pedicel

(redirected from foot process)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to foot process: Filtration slits

ped·i·cel

 (pĕd′ĭ-səl, -sĕl′)
n.
1. Botany
a. A small stalk or stalklike part bearing a single flower in an inflorescence.
b. A support for a fern sporangium or moss capsule.
2. See pedicle.

[New Latin pedicellus, diminutive of Latin pediculus, diminutive of pēs, ped-, foot; see ped- in Indo-European roots.]

ped′i·cel′lar (-sĕl′ər) adj.

pedicel

(ˈpɛdɪˌsɛl)
n
1. (Botany) the stalk bearing a single flower of an inflorescence
2. (Biology) biology Also called: peduncle any short stalk bearing an organ or organism
3. (Zoology) the second segment of an insect's antenna
[C17: from New Latin pedicellus, from Latin pedīculus, from pēs foot]
pedicellate adj

ped•i•cel

(ˈpɛd ə səl, -ˌsɛl)

n.
1. the stalk of a single flower in a branched inflorescence.
[1670–80; < New Latin pedicellus, diminutive of Latin pediculus a little foot. See pedicle]

ped·i·cel

(pĕd′ĭ-səl)
A small stalk supporting a single flower in a plant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pedicel - a small stalk bearing a single flower of an inflorescencepedicel - a small stalk bearing a single flower of an inflorescence; an ultimate division of a common peduncle
ray - a branch of an umbel or an umbelliform inflorescence
peduncle - stalk bearing an inflorescence or solitary flower
Translations
szypułka

pedicel

[ˈpɛdɪˌsɛl] npedicello
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the fusion of podocytes' foot process was rare and the damage of GBM was modified in the Islets group (Figure-1.
3] integrin promoting cell motility and activation of small GTPases, such as Cdc42 and Rac1, which can lead to podocyte contraction, shifting from a stationary to motile phenotype and leading to foot process effacement and proteinuria (Figure 1) [45].
Electron microscopy showed extensive diffuse foot process effacement, and subepithelial electron dense deposits (Fig.
In addition the renal ultrastructural changes were in the form of blebbing of visceral epithelial cells and foot process disorganization.
The facility will utilize zero emission, wide-span electric cranes for all lift operations, which will operate over four, 3000 foot process tracks, providing 12,000 feet of working length.
In response to these stimuli and according to the developmental state at the time of the injury, podocytes may react in different ways: (1) they can modify their phenotype and undergo foot process effacement, a phenomenon that is not associated with alteration of the number of podocytes per glomerulus; (2) they can undergo apoptosis, an event that may occur as result of intrinsic or extrinsic damage; (3) under certain circumstances, podocytes may undergo developmental arrest and resemble immature precursors, a phenomenon generally accompanied by mild proliferative activity; and (4) adult podocytes can dedifferentiate and reenter the cell cycle to actively proliferate and, under specific circumstances, express a dysregulated phenotype.
Although minimal or no alterations are evident by light microscopy, electron microscopy reveals diffuse epithelial foot process effacement within the glomerulus of patients with minimal change disease (Brady et al.