football


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foot·ball

 (fo͝ot′bôl′)
n.
1. Sports
a. A game played by two teams of 11 players each on a rectangular, 100-yard-long field with goal lines and goalposts at either end, the object being to gain possession of a ball and advance it in running or passing plays across the opponent's goal line or kick it through the air between the opponent's goalposts.
b. The inflated oval ball used in this game.
2. Chiefly British
a. Rugby.
b. Soccer.
c. The ball used in Rugby or soccer.
3. Informal A problem or issue that is discussed among groups or persons without being settled: The issue of tax reform became a political football.

football

(ˈfʊtˌbɔːl)
n
1. (Team Sports, other than specified)
a. any of various games played with a round or oval ball and usually based on two teams competing to kick, head, carry, or otherwise propel the ball into each other's goal, territory, etc. See association football, rugby, Australian Rules, American football, Gaelic football
b. (as modifier): a football ground; a football supporter.
2. (Team Sports, other than specified) the ball used in any of these games or their variants
3. a problem, issue, etc, that is continually passed from one group or person to another and treated as a pretext for argument instead of being resolved: he accused the government of using the strike as a political football.
ˈfootˌballer n

foot•ball

(ˈfʊtˌbɔl)

n.
1. an American game in which two opposing teams of 11 players each defend goals at opposite ends of a field, with points being scored chiefly by carrying the ball across the opponent's goal line or by place-kicking or drop-kicking the ball over the crossbar between the opponent's goal posts.
2. Canadian football.
3. the ball used in either of these games, an inflated oval with a bladder contained in a casing usu. made of leather.
4. Chiefly Brit. Rugby (def. 2).
5. Chiefly Brit. soccer.
6. a problem over which various parties debate continually.
7. (cap.) Slang. a briefcase containing the codes and options the president of the U.S. would use to launch a nuclear attack.
[1350–1400]
foot′ball`er, n.

Football

 

See Also: SPORTS

  1. The ball just skittered around in the backfield like a puck on ice —Jonathan Valin
  2. The ball peeled his head like an onion —Ken Stabler and Barry Stainback
  3. Both players bounce up like toys —Richard Ford
  4. My teammates were cringing in the huddle, like those scurvy hounds who live off garbage at county landfill projects —Pat Conroy
  5. Passes faltered and tumbled like wounded ducks —James Crumley
  6. Passes swerved like a diving duck —Y. A. Tittle, New York Giants quarterback, New York Times, January 12, 1987

    Tittle’s simile dates back to 1962 when his team won the playoff game for the National Football League championship.

  7. Pro football is like nuclear warfare. There are no winners, only survivors —Frank Gifford, Sports Illustrated, June 4, 1960
  8. [Gary Anderson of the Miami Dolphins] runs like a locomotive —Craig James, Anderson’s teammate, New York Times/Sports of the Times, September 10, 1986
  9. Some of them [professional players] always look like brooding Pillsbury Doughboys and some of them look wizened from the start, middle-aged and beaten down, as if they’d never known what it was like to be young —Jonathan Valin
  10. To me football is like a day off. I grew up picking cotton on my daddy’s farm and nobody asked for your autograph or put your name in the paper for that —Lee Roy Jordan
  11. Treated his players as if he had bought them at auction with a ring in their noses and was trying not to notice they smelled bad —Jim Murray, about football coach Paul Brown, Los Angeles Herald, 1986
  12. [Football] uniforms … heavy as mattresses —Lael Tucker Wertenbaker

    See Also: CLOTHING

  13. When you hit that line, it gave like a sponge, and when you tackled that big long Swede, he went down like he’d been hit by lightning —Sinclair Lewis
  14. Without a network outlet, football will disappear like cigar smoke in the wind —Harvey Meyerson, summation at NFL-USFL trial, 1986

football

1. 'football'

In Britain, football is a game played between two teams who kick a round ball around a field in an attempt to score goals. In America, this game is called soccer.

We met a group of Italian football fans.
There was a lot of pressure on the US soccer team.
2. 'American football'

In North America, football is a game played between two teams who throw or run with an oval ball in an attempt to score points. In Britain, this game is called American football.

This year's national college football championship was won by Princeton.
He was an American football star.
3. 'match'

In Britain, two teams play a football match. In America, they play a football game.

We watched the match between Arsenal and Manchester United.
Are you going to watch the football game Monday night?
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.football - any of various games played with a ball (round or oval) in which two teams try to kick or carry or propel the ball into each other's goalfootball - any of various games played with a ball (round or oval) in which two teams try to kick or carry or propel the ball into each other's goal
punting, punt - (football) a kick in which the football is dropped from the hands and kicked before it touches the ground; "the punt traveled 50 yards"; "punting is an important part of the game"
place kick, place-kicking - (sports) a kick in which the ball is placed on the ground before kicking
dropkick - (football) kicking (as for a field goal) in which the football is dropped and kicked as it touches the ground
juke, fake - (football) a deceptive move made by a football player
football score - the score in a football game
kickoff - (football) a kick from the center of the field to start a football game or to resume it after a score
contact sport - a sport that necessarily involves body contact between opposing players
field game - an outdoor game played on a field of specified dimensions
American football, American football game - a game played by two teams of 11 players on a rectangular field 100 yards long; teams try to get possession of the ball and advance it across the opponents goal line in a series of (running or passing) plays
professional football - football played for pay
rugby, rugby football, rugger - a form of football played with an oval ball
association football, soccer - a football game in which two teams of 11 players try to kick or head a ball into the opponents' goal
yard marker - (football) a marker indicating the yard line
midfield - (sports) the middle part of a playing field (as in football or lacrosse)
back - (football) a person who plays in the backfield
ball carrier, runner - (football) the player who is carrying (and trying to advance) the ball on an offensive play
snapper, center - (football) the person who plays center on the line of scrimmage and snaps the ball to the quarterback; "the center fumbled the handoff"
end - (football) the person who plays at one end of the line of scrimmage; "the end managed to hold onto the pass"
fullback - (football) the running back who plays the fullback position on the offensive team
halfback - (football) the running back who plays the offensive halfback position
forward passer, passer - (football) a ball carrier who tries to gain ground by throwing a forward pass
placekicker, place-kicker - (football) a kicker who makes a place kick for a goal
punter - (football) a person who kicks the football by dropping it from the hands and contacting it with the foot before it hits the ground
field general, quarterback, signal caller - (football) the person who plays quarterback
running back - (football) a back on the offensive team (a fullback or halfback) who tries to advance the ball by carrying it on plays from the line of scrimmage
rusher - (football) a ball carrier who tries to gain ground by running with the ball
split end - (football) an offensive end who lines up at a distance from the other linemen
tailback - (American football) the person who plays tailback
tight end - (football) an offensive end who lines up close to the tackle
wingback - (football) the person who plays wingback
winger - (sports) player in wing position
half - one of two divisions into which some games or performances are divided: the two divisions are separated by an interval
quarter - (football, professional basketball) one of four divisions into which some games are divided; "both teams scored in the first quarter"
line up - take one's position before a kick-off
fullback - play the fullback
quarterback - play the quarterback
place-kick - score (a goal) by making a place kick
kick - make a goal; "He kicked the extra point after touchdown"
complete, nail - complete a pass
tackle - seize and throw down an opponent player, who usually carries the ball
dropkick, drop-kick - drop and kick (a ball) as it touches the ground, as for a field goal
dropkick, drop-kick - make the point after a touchdown with a dropkick
ground - throw to the ground in order to stop play and avoid being tackled behind the line of scrimmage
return - make a return; "return a kickback"
running - of advancing the ball by running; "the team's running plays worked better than its pass plays"
pass, passing - of advancing the ball by throwing it; "a team with a good passing attack"; "a pass play"
2.football - the inflated oblong ball used in playing American football
ball - round object that is hit or thrown or kicked in games; "the ball travelled 90 mph on his serve"; "the mayor threw out the first ball"; "the ball rolled into the corner pocket"
bladder - a bag that fills with air

football

noun soccer, footy (informal), the beautiful game a game of football

Football

Terms used in (Association) Football  aggregate (score), back, ballplayer, ballwinner, booking or caution, breakaway, cap, catenaccio, centre circle, centre forward, centre half, clearance, cross, crossbar or bar, corner (kick), cut out, defender, derby, direct free kick, dribble, dummy, extra time, FA, FIFA, finishing, forward, foul, free kick, fullback, full time, goal, goal area or six-yard box, goalkeeper or goalie, goal kick or bye kick, goal net or net, goalpost or post, half, halfback, half time, half way line, handball, indirect free kick, inside left, inside right, inswinger, international, kick off, lay off, left back, linesman, long ball, mark, midfield, midfielder, nil, non-league, nutmeg, offside, offside trap, onside, one-two, outside left, outside right, own goal, pass, pass-back, penalty (kick) or spot kick, penalty area or penalty box, penalty shoot-out, penalty spot, playoff, professional foul, promotion, red card, referee, relegation, reserves, right back, Route One, save, score draw, sending-off or ordering-off, SFA, shot, six-yard line, sliding tackle, stoppage time or injury time, striker, square, substitute, sweeper, tackle, target man, throw in, total football, touchline, transfer, trap, UEFA, wall, wall pass, wing, winger, yellow card
Terms used in Australian Rules Football  Australian Football League or AFL, back pocket, behind or point, behind line, behind post, boundary, eighteen, the, field umpire, flank, footy, Aussie Rules, or (jocular) aerial ping-pong, follower, forward pocket, free kick, goal, goal umpire, guernsey, half-back, half-forward, handball, interchange, mark, nineteenth man, quarter, rove, rover, rub out, ruck, ruckrover, scrimmage, shepherd, shirt front, stab kick, stanza, throw in, twentieth man
Terms used in American football  backfield, blitz, block, center, complete, cornerback, defense, defensive back, defensive end, down, end zone, field goal, football or pigskin, fullback, gridiron, guard, halfback, incomplete, interception, kicker, line or line of scrimmage, line backer, lineman, offense, overtime, pass, play, point after, punt, punter, quarterback, run or rush, running back, sack, safety, scrimmage, secondary, shotgun, snap, special team, Super Bowl, tackle, tight end, touchback, touchdown, turnover, wide receiver
Translations
كُرَةُ القَدَمكُرَة القَدَمكُرَةُ القَدَم الأمريكيّةلُعْبَة كُرة القَدَم
americký fotbalfotbalfotbalovýfotbalový míčmíč na kopanou
fodboldfodbold-rugbyamerikansk fodbold
futbalo
ameerika jalgpalljalgpall
فوتبال
amerikkalainen jalkapallojalkapallojenkkifutis
nogometamerički nogomet
labdarúgásfocifocilabdafutball-labda
sepak bola
fótbolti
アメリカンフットボールサッカーサッカーボールフットボール
미식 축구축구축구공
futbalová loptafutbalový
nogometnogometna žogaameriški nogomet
fotbollamerikansk fotboll
ฟุตบอลฟุตบอลอเมริกันลูกฟุตบอล
американський футболканадійський футболканадський футболкопаний м’ячсокер
bóng bầu dục kiểu Mỹbóng đá

football

[ˈfʊtbɔːl]
A. N (Sport) → fútbol m; (= ball) → balón m de fútbol
to play footballjugar al fútbol
B. CPD football coupon N (Brit) → boleto m de quinielas
football ground Ncampo m or (LAm) cancha f de fútbol
football hooligan N (Brit) → hooligan mf
football hooliganism N (Brit) → hooliganismo m, violencia f en las gradas
football league Nliga f de fútbol
football match Npartido m de fútbol
football player Njugador(a) m/f de fútbol, futbolista mf
football pools NPLquinielas fpl
football season Ntemporada f de fútbol
football supporter Nhincha mf
football team Nequipo m de fútbol

football

[ˈfʊtbɔːl]
n
(= ball) → ballon m (de football)
Paul threw the football over the fence → Paul a envoyé le ballon par dessus la clôture.
(= sport) (British)football m
I like playing football → J'aime jouer au football.
(= American football) (US)football m américain
modif
(British) [championship, club, team, stadium] → de football
(US) [game] → de football américain

football

n
Fußball m; (= American football)(American) Football m
(= ball)Fußball m, → Leder nt (inf)

football

:
football boot
nFußballschuh m, → Fußballstiefel m
football casual
nFußballprolo m (inf)
football coupon
n (Brit) → Tippzettel m, → Totoschein m

football

:
football fan
nFußballfan m
football hooligan
nFußballrowdy or -hooligan m
football hooliganism
nFußballkrawalle pl

football

[ˈfʊtˌbɔːl]
1. n (ball) → pallone m (Sport) (Brit) → calcio (000) (Am) → football m americano
2. adj (team, supporters) → di calcio

foot

(fut) plural feet (fiːt) noun
1. the part of the leg on which a person or animal stands or walks. My feet are very sore from walking so far.
2. the lower part of anything. at the foot of the hill.
3. (plural often foot ; often abbreviated to ft when written) a measure of length equal to twelve inches (30.48 cm). He is five feet/foot six inches tall; a four-foot wall.
ˈfooting noun
1. balance. It was difficult to keep his footing on the narrow path.
2. foundation. The business is now on a firm footing.
ˈfootball noun
1. a game played by kicking a large ball. The children played football; (also adjective) a football fan.
2. the ball used in this game.
ˈfoothill noun
a small hill at the foot of a mountain. the foothills of the Alps.
ˈfoothold noun
a place to put one's feet when climbing. to find footholds on the slippery rock.
ˈfootlight noun
(in a theatre) a light which shines on the actors etc from the front of the stage.
ˈfootmanplural ˈfootmen noun
a male servant wearing a uniform. The footman opened the door.
ˈfootmark noun
a footprint. He left dirty footmarks.
ˈfootnote noun
a note at the bottom of a page. The footnotes referred to other chapters of the book.
ˈfootpath noun
a path or way for walking, not for cars, bicycles etc. You can go by the footpath.
ˈfootprint noun
the mark or impression of a foot. She followed his footprints through the snow.
ˈfootsore adjective
with painful feet from too much walking. He arrived, tired and footsore.
ˈfootstep noun
the sound of a foot. She heard his footsteps on the stairs.
ˈfootwear noun
boots, shoes, slippers etc. He always buys expensive footwear.
follow in someone's footsteps
to do the same as someone has done before one. When he joined the police force he was following in his father's footsteps.
foot the bill
to be the person who pays the bill.
on foot
walking. She arrived at the house on foot.
put one's foot down
to be firm about something. I put my foot down and refused.
put one's foot in it
to say or do something stupid. I really put my foot in it when I asked about his wife – she had just run away with his friend!

football

كُرَةُ القَدَم, كُرَةُ القَدَم الأمريكيّة americký fotbal, fotbal, míč na kopanou amerikansk fodbold, fodbold Amerikanischer Fußball, Fußball Αμερικανικό ποδόσφαιρο, ποδόσφαιρο balón, balón de fútbol, fútbol, fútbol americano amerikkalainen jalkapallo, jalkapallo ballon de foot, football, football américain američki nogomet, nogomet calcio, football americano, pallone da calcio アメリカンフットボール, サッカーボール, フットボール 미식 축구, 축구, 축구공 American football, voetbal amerikansk fotball, fotball futbol amerykański, piłka, piłka nożna bola de futebol, futebol, futebol americano американский футбол, футбол, футбольный мяч amerikansk fotboll, fotboll ฟุตบอล, ฟุตบอลอเมริกัน, ลูกฟุตบอล Amerikan futbolu, futbol, futbol topu bóng bầu dục kiểu Mỹ, bóng đá 美式橄榄球, 足球

football

n fútbol or futbol americano
References in classic literature ?
He sat down at the old piano and played as he had never played; and if there are those who think he had better have been kicking a football I can only say that I wholly agree with them.
They worked with furious intensity, literally upon the run-- at a pace with which there is nothing to be compared except a football game.
I've talked about theatres and music-halls, of events of the day, I've even--Heaven help me--talked of racing and football, but I might as well have talked of Herbert Spencer.
At the last Yale-Harvard football game, it conveyed almost instantaneous news to fifty thousand people in various parts of New England.
It was a round thing, the size of a football perhaps, or, it may be, bigger, and tentacles trailed down from it; it seemed black against the weltering blood-red water, and it was hopping fitfully about.
Chain mail, or an American football suit--that's what you'll want.
Skimpole, who was standing before the fire telling Richard how fond he used to be, in his school-time, of football.
In the afternoon they went up to play football, but Mr.
The football match does not come within my horizon at all.
The Vaterland bounded like a football some one has kicked and when they looked out again, Union Square was small and remote and shattered, as though some cosmically vast giant had rolled over it.
At twelve or thereabout I put the literary calling to bed for a time, having gone to a school where cricket and football were more esteemed, but during the year before I went to the university, it woke up and I wrote great part of a three-volume novel.
On John's footer [in England soccer was called football, "footer for short] days she never once forgot his sweater, and she usually carried an umbrella in her mouth in case of rain.