fooling


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Related to fooling: fooling around

fool

 (fo͞ol)
n.
1. One who is deficient in judgment, sense, or understanding.
2. One who acts unwisely on a given occasion: I was a fool to have quit my job.
3. One who has been tricked or made to appear ridiculous; a dupe: They made a fool of me by pretending I had won.
4. Informal A person with a talent or enthusiasm for a certain activity: a dancing fool; a fool for skiing.
5. A member of a royal or noble household who provided entertainment, as with jokes or antics; a jester.
6. One who subverts convention or orthodoxy or varies from social conformity in order to reveal spiritual or moral truth: a holy fool.
7. A dessert made of stewed or puréed fruit mixed with cream or custard and served cold.
8. Archaic A mentally deficient person; an idiot.
v. fooled, fool·ing, fools
v.tr.
1. To deceive or trick; dupe: "trying to learn how to fool a trout with a little bit of floating fur and feather" (Charles Kuralt).
2. To confound or prove wrong; surprise, especially pleasantly: We were sure they would fail, but they fooled us.
v.intr.
1. Informal
a. To speak or act facetiously or in jest; joke: I was just fooling when I said I had to leave.
b. To behave comically; clown.
c. To feign; pretend: He said he had a toothache but he was only fooling.
2. To engage in idle or frivolous activity.
3. To toy, tinker, or mess: shouldn't fool with matches.
adj. Informal
Foolish; stupid: off on some fool errand or other.
Phrasal Verbs:
fool around Informal
1. To engage in idle or casual activity; putter: was fooling around with the old car in hopes of fixing it.
2. To engage in frivolous activity; make fun.
3. To engage in casual sexual activity.
4.
a. To have a sexual affair with someone who is not one's spouse or partner.
b. To have many sexual affairs.
fool away
To waste (time or money) foolishly; squander: fooled away the week's pay on Friday night.
Idiom:
play/act the fool
1. To act in an irresponsible or foolish manner.
2. To behave in a playful or comical manner.

[Middle English fol, from Old French, from Late Latin follis, windbag, fool, from Latin follis, bellows; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fooling - characterized by a feeling of irresponsibility; "a broken back is nothing to be casual about; it is no fooling matter"
light - psychologically light; especially free from sadness or troubles; "a light heart"
References in classic literature ?
If you are to become a writer you'll have to stop fooling with words," she explained.
This account cleared up the otherwise unaccountable mystery, and showed that the landlord, after all, had had no idea of fooling me --but at the same time what could I think of a harpooneer who stayed out a Saturday night clean into the holy Sabbath, engaged in such a cannibal business as selling the heads of dead idolators?
I would have given a good deal for that ulster, but it was too late now to be fooling around.