fondness


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fond 1

 (fŏnd)
adj. fond·er, fond·est
1. Having a strong liking, inclination, or affection: fond of ballet; fond of my nieces and nephews.
2. Affectionate; tender: a fond embrace.
3. Immoderately affectionate or indulgent; doting: fond grandparents who tended to spoil the child.
4. Cherished; dear: my fondest hopes.
5. Archaic Naively credulous or foolish.

[Middle English fonned, foolish, probably from past participle of fonnen, to be foolish, probably from fonne, fool.]

fond′ly adv.
fond′ness n.

fond 2

 (fŏnd)
n.
The background of a design in lace.

[French, from Old French fonds, fond, from Latin fundus, bottom.]

fond•ness

(ˈfɒnd nɪs)

n.
1. the state or quality of being fond.
2. tenderness or affection.
3. doting affection.
4. a liking or weakness for something.
5. Archaic. complacent credulity.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fondness - a predisposition to like somethingfondness - a predisposition to like something; "he had a fondness for whiskey"
liking - a feeling of pleasure and enjoyment; "I've always had a liking for reading"; "she developed a liking for gin"
2.fondness - a positive feeling of likingfondness - a positive feeling of liking; "he had trouble expressing the affection he felt"; "the child won everyone's heart"; "the warmness of his welcome made us feel right at home"
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
attachment, fond regard - a feeling of affection for a person or an institution
protectiveness - a feeling of protective affection
regard, respect - a feeling of friendship and esteem; "she mistook his manly regard for love"; "he inspires respect"
soft spot - a sentimental affection; "she had a soft spot for her youngest son"
3.fondness - a quality proceeding from feelings of affection or lovefondness - a quality proceeding from feelings of affection or love
emotionalism, emotionality - emotional nature or quality
tenderness - a tendency to express warm and affectionate feeling
uxoriousness - foolish fondness for or excessive submissiveness to one's wife

fondness

fondness

noun
1. The condition of being closely tied to another by affection or faith:
2. A liking for something:
Translations
تَحَبُّب، وَلَع
láska
hengivenhedkærlighed
blíîa, ástríki
düşkünlük

fondness

[ˈfɒndnɪs] N (for person) → cariño m (for por) (for thing) → afición f (for a) his fondness for cookingsu afición a la cocina
there were rumours about her fondness for alcoholcorrían rumores sobre su afición al alcohol
he has a fondness for all things Italianle gusta mucho todo lo italianotiene inclinación por todo lo italiano
I remember my childhood with fondnessrecuerdo mi infancia con cariño

fondness

[ˈfɒndnɪs] n
(for thing) to have a fondness for sth → avoir un penchant pour qch
a special fondness for → une prédilection pour
to remember sth with fondness → garder un souvenir ému de qch
(for people)affection f
to remember sb with fondness → garder un souvenir attendri de qn

fondness

n (for people) → Zuneigung f, → Liebe f(for zu); (for food, place, writer etc) → Vorliebe f(for für); (for music, art) → Liebe f(for zu); his fondness for or of swimmingseine Vorliebe fürs Schwimmen; to remember something/past times with great fondnesssehr gern an etw (acc)/an vergangene Zeiten zurückdenken

fondness

[ˈfɒndnɪs] n fondness (for sth)predilezione f (per qc)
fondness (for sb) → affetto (per qn)

fond

(fond) adjective
1. loving. fond looks; a fond husband.
2. (of wishes, hopes etc) unlikely to be fulfilled. His fond ambition was to be a film star.
ˈfondly adverb
ˈfondness noun
(especially with for) affection; liking. her fondness for children.
fond of
having a liking for. He is very fond of dogs.
References in classic literature ?
Cora was seated nigh them, a calm and amused looker-on; regarding the wayward movements of her more youthful sister with that species of maternal fondness which characterized her love for Alice.
It was the caress which a dewy maiden--such as the Dawn is, immortally--gives to her sleeping sister, partly from the impulse of irresistible fondness, and partly as a pretty hint that it is time now to unclose her eyes.
A trait of native elegance, seldom seen in the masculine character after childhood or early youth, was shown in the General's fondness for the sight and fragrance of flowers.
Jurgis developed a fondness for having Ona on his arm whenever he went out on the street, and he would hold her tightly, and walk fast.
Seesaw Simpson was usually made commander-in-chief of the British army, and a limp and uncertain one he was, capable, with his contradictory orders and his fondness for the extreme rear, of leading any regiment to an inglorious death.
He was a married man, with only one living child, a girl, about Jane's age: and Jane became their guest, paying them long visits and growing a favourite with all; and before she was nine years old, his daughter's great fondness for her, and his own wish of being a real friend, united to produce an offer from Colonel Campbell of undertaking the whole charge of her education.
She treated her therefore, with all the indulgent fondness of a parent towards a favourite child on the last day of its holidays.
I had the means of an excellent education placed within my reach; a fondness for some of my studies, and a desire to excel in all, together with a great delight in pleasing my teachers, especially such as I loved, urged me on: I availed myself fully of the advantages offered me.
I gave due inward applause to every object, and then I remembered how old Earnshaw used to come in when all was tidied, and call me a cant lass, and slip a shilling into my hand as a Christmas-box; and from that I went on to think of his fondness for Heathcliff, and his dread lest he should suffer neglect after death had removed him: and that naturally led me to consider the poor lad's situation now, and from singing I changed my mind to crying.
Norah, whose fondness for reading had passed into a family proverb, took up book after book from table and shelf, and laid them down again, in despair of fixing her attention.
I am glad to recollect that when the carrier's cart was at the gate, and my mother stood there kissing me, a grateful fondness for her and for the old place I had never turned my back upon before, made me cry.
And sometimes, when her moods were so many and so contradictory of one another that I was puzzled what to say or do, Miss Havisham would embrace her with lavish fondness, murmuring something in her ear that sounded like "Break their hearts my pride and hope, break their hearts and have no mercy