food additive

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food additive

n
(Cookery) any of various natural or synthetic substances, such as salt, monosodium glutamate, or citric acid, used in the commercial processing of food as preservatives, antioxidants, emulsifiers, etc, in order to preserve or add flavour, colour, or texture to processed food
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.food additive - an additive to food intended to improve its flavor or appearance or shelf-lifefood additive - an additive to food intended to improve its flavor or appearance or shelf-life
additive - something added to enhance food or gasoline or paint or medicine
References in periodicals archive ?
Food Additives Market Size by Product [Sweeteners, Flavors & Enhancers, Emulsifiers, Enzymes, Fat Replacers], Industry Analysis Report, Regional Outlook, Application Potential, Price Trends, Competitive Market Share & Forecast, 2017 -- 2024
Requires the FDA to post the following information on its website: the number of petitions for animal food additives that are pending, and how long those petitions have been pending, as well as the number of animal study protocol proposals that have been pending for over 50 days, and those that have received an extension.
Back Ground and Objective: Busy life of today's world has led to consumption of processed food which contain food additives that can lead to health problems.
Unlike food additives, GRAS substances are not subject to FDA pre-market approval; however, they must meet the same safety standards as approved food additives.
Evaluation of Certain Food Additives: Seventy-Ninth Report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives
Researchers identified at least seven common food additives that weaken "tight junctions" in the intestine.
com)-- Any substances which change the characteristics of the food when added are known as food additives.
The Environmental Working Group (EWG), a non-profit dedicated to protecting human health and the environment through research, education and advocacy, launched its "Dirty Dozen Guide to Food Additives" in November 2014 to educate consumers about which food additives are associated with health concerns, which are restricted in other countries, and/or which just shouldn't be in our foods to begin with.
Neltner, director of a food additives project of the Pew Charitable Trusts, which funded the study.
Summary: A reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method for the successful separation and determination of 6 synthetic food additives (aspartame, acesulfame potassium, benzoic acid, sodium saccharin, tartrazine and sunset yellow) was developed.
It contains only food additives the safe use of which has already been scientifically evaluated.
Safety evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants; proceedings.

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