fool


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fool

 (fo͞ol)
n.
1. One who is deficient in judgment, sense, or understanding.
2. One who acts unwisely on a given occasion: I was a fool to have quit my job.
3. One who has been tricked or made to appear ridiculous; a dupe: They made a fool of me by pretending I had won.
4. Informal A person with a talent or enthusiasm for a certain activity: a dancing fool; a fool for skiing.
5. A member of a royal or noble household who provided entertainment, as with jokes or antics; a jester.
6. One who subverts convention or orthodoxy or varies from social conformity in order to reveal spiritual or moral truth: a holy fool.
7. A dessert made of stewed or puréed fruit mixed with cream or custard and served cold.
8. Archaic A mentally deficient person; an idiot.
v. fooled, fool·ing, fools
v.tr.
1. To deceive or trick; dupe: "trying to learn how to fool a trout with a little bit of floating fur and feather" (Charles Kuralt).
2. To confound or prove wrong; surprise, especially pleasantly: We were sure they would fail, but they fooled us.
v.intr.
1. Informal
a. To speak or act facetiously or in jest; joke: I was just fooling when I said I had to leave.
b. To behave comically; clown.
c. To feign; pretend: He said he had a toothache but he was only fooling.
2. To engage in idle or frivolous activity.
3. To toy, tinker, or mess: shouldn't fool with matches.
adj. Informal
Foolish; stupid: off on some fool errand or other.
Phrasal Verbs:
fool around Informal
1. To engage in idle or casual activity; putter: was fooling around with the old car in hopes of fixing it.
2. To engage in frivolous activity; make fun.
3. To engage in casual sexual activity.
4.
a. To have a sexual affair with someone who is not one's spouse or partner.
b. To have many sexual affairs.
fool away
To waste (time or money) foolishly; squander: fooled away the week's pay on Friday night.
Idiom:
play/act the fool
1. To act in an irresponsible or foolish manner.
2. To behave in a playful or comical manner.

[Middle English fol, from Old French, from Late Latin follis, windbag, fool, from Latin follis, bellows; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

fool

(fuːl)
n
1. a person who lacks sense or judgement
2. a person who is made to appear ridiculous
3. (Historical Terms) (formerly) a professional jester living in a royal or noble household
4. obsolete an idiot or imbecile: the village fool.
5. form the fool Caribbean to play the fool or behave irritatingly
6. no fool a wise or sensible person
7. play the fool act the fool to deliberately act foolishly; indulge in buffoonery
vb
8. (tr) to deceive (someone), esp in order to make him or her look ridiculous
9. (intr; foll by with, around with, or about with) informal to act or play (with) irresponsibly or aimlessly: to fool around with a woman.
10. (intr) to speak or act in a playful, teasing, or jesting manner
11. (foll by: away) to squander; fritter: he fooled away a fortune.
12. fool along US to move or proceed in a leisurely way
adj
informal short for foolish
[C13: from Old French fol mad person, from Late Latin follis empty-headed fellow, from Latin: bellows; related to Latin flāre to blow]

fool

(fuːl)
n
(Cookery) chiefly Brit a dessert made from a purée of fruit with cream or custard: gooseberry fool.
[C16: perhaps from fool1]

fool1

(ful)

n.
1. a silly or stupid person.
2. a professional jester, formerly kept by a person of rank for amusement: the court fool.
3. a person who has been tricked or deceived into appearing silly or stupid: to make a fool of someone.
4. an ardent enthusiast who cannot resist an opportunity to indulge an enthusiasm (usu. prec. by a present participle): a dancing fool.
v.t.
5. to trick, deceive, or impose on: They tried to fool us.
v.i.
6. to act like a fool; joke; play.
7. to jest; pretend; make believe: I was only fooling.
8. fool around,
a. to putter aimlessly; waste time.
b. to trifle or flirt.
c. to be sexually promiscuous; engage casually in sexual activity.
9. fool away, to squander foolishly, as time or money.
10. fool with, to handle or play with idly or carelessly.
Idioms:
act or play the fool, to engage in silly or stupid behavior.
[1225–75; Middle English fol, fool < Old French fol < Latin follis bellows, bag]

fool2

(ful)

n.
an English dessert of crushed, cooked fruit mixed with cream or custard and served cold: gooseberry fool.
[1590–1600]

fool


Past participle: fooled
Gerund: fooling

Imperative
fool
fool
Present
I fool
you fool
he/she/it fools
we fool
you fool
they fool
Preterite
I fooled
you fooled
he/she/it fooled
we fooled
you fooled
they fooled
Present Continuous
I am fooling
you are fooling
he/she/it is fooling
we are fooling
you are fooling
they are fooling
Present Perfect
I have fooled
you have fooled
he/she/it has fooled
we have fooled
you have fooled
they have fooled
Past Continuous
I was fooling
you were fooling
he/she/it was fooling
we were fooling
you were fooling
they were fooling
Past Perfect
I had fooled
you had fooled
he/she/it had fooled
we had fooled
you had fooled
they had fooled
Future
I will fool
you will fool
he/she/it will fool
we will fool
you will fool
they will fool
Future Perfect
I will have fooled
you will have fooled
he/she/it will have fooled
we will have fooled
you will have fooled
they will have fooled
Future Continuous
I will be fooling
you will be fooling
he/she/it will be fooling
we will be fooling
you will be fooling
they will be fooling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been fooling
you have been fooling
he/she/it has been fooling
we have been fooling
you have been fooling
they have been fooling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been fooling
you will have been fooling
he/she/it will have been fooling
we will have been fooling
you will have been fooling
they will have been fooling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been fooling
you had been fooling
he/she/it had been fooling
we had been fooling
you had been fooling
they had been fooling
Conditional
I would fool
you would fool
he/she/it would fool
we would fool
you would fool
they would fool
Past Conditional
I would have fooled
you would have fooled
he/she/it would have fooled
we would have fooled
you would have fooled
they would have fooled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fool - a person who lacks good judgmentfool - a person who lacks good judgment  
ass - a pompous fool
buffoon, clown - a rude or vulgar fool
fucker - a stupid despised man
bozo, cuckoo, fathead, goof, goofball, jackass, twat, zany, goose - a man who is a stupid incompetent fool
meshuggeneh, meshuggener - (Yiddish) a crazy fool
morosoph - a learned fool
putz - (Yiddish) a fool; an idiot
simpleton, simple - a person lacking intelligence or common sense
wally - a silly and inept person; someone who is regarded as stupid
2.fool - a person who is gullible and easy to take advantage offool - a person who is gullible and easy to take advantage of
dupe, victim - a person who is tricked or swindled
3.fool - a professional clown employed to entertain a king or nobleman in the Middle Agesfool - a professional clown employed to entertain a king or nobleman in the Middle Ages
merry andrew, buffoon, clown, goof, goofball - a person who amuses others by ridiculous behavior
Verb1.fool - make a fool or dupe of
cozen, deceive, delude, lead on - be false to; be dishonest with
2.fool - spend frivolously and unwisely; "Fritter away one's inheritance"
ware, squander, consume, waste - spend extravagantly; "waste not, want not"
3.fool - fool or hoaxfool - fool or hoax; "The immigrant was duped because he trusted everyone"; "You can't fool me!"
kid, pull the leg of - tell false information to for fun; "Are you pulling my leg?"
deceive, lead astray, betray - cause someone to believe an untruth; "The insurance company deceived me when they told me they were covering my house"
4.fool - indulge in horseplayfool - indulge in horseplay; "Enough horsing around--let's get back to work!"; "The bored children were fooling about"
jest, joke - tell a joke; speak humorously; "He often jokes even when he appears serious"
play - be at play; be engaged in playful activity; amuse oneself in a way characteristic of children; "The kids were playing outside all day"; "I used to play with trucks as a little girl"

fool

noun
1. simpleton, idiot, mug (Brit. slang), berk (Brit. slang), charlie (Brit. informal), silly, goose (informal), dope (informal), jerk (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), dummy (slang), ass (U.S. & Canad. taboo slang), clot (Brit. informal), plank (Brit. slang), sap (slang), prick (derogatory slang), wally (slang), illiterate, prat (slang), plonker (slang), coot, moron, nit (informal), git (Brit. slang), geek (slang), twit (informal, chiefly Brit.), bonehead (slang), chump (informal), dunce, imbecile (informal), loon, clod, cretin, oaf, bozo (U.S. slang), dullard, dimwit (informal), ignoramus, dumbo (slang), jackass, dipstick (Brit. slang), dickhead (slang), gonzo (slang), schmuck (U.S. slang), dork (slang), nitwit (informal), dolt, blockhead, ninny, divvy (Brit. slang), bird-brain (informal), pillock (Brit. slang), halfwit, nincompoop, dweeb (U.S. slang), putz (U.S. slang), fathead (informal), weenie (U.S. informal), schlep (U.S. slang), eejit (Scot. & Irish), thicko (Brit. slang), dumb-ass (slang), pea-brain (slang), gobshite (Irish taboo slang), dunderhead, numpty (Scot. informal), doofus (slang, chiefly U.S.), lamebrain (informal), fuckwit (taboo slang), mooncalf, thickhead, clodpate (archaic), dickwit (slang), nerd or nurd (slang), numbskull or numskull, twerp or twirp (informal) He'd been a fool to get involved with her.
simpleton expert, master, genius, scholar, sage, boffin (Brit. informal), wise man, rocket scientist (informal, chiefly U.S.), savant, fundi (S. African)
2. dupe, butt, mug (Brit. slang), sucker (slang), gull (archaic), stooge (slang), laughing stock, pushover (informal), fall guy (informal), chump (informal), greenhorn (informal), easy mark (informal) He feels she has made a fool of him.
3. jester, comic, clown, harlequin, motley, buffoon, pierrot, court jester, punchinello, joculator or (fem.) joculatrix, merry-andrew Every good court has its resident fool.
verb
1. deceive, cheat, mislead, delude, kid (informal), trick, take in, con (informal), stiff (slang), have (someone) on, bluff, hoax, dupe, beguile, gull (archaic), swindle, make a fool of, bamboozle, hoodwink, take for a ride (informal), put one over on (informal), play a trick on, pull a fast one on (informal) Art dealers fool a lot of people.
act or play the fool mess about, show off (informal), clown, play (silly) games, be silly, frolic, cavort, act up, lark about (informal), piss about (taboo slang), piss around (taboo slang), act the goat, cut capers, play the goat He likes to act the fool.
fool around or about
1. mess about, sleep around (informal), womanize (informal), philander, flirt, court, toy, trifle, mess about, mess around, dally, coquet Her husband was fooling around.
2. (Informal) mess about, hang around, idle, waste time, lark, play about, dawdle, kill time, fool about, play the fool, act the fool, footle (informal) Stop fooling about.
fool around with something (Informal) play around with, play with, tamper with, toy with, mess around with, meddle with, trifle with, fiddle around with (informal), monkey around with, piss about with (taboo slang), piss around with (taboo slang) He was fooling around with his cot, and he fell out of bed.
Quotations
"Fools rush in where angels fear to tread" [Alexander Pope An Essay on Criticism]
"A fool and his words are soon parted" [William Shenstone Works]
"A fool uttereth all his mind" Bible: Proverbs
"I am two fools, I know,"
"For loving, and for saying so"
"In whining poetry" [John Donne Songs and Sonnets]
"Who loves not woman, wine and song"
"Remains a fool his whole life long" [attributed to Martin Luther]
"Be wise with speed;"
"A fool at forty is a fool indeed" [Edward Young The Love of Fame]
"There's a sucker born every minute" [Phineas T. Barnum]
"You may fool all the people some of the time; you can even fool some of the people all the time; but you can't fool all of the people all the time" [attributed to both Phineas T. Barnum and Abraham Lincoln]
"A fool sees not the same tree that a wise man sees" [William Blake The Marriage of Heaven and Hell]
"A knowledgeable fool is a greater fool than an ignorant fool" [Molière Les Femmes Savantes]
Proverbs
"A fool and his money are soon parted"
"There's no fool like an old fool"
"Fools build houses and wise men live in them"
"A fool may give a wise man counsel"

fool

noun
1. One deficient in judgment and good sense:
Informal: dope, gander, goose.
2. A person who is easily deceived or victimized:
Informal: sucker.
Chiefly British: mug.
verb
1. To cause to accept what is false, especially by trickery or misrepresentation:
Informal: bamboozle, have.
Slang: four-flush.
2. To waste time by engaging in aimless activity:
3. To handle something idly, ignorantly, or destructively:
Informal: monkey.
4. To move one's fingers or hands in a nervous or aimless fashion:
phrasal verb
fool around
1. Informal. To waste time by engaging in aimless activity:
Informal: mess around.
2. Informal. To make jokes; behave playfully:
Informal: clown (around), fun.
3. Informal. To engage in kissing, caressing, and other amorous behavior:
Informal: neck, pet, spoon.
Slang: make out.
4. Informal. To be sexually unfaithful to another:
phrasal verb
fool away
To spend (money) excessively and usually foolishly:
Slang: blow.
Translations
أحْمَقمُغَفَّليَتَسَكَّع، يُمْضي وَقْتَه كالأحْمَقيَخْدَع، يَغُشيُضَلِّلُ
абдал
enganar
blázennapálithlupákklamatobelhávat
narnarretåbefjolle rundtfjols
typeryshölmöhovinarrihuijataidiootti
budalazavarati
bolondhülyéskedik
bjáni, heimskingiblekkja, leika áhaga sér eins og bjáni
だますばか者
바보속이다
stultus
kvailyspasirodyti kvailiupastatyti į kvailio padėtįvaizduoti kvailįapkvailinti
apmuļķotmuļķismuļķotmuļķoties
bufonpăcăliprostprosti
blázon
bedakbizgecbudalobukseljnorec
абдал
dåredumbomkrämluranarr
คนโง่หลอก
ahmakaldatmakaptalaptal gibi davranmakkandırmak
đánh lừađồ ngốc

fool

1 [fuːl]
A. N
1. (= idiot) → tonto/a m/f, zonzo/a m/f (LAm)
don't be a fool!¡no seas tonto!
I was a fool not to go!¡qué tonto fui en no ir!
to act the foolhacer el tonto
to be fool enough to do sthser lo bastante tonto como para hacer algo
to send sb on a fool's errandenviar a algn a una misión inútil
to make a fool of sbponer or dejar a algn en ridículo
to make a fool of o.squedar en ridículo
I'm nobody's foolyo no me chupo el dedo, yo no tengo un pelo de tonto
to play the foolhacer el tonto
some fool of a civil servantalgún funcionario imbécil
you fool!¡idiota!, ¡imbécil!
to live in a fool's paradisevivir de ilusiones
there's no fool like an old foolla cabeza blanca y el seso por venir
a fool and his money are soon parteda los tontos no les dura el dinero
fools rush in (where angels fear to tread)la ignorancia es osada
2. (= jester) → bufón m
B. ADJ (US) → tonto, zonzo (LAm)
C. VT (= deceive) → engañar
you can't fool mea mí no me engañas
"my husband has always been faithful to me" - "you could have fooled me!" (iro) → -mi marido siempre me ha sido fiel -¡qué fiel ni qué ocho cuartos!
you had me fooled therecasi lo creí, por poco me lo trago
that fooled him!¡aquello coló!, ¡se lo tragó!
that fooled nobodyaquello no engañó a nadie, nadie se tragó aquello
D. VIhacer el tonto
no foolingen serio
I was only foolingsólo era una broma
quit fooling!¡déjate de tonterías!
fool about fool around VI + ADV
1. (= waste time) → perder el tiempo
2. (= act the fool) → hacer el tonto
to fool about with sth (= play with) → jugar con algo; (and damage) → estropear algo; (= mess with) [+ drugs, drink, electricity] → jugar con
3. (= have an affair) to fool around with sbtontear con algn
fool with VI + PREP to fool with sbjugar con algn, hacer el tonto con algn

fool

[ˈfuːl]
nidiot(e) m/f
He was a fool to get involved with her → Il a été idiot de s'attacher à elle.
to make a fool of o.s. → se couvrir de ridicule
to make a fool of sb (= make look foolish) → tourner qn en ridicule (= trick) → avoir qn, duper qn
more fool you! (British)quel nigaud!
(HISTORY) [king] → bouffon m, fou m
to play the fool (= mess about) → faire le fou(la)(folle)
to act the fool, to play the fool (= behave stupidly) → se conduire bêtement
(= dessert) → purée f de fruits à la crème
vt (= trick) → berner, duper
You can't fool me
BUT Vous ne me la ferez pas.; On ne me la fait pas.
to fool sb into doing sth → duper qn pour lui faire faire qch, berner qn pour lui faire faire qch
vi
to fool with sth (= have dealings with) → plaisanter avec qch
to fool with sb (= take risks) → plaisanter avec qn
fool around
vi
(= waste time) → traînailler, glandouiller
(= behave foolishly) → faire le fou

fool

1
n
Dummkopf m, → Narr m, → Närrin f; don’t be a fool!sei nicht (so) dumm!; some fool of a civil servantirgend so ein blöder or doofer Beamter (inf); I was a fool not to realizewie konnte ich nur so dumm sein und das nicht merken; have I been a fool!war ich vielleicht dumm or blöd!, ich Idiot!; he was a fool not to acceptes war dumm von ihm, nicht anzunehmen; to be fool enough to …so dumm or blöd (inf)sein, zu …; to play or act the foolUnsinn machen, herumalbern; he made himself look a fool in front of everyoneer machte sich vor allen lächerlich; to make a fool of somebody (with ridicule) → jdn lächerlich machen; (with a trick) → jdn zum Besten or zum Narren haben; he made a fool of himself at the partyer hat sich bei der Party blamiert; to go on a fool’s errandeinen nutzlosen Gang tun; to live in a fool’s paradisein einem Traumland leben; there’s no fool like an old fool (Prov) → Alter schützt vor Torheit nicht (Prov); fools rush in (where angels fear to tread) (Prov) → blinder Eifer schadet nur (Prov) ? more, nobody
(= jester)Narr m
adj (esp US inf) → doof (inf), → schwachsinnig (inf)
viherumalbern, Blödsinn machen; to fool with somebody/somethingmit jdm/etw spielen; stop fooling (around)!lass den Blödsinn!; I was only foolingdas war doch nur Spaß
vtzum Narren haben or halten; (= trick)hereinlegen (inf); (disguise, phoney accent etc)täuschen; you won’t fool me so easilyso leicht können Sie mich nicht hereinlegen (inf); I was completely fooledich bin vollkommen darauf hereingefallen; you had me fooledich habe das tatsächlich geglaubt; who are you trying to fool?wem willst du das weismachen?; they fooled him into believing that …sie haben ihm weisgemacht, dass …; they fooled him into believing iter hat es ihnen tatsächlich abgenommen

fool

[fuːl]
1. n
a.sciocco/a, stupido/a, fesso/a; (jester) → buffone m, giullare m
you fool! → stupido!
don't be a fool! → non fare lo stupido!
I was a fool not to go → sono stato stupido a non andarci
some fool of a civil servant → uno stupido di impiegato statale
to play the fool → fare lo/la stupido/a
to live in a fool's paradise (fig) → vivere di illusioni
he is nobody's fool → non è mica scemo
to make a fool of sb → far fare a qn la figura dello scemo, prendere in giro qn
to make a fool of o.s. → rendersi or coprirsi di ridicolo/a
to go on a fool's errand → fare la strada per niente
b. (Culin) → frullato
2. adj (Am) → sciocco/a
3. vt (deceive) → ingannare, far fesso/a
you can't fool me → non mi inganni
4. vischerzare
I was only fooling → stavo solo scherzando
fool about fool around vi + adv
a. (waste time) → perdere tempo
b. (act the fool) → fare lo/la stupido/a

fool

(fuːl) noun
a person without sense or intelligence. He is such a fool he never knows what to do.
verb
1. to deceive. She completely fooled me with her story.
2. (often with about or around) to act like a fool or playfully. Stop fooling about!
ˈfoolish adjective
1. having no sense. He is a foolish young man.
2. ridiculous. He looked very foolish.
ˈfoolishly adverb
ˈfoolishness noun
ˈfoolhardy adjective
taking foolish risks; rash. He made a foolhardy attempt to climb the mountain in winter.
ˈfoolhardiness noun
ˈfoolproof adjective
unable to go wrong. His new plan seems completely foolproof.
make a fool of
to make (someone) appear ridiculous or stupid. He made a real fool of her by promising to marry her and then leaving her when he had spent all her money.
make a fool of oneself
to act in such a way that people consider one ridiculous or stupid. She made a fool of herself at the party.
play the fool
to act in a foolish manner, especially with the intention of amusing other people. He always played the fool when the teacher left the classroom.

fool

مُغَفَّل, يُضَلِّلُ hlupák, napálit narre, tåbe Narr, täuschen κοροϊδεύω, κορόιδο engañar, tonto huijata, typerys idiot, tromper budala, zavarati buffone, ingannare だます, ばか者 바보, 속이다 dwaas, voor de gek houden dust, lure głupiec, wygłupić się bobo, enganar, pateta дурак, дурачить dumbom, lura คนโง่, หลอก ahmak, kandırmak đánh lừa, đồ ngốc 傻瓜, 愚弄
References in classic literature ?
I knew it was silly, but they flattered me and said I was a beauty, and quantities of nonsense, so I let them make a fool of me.
Harling told him firmly that she would keep fifty dollars a year for Antonia's own use, he declared they wanted to take his sister to town and dress her up and make a fool of her.
You know I have a quick temper, but I don't want to quarrel or be rude to a woman, especially my wife; yet I'm driven to it, and feel like ten thousand devils after I've made a fool of myself.
Ah, my dear fellow, you can't fool us that way --you can't fool us.
Then Jurgis covered his face with his hands, for there were tears in his eyes, and he felt like a fool.
It injured the frauds some; but the old fool he bulled right along, spite of all the duke could say or do, and I tell you the duke was powerful uneasy.
Why, he must have thought it, unless he IS the downrightest fool in the world; because if he hadn't thought it, he would have wanted to own the whole dog, knowing that if he killed his half and the other half died, he would be responsible for that half just the same as if he had killed that half instead of his own.
that was I, my father--"this fool who calls himself 'Mouth'
Swine, fool, swine,'' said the herd, ``every fool knows that.
Rousing myself from my reverie I turned the glass Northward for the last time in the old Millennium; and in the act, I exclaimed aloud, "The boy is a fool.
Not until we had turned into the Avenue did she utter a word; but from that point onwards, until we arrived at the hotel, she kept venting exclamations of "What a fool I am
His fool, or professional jester, was not only a fool, however.