bobtail, riffraff, rabble - disparaging terms for the common people
pleb, plebeian - one of the common people
2.folk - a social division of (usually preliterate) peoplefolk - a social division of (usually preliterate) people
social group - people sharing some social relation
moiety - one of two basic subdivisions of a tribe
phyle - a tribe of ancient Athenians
3.folk - people descended from a common ancestorfolk - people descended from a common ancestor; "his family has lived in Massachusetts since the Mayflower"
people - members of a family line; "his people have been farmers for generations"; "are your people still alive?"
homefolk - the people of your home locality (especially your own family); "he wrote his homefolk every day"
house - aristocratic family line; "the House of York"
dynasty - a sequence of powerful leaders in the same family
gens, name - family based on male descent; "he had no sons and there was no one to carry on his name"
blood line, bloodline, ancestry, lineage, pedigree, stemma, line of descent, parentage, blood, origin, descent, stock, line - the descendants of one individual; "his entire lineage has been warriors"
4.folk - the traditional and typically anonymous music that is an expression of the life of people in a communityfolk - the traditional and typically anonymous music that is an expression of the life of people in a community
folk ballad, folk song, folksong - a song that is traditionally sung by the common people of a region and forms part of their culture
schottische - music performed for dancing the schottische
popular music, popular music genre - any genre of music having wide appeal (but usually only for a short time)
C and W, country and western, country music - a simple style of folk music heard mostly in the southern United States; usually played on stringed instruments
gospel singing, gospel - folk music consisting of a genre of a cappella music originating with Black slaves in the United States and featuring call and response; influential on the development of other genres of popular music (especially soul)
square-dance music - music performed for square dancing

folk

noun
2. (usually plural) family, parents, relations, relatives, tribe, clan, kin, kindred I've been avoiding my folks lately.
Proverbs
"There's nowt so queer as folk"
Translations
أناسشَعْبي، ريفي
lidélidový
folkfolke-mennesker
alòÿîu-, òjóî-fólk
folklorasliaudiesliaudinisliaudismaniškiai
ļaudistautas-
domačiljudje
halkhalka ait

folk

[fəʊk]
A. N
1. (= people) → gente f
country/city folkla gente de campo/ciudad
ordinary folkla gente llana
they're strange folk hereaquí la gente es algo rara
the common folkel pueblo
my folks (= parents) → mis viejos mpl; (= family) → mi familia
the old folkslos viejos
hello folks!¡hola, amigos!
2. = folk music
see B
B. CPD folk art Nartesanía f popular or tradicional
folk dance Nbaile m popular
folk dancing Ndanza f folklórica
folk music N (traditional) → música f tradicional or folklórica; (contemporary) → música f folk
folk rock Nfolk rock m
folk singer Ncantante mf de música folk
folk song Ncanción f tradicional
folk tale Ncuento m popular
folk wisdom Nsaber m popular

folk

[ˈfəʊk]
n
(= people) → gens mpl
ordinary folk → gens mpl ordinaires folk medicine
(MUSIC)folk f folks
npl
(= parents) → parents mpl
my folks → mes parents
(= people) → gens mpl
old folks → personnes fpl âgées
(term of address)les enfants
It's a question of money, folks → C'est une question d'argent, les enfants.
adj
(MUSIC) [band, artist, revival] → folk inv; [musician, festival, concert] → de folk, de musique folk
[hero, legend, tradition, belief] → populairefolk art nart m populairefolk dance folk dancing ndanse f folklorique

folk

pl
(also folks: inf: = people) → Leute pl; (= people in general)die Leute, man; a lot of folk(s) believe …viele (Leute) glauben; there were a lot of folk at the concertes waren eine Menge Leute bei dem Konzert; come on, folks (inf)na los, Leute!; the young/old folkdie Jungen/Alten; old folk can’t …alte Menschen können nicht
(inf: = relatives: also folks) my folksmeine Leute (inf); the old folk(s) stayed at homedie alten Herrschaften blieben zu Haus

folk

:
folk dance
nVolkstanz m
folklore
nFolklore f, → Volkskunde f
folk medicine
nVolksmedizin f
folk memory
folk music
nVolksmusik f
folk singer
nSänger(in) m(f)von Volksliedern; (modern songs) → Folksänger(in) m(f)
folk song
nVolkslied nt; (modern) → Folksong m

folk

[fəʊk] n
a. (people) → gente f
country/city folk → gente di campagna/di città
my folks (fam) → i miei
b. (also folk music) → folk m inv

folk

(fouk) noun plural
(especially American folks) people. The folk in this town are very friendly.
adjective
(of the traditions) of the common people of a country. folk customs; folk dance; folk music.
folks noun plural
one's family. My folks all live nearby.
ˈfolklore noun
the study of the customs, beliefs, stories, traditions etc of a particular people. the folklore of the American Indians.
References in classic literature ?
The daughter was just leaving the house to attend the meeting of a branch Folk Lore Society, and regretted that she could not accompany them.
It is said by some to be the ghost of a Hessian trooper, whose head had been carried away by a cannon-ball, in some nameless battle during the Revolutionary War, and who is ever and anon seen by the country folk hurrying along in the gloom of night, as if on the wings of the wind.
At this, with one of the quick turns of simple folk, she suddenly flamed up.
Than longen folk to gon on pilgrimages, And palmeres for to seken strange strondes.
I was training a crowd of ignorant folk into experts -- experts in every sort of handiwork and scientific calling.
One afternoon I got lost in the woods about a mile from the hotel, and presently fell into a train of dreamy thought about animals which talk, and kobolds, and enchanted folk, and the rest of the pleasant legendary stuff; and so, by stimulating my fancy, I finally got to imagining I glimpsed small flitting shapes here and there down the columned aisles of the forest.
The folk in Cambridge often gloated on the spectacle of Longfellow and Lowell arm in arm.
Are we going to murder folk on our very door-stones?
I've no patience with folk as sits an' just stares at good bread an' meat.
The mowld o' the churchyard don't hold any that the folk shrink away from, more.
All cleverness, whether in the rapid use of that difficult instrument the tongue, or in some other art unfamiliar to villagers, was in itself suspicious: honest folk, born and bred in a visible manner, were mostly not overwise or clever--at least, not beyond such a matter as knowing the signs of the weather; and the process by which rapidity and dexterity of any kind were acquired was so wholly hidden, that they partook of the nature of conjuring.
This woman's son was foolish: he went to wander in the forest, saying that he cared nothing for ghosts, and the Amatongo, the ghost- folk, killed him.