follow suit


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Related to follow suit: defer to, catch up, pay heed, holding up

fol·low

 (fŏl′ō)
v. fol·lowed, fol·low·ing, fol·lows
v.tr.
1.
a. To come or go after; proceed behind: Follow the usher to your seat.
b. To go after in pursuit: would follow his enemy to the ends of the earth.
c. To keep under surveillance: The agent followed the suspect around town.
2.
a. To move along the course of; take: We followed the path.
b. To move in the direction of; be guided by: followed the sun westward; followed the signs to the zoo.
c. To lie in the same path as: The road follows the old trading route.
d. To be parallel to: The road follows the river.
3. To accept the guidance, command, or leadership of: follow a spiritual master; rebels who refused to follow their leader.
4. To adhere to; practice: followed family traditions.
5. To take as a model or precedent; imitate: followed my example and resigned.
6.
a. To act in agreement or compliance with; obey: follow the rules; follow one's instincts.
b. To keep to or stick to: followed the recipe; follow a diet.
7. To engage in (a trade or occupation); work at.
8. To come after in order, time, or position: Night follows day.
9. To bring something about at a later time than or as a consequence of: She followed her lecture with a question-and-answer period. The band followed its hit album with a tour.
10. To occur or be evident as a consequence of: Your conclusion does not follow your premise.
11.
a. To watch or observe closely: followed the bird through binoculars.
b. To be attentive to; pay close heed to: too sleepy to follow the sermon.
c. To keep oneself informed of the course, progress, or fortunes of: follow the stock market; followed the local teams.
12. To grasp the meaning or logic of; understand: Do you follow my argument?
v.intr.
1. To come, move, or take place after another person or thing in order or time.
2. To occur or be evident as a consequence; result: If you ignore your diet, trouble will follow.
3. To grasp the meaning or reasoning of something; understand.
n.
Games A billiards shot in which the cue ball is struck above center so that it follows the path of the object ball after impact.
Phrasal Verbs:
follow along
To move or proceed in unison or in accord with an example: followed along with the song.
follow through
1. Sports To carry a stroke to natural completion after hitting or releasing a ball or other object.
2. To carry an act, project, or intention to completion; pursue fully: followed through on her promise to fix the oven.
follow up
To increase the effectiveness or enhance the success of by further action: followed up her interview with an email.
Idioms:
as follows
As will be stated next. Used to introduce a specified enumeration, explanation, or command.
follow (one's) nose
1. To move straight ahead or in a direct path.
2. Informal To be guided by instinct: had no formal training but became a success by following his nose.
follow suit
1. Games To play a card of the same suit as the one led.
2. To do as another has done; follow an example.

[Middle English folowen, from Old English folgian.]

fol′low·er·ship′ n.
Synonyms: follow, succeed, ensue, result
These verbs mean to come after something or someone. Follow, the most general, refers to people or things that come after another in time or order or as a consequence or result: You go first, and we'll follow. He disregarded doctor's orders, and a relapse soon followed. To succeed is to come next after another, especially in planned order determined by considerations such as rank, inheritance, or election: The heir apparent succeeded to the throne. Ensue and result are used only of events or conditions that follow another in time. Ensue usually applies to what is a consequence: After the government was toppled, chaos ensued. Result implies that what follows is caused by what has preceded: Driving over the speed limit can result in a fine.
Usage Note: As follows (not as follow) is the established form of the idiom regardless of whether the noun that precedes it is singular or plural: The regulations are as follows.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.follow suit - do what someone else is doing
imitate - appear like, as in behavior or appearance; "Life imitate art"
Translations
يَحْذو حَذْو، يَقْتَدي بِ
udělat totéž
følge trop
ugyanazt teszi
fara aî dæmi annars
urobiť to isté
aynı şeyi yapmakizinden gitmek

suit

(suːt) noun
1. a set of clothes usually all of the same cloth etc, made to be worn together, eg a jacket, trousers (and waistcoat) for a man, or a jacket and skirt or trousers for a woman.
2. a piece of clothing for a particular purpose. a bathing-suit / diving-suit.
3. a case in a law court. He won/lost his suit.
4. an old word for a formal request, eg a proposal of marriage to a lady.
5. one of the four sets of playing-cards – spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs.
verb
1. to satisfy the needs of, or be convenient for. The arrangements did not suit us; The climate suits me very well.
2. (of clothes, styles, fashions etc) to be right or appropriate for. Long hair suits her; That dress doen't suit her.
3. to adjust or make appropriate or suitable. He suited his speech to his audience.
ˈsuited adjective
(negative unsuited) fitted, or appropriate (to or for). I don't think he's suited to/for this work.
ˈsuitor noun
an old word for a man who tries to gain the love of a woman.
ˈsuitcase noun
a case with flat sides for clothes etc, used by a person when travelling. He hastily packed his (clothes in his) suitcase.
follow suit
to do just as someone else has done. He went to bed and I followed suit.
suit down to the ground
(of eg an arrangement, fashion etc) to suit (a person) completely. The dress suits her down to the ground.
suit oneself
to do what one wants to do.
References in classic literature ?
The other Growleywogs were not slow to follow suit, and even before they had finished drinking the Chief of the Whimsies and his people came to push them away, while they one and all cast off their false heads that they might slake their thirst at the fountain.
Gabriel had played his trump; and those of us who could not follow suit were arraigned for examination.
Whereupon cards followed, with aunt Kimble's annual failure to follow suit, and uncle Kimble's irascibility concerning the odd trick which was rarely explicable to him, when it was not on his side, without a general visitation of tricks to see that they were formed on sound principles: the whole being accompanied by a strong steaming odour of spirits-and-water.
You'll see men all round you going into the Staff Corps, and doing every possible sort of duty but regimental, and you may be tempted to follow suit.
But as 'them two clever ones'--Mrs Affery's perpetual reference, in whom her personality was swallowed up--were agreed to accept Little Dorrit as a matter of course, she had nothing for it but to follow suit.
Far away a sea would burst in a sheet of foam, and the others would follow suit as at a signal, till Harvey's eyes swam with the vision of interlacing whites and greys.
Then all of our contemporaries worth knowing follow suit, of course: we're very good friends at games and all that, but not a soul of them but you and Arthur ever tried to break through the crust, and see whether there was anything at the bottom of me; and then the bad ones I won't stand and they know that.
We must follow suit," said Hirst to Rachel, and he took her resolutely by the elbow.
Greece has warned that if the nation fails to default on its debts and is thus compelled to quit the euro zone, other regional countries will follow suit, therefore, destiny of the euro will be in question.
Gargash thanked the government of Sweden for its political and ethical position, and expressed the hope that other states of the world would follow suit.
No doubt a coaching or managerial role will follow suit some time soon for Cardi[euro] City's favourite son.
Massachusetts could help inspire other producers to follow suit.