foot-candle


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foot-can·dle

(fo͝ot′kăn′dl)
n. Abbr. fc or ft-c
A unit of measure of the intensity of light falling on a surface, equal to one lumen per square foot and originally defined with reference to a standardized candle burning at one foot from a given surface.

foot-candle

n
(Units) a former unit of illumination, equal to one lumen per square foot or 10.764 lux

foot′-can`dle



n.
a unit equivalent to the illumination produced by a source of one candle at a distance of one foot and equal to one lumen incident per square foot.
[1905–10]
References in periodicals archive ?
Contractor shall provide photometric design that meets the minimum horizontal and vertical foot-candle requirement for outdoor basketball court.
The supplier went above and beyond to provide lighting schematics, foot-candle specifications and a knowledgeable contractor to make the transition simple and easier to manage.
Control logic governs shade operation and artificial lighting levels, maintaining a uniform level of 20 foot-candle ambient light for occupied laboratory spaces regardless of the time of day.
Ample use of color also played a leading role in giving each department its own unique ambiance, as did the selection of the light fixtures, the foot-candle contrast in each department, and the sleek use of graduated ceiling planes in several of the departments.
Measurements were made in foot-candles, to a 10th of a foot-candle.
The measurement they used in their research was the foot-candle, or the amount of light put out by one candle, one foot away.
We recently conducted a research project in which the dining room provided only five foot-candles of light at the table, which is well below the 50 foot-candle recommendation.
At the meeting George Brainard (Thomas Jefferson University) demonstrated how our body stops producing melatonin --an important hormone that affects sleep, aging, and reproduction--when exposed to even a tenth of a foot-candle of certain wavelengths of light.
The article "Relighting a Hangar"--one of the aeronautic theme stories in this issue--described how the Minnesota Air National Guard's maintenance hangar transitioned from a 5-10 foot-candle mercury and incandescent system to a 1,000-W high-pressure sodium layout offering 100-plus fc using the same grid spacing.
1 foot-candle --roughly 10 times that from the full Moon.
People also had trouble with colors viewed under light from high-pressure sodium lamps at light levels below one foot-candle.